Nepal : China cuts down India's Influence

Discussion in 'Subcontinent & Central Asia' started by Singh, Apr 23, 2009.

  1. White Clouds

    White Clouds Regular Member

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    Hi! Please don't mind that persons remark. I believe he is either a troll or a disinfo poster posing as Indian. I am an Indian and I do not share his views. Whilst I do not support the Maoist in Kathmandu but I do support democracy for Nepal. I have been visiting Kathmandu from more than 18 years. During the rule of old King Birendra Kathmandu was a improving nation with close and good ties to India. Ever since Maoist has taken over Nepal it has gone from good to bad to worse in terms of economically and progress. Indians and Nepal have always had close ties due to our close proximity and Nepal being a Hindu country but since Maoist have taken over it is in constant state of deterioration and the relation with India has also soured which is I guess what Pakistan and China want.

    India has always and will always in future welcome Nepal with open arms as brothers. No amount of foreign hand in trying to sour our relation will succeed.
     
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  2. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Did Prachanda send SOS to Sonia?


    KATHMANDU: Hopelessly caught in the quicksand of Nepal’s politics and with little chance of receiving a helping hand from the other political parties, did Maoist chief and former prime minister Pushpa Kamal Dahal Prachanda send an SOS to his bête noir India, yet again? That’s the claim made by a Nepali weekly known for its relentless ferreting out of skeletons in politicians’ and aristocrats’ cupboards.

    The Jana Aastha daily reported on Wednesday that the Maoist leader had contacted Ahmed Patel, the political advisor of Congress president Sonia Gandhi, seeking access to her. However, there had been no positive response so far, it added.

    In 2009, when the Prachanda government was on the brink of collapse, it had then sent an urgent request to Prime Minister Manmohan Singh to send an envoy to sort out the mess. However, New Delhi, weary of the strident anti-India bashing by the Maoists, declined, calling it an internal matter of Nepal, and the first Maoist government of Nepal fell.

    While the Maoists rejected the tabloid report, it is growingly obvious that the former guerrillas, who fought a 10-year war successfully, are badly floundering in their new political battle and will not be able to win unless there is a miracle. A week after Nepal’s Prime Minister Madhav Kumar Nepal resigned, the largest party in parliament has still not been able to garner sufficient support from the 24 other parties in the house to stake claim to a new government, though it had been seeking to topple Nepal for 13 fruitless months.

    On Wednesday, as the deadline given by President Ram Baran Yadav to form a new government supported by all the parties ended without any result, the squabbling leaders had to agree to ask Yadav to extend the period by five days. In the past, the same parties had failed to hold elections in time and draft a new constitution in time.

    Now there are serious doubts whether a new government would be formed even if the president grants an extension. Even if a new government is formed, it is debatable whether it would be able to unveil a new constitution by next year. Already nearly six weeks have gone by and the parties have yet not resumed writing the new constitution.

    The continued failure of the parties to get their act together must come as balm for deposed king Gyanendra Bir Bikram Shah, who celebrates his 63rd birthday on Wednesday. The more the parties fail the more ardent grows the support for the crown with royalists campaigning for the restoration of monarchy. The last king of Nepal, who has begun a "religious diplomacy", visiting Hindu temples, has begun to break his stony silence since he lost his throne in 2008, saying monarchy could make a comeback if the people of Nepal so desired.
     
  3. Tshering22

    Tshering22 Sikkimese Saber Senior Member

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    I think we need to get to understand the public sentiments of Nepalese people first. They are deeply religious community and are happy with their cultural and religious status of their country--something common in entire east. Our government messed up big time when it introduced state Secularism through government machinery which Nepali people don't like. This was interfering in the personal lives of Nepali people.

    Now comes the political part. Rather than trying to appease the US by playing its puppy Democracy boy, India should have observed carefully keeping a neutral approach to King Gyanendra's rule and rather considered propping the more patriotic and people-friendly parties like Rashtriya Prajatantra Party and other such associated political organizations that actually understand Nepalese better than a bunch of Red-clad trigger-happy psychos propped up by Beijing.

    To make the matters worse, instead of helping Nepali Army gain more public support by openly claiming General Chhatraman Singh Gurung as a strong pro-Nepali person, we ruined the show by trying to hide in the last minute and Maoists earning the ticket that India was going to bring army rule in Nepal sometime back. Another factor that weakens Nepal relations with us is our own Maoists.

    Until we shut our eyes like day-dreamers and call it a LAW AND ORDER problem only, this will get worse. Maoists form common ring across the border and it is common factor. To appease Left, the government does nothing to the Maoists and refuses to press the military into attack. EVERY war has collateral damage and for victory we must be prepared for a few injuries as well. The well connected network of Maoists on both sides is what makes it worse for Nepal. Being a weak economy, they are affected a 1000 times more than we are and therefore there is public ire in the eyes of Nepali people against Indian government.

    I have spoken to numerous Nepalis and actually they are very warm towards Indian people due to common culture and faith, but it is the government policies and the indecisive attitude of GOI that they despise that is causing foreign powers to play games in their country.
     
  4. ejazr

    ejazr Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    China cuts down India's influence in Nepal

    www.outlookindia.com | Chopped Sticks
    China ups the ante, looks to cut India’s influence in the Himalayan state
    Manoj Dahal
    When former Indian president A.P.J. Abdul Kalam visited Nepal in November ’08, he drove straight from the airport to the Ka-Nying Shedrub Ling monastery, popularly known as Seto Gumba, throwing into a tizzy his security personnel who were blissfully unaware of his sudden whimsy. Kalam wanted to discuss with the abbot, Chokyi Nyima Rimpoche, the role Buddhism could play in mitigating hunger and hatred, the two causes of past and future conflicts. Kalam subsequently emerged from the discussion to declare that the abbot’s wisdom and vision had impressed him immensely.

    It’s this wisdom that have won the Rimpoche and other Tibetan monks a huge following in Kathmandu, which boasts in and around the city at least 50 monasteries. For China, though, their wisdom is diabolic, harnessed as it is to their dream of fomenting unrest in China and winning freedom for Tibet. To them, the monasteries are a “cockpit of conspiracies”, arrayed against China. Their belief matches in nature and fervour India’s suspicion about the mushrooming of madrassas along the open Indo-Nepal border, often viewed in New Delhi as inimical to its security interests.

    Last December, the ‘cockpit of conspiracies’, claimed a prominent media house here quoting intelligence sources, had become a storehouse of arms for Free Tibet activisits. The raging controversy even forced the intelligence department to come out and deny the report. But China wasn’t convinced, refusing to believe what is now the customary response of the Nepali government to such charges: “We will not allow our territory to be used against China.”

    China’s disquiet at such reports was articulated during last week’s visit of He Yong, vice-premier and central secretariat member of the Communist Party of China (CPC), who was leading a 21-member delegation here. He told Prime Minister Madhav Nepal bluntly, “We want this assurance matched by action.” Linking the supposedly growing anti-China activities to the increasing influence of the EU and India, he spoke these words, “China will take any interference in Nepal’s internal affairs very seriously.” The Chinese delegation subsequently furnished a list of instances detailing the massive scale on which Free Tibet activists were conducting their campaign.

    You don’t have to be a diplomat to comprehend the true import of He Yong’s statements—that China no longer views Nepal as India’s sphere of influence; it fears India and other powers could exploit the Tibet issue to destabilise China; and Nepal is on its way to becoming a theatre of the shadow boxing between its giant northern and southern neighbours. China’s rising interest in Nepal can be deduced from this simple fact—He Yong’s visit is the 21st by China’s commissars in less than three years.

    China reversed its perceived policy of indifference to Nepal following the abolition of monarchy. All the kings, including Gyanendra, had nurtured a relationship of trust with the Chinese leaders, addressing their paranoid concerns about Tibetan activists whose activities were stringently curbed. This had often prompted New Delhi to accuse the monarchy of playing the China card against India. With the monarchy summarily voted out, experts say China wants to legitimise its interests in Nepal and isn’t willing to subscribe to the traditional view that India enjoys a primacy of interest in Kathmandu.

    And they haven’t been idle. Already there’s around 75 Nepali-Chinese joint ventures in the hospitality sector happening. As for the massage parlours in Kathmandu’s touristy area, Thamel, the Chinese have taken it over. Beijing has bagged the Upper Trishuli hydro project and is close to clinching the Rahughat hydro project in which it will have an 80 per cent stake. (Till now, India always sought preferential rights in this sector over other foreign companies.) In addition, there has been a flurry of media and academic exchanges between Nepal and China, which is providing scholarships to Nepali students in large numbers.

    Beijing is also fishing in the veritable political swamp of Nepal. When India allegedly helped form the Terai Madhes Loktantrik Party (TMLP) in ’07, Beijing viewed this as New Delhi’s attempt to create a “buffer within a buffer” (Nepal is popularly seen as a buffer between China and India), detrimental to China’s interests. In response, China forged close links with the Madheshi Jana Adhikar Forum (MJF)—its annual conference last year even had a delegation of the Communist Party of China participating. The MJF is also said to have received financial support from China.

    Beijing’s desire to play a political role in Nepal was best illustrated through the controversial taped conversation between an unidentified Chinese official and K.B. Mahara, head of the foreign affairs cell of the Unified Communist Party of Nepal-Maoists (UCPN-M). Mahara allegedly demanded from the Chinese official Rs 500 million to bribe parliamentarians into voting for a Maoist PM. The Maoists are yet to deny the conversation.

    No wonder Sinologists believe China-India issues will dominate Nepal in the coming years. They say Beijing’s approach to India in Nepal can be best summed as a policy of cooperation, competition, and if the situation demands, confrontation. This take may not be too far-fetched as China has linked the mainland to Tibet by the railroad, which is expected to be further extended to Nepal. An ‘India-locked Nepal’, a phrase popular among many analysts here, may find a new opening through the north. But Bhekh Bahadur Thapa, Nepal’s most respected diplomat, told Outlook, “We should get benefits from the world’s two largest and emerging economies; promoting clashes between the two countries is premature and will be unwise. We should also not ignore the fact that one (China) has the Himalayan corridor, and the other (India) has an open border.”

    All said, India still remains sanguine about its prospects in Nepal. As Indian embassy spokesperson Apoorva Srivastav puts it, “It will be an injustice to see Nepal-India relations through the prism of a third country. Our relationship is multi-faceted, government to government, business to business and people to people.” In other words, she seems to suggest that China’s relations with Nepal can never match Nepal’s multidimensional relations with India.

    Perhaps not yet. But there’s no denying that China has stepped on the pedal, nurturing its own interests, no doubt, but in the process also subtly challenging India’s primacy here. As for Tibetans in Nepal, China’s growing clout could mean living constantly in the fear of incarceration and persecution.
     
  5. lcatejas

    lcatejas Regular Member

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    It happen's when the power comes in the hand of Stupid Maoist joker's and Chinese puppet ....:frusty:
     
  6. amitkriit

    amitkriit Senior Member Senior Member

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    India has managed to salvage the situation in Nepal. What has rattled China the most is support for Tibetan cause from within the Maoist camp. India might be slow, but our policy-makers aren't totally dumb.

    China has got a habit of going too fast too early, but in the long run we will be able to counter them. India and Nepal relations are different from typical international relations.
     
  7. amitkriit

    amitkriit Senior Member Senior Member

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    Free Tibet activities from Nepal Soil, Maoists leader’s support noticed

    Here is spine chilling news, though a delayed one, for China and its local followers.

    Latest media report claims that Free Tibetan activists are vigorously campaigning against China in a broad day light from Solukhumbu district of Nepal which adjoins the border with China’s Tibetan Autonomous region.

    The report published in Sourya vernacular daily, April 8, 2012, claims that the supporters of The Dalai Lama roam around the Lukla-Namche region of Solukhumbu wearing 'Free Tibet' imprinted T-shirts.

    Two weeks ago, cadres of Unified Maoist associated with the Young Communist League (YCL) had detained five Free Tibetan activists and had forwarded them to the local police, it has been learnt.

    "The Police at first refused to arrest Free Tibetan activists saying that they enjoy support of local people. But we insisted and police later reluctantly put them in custody", says Rajendra Basnet, a former in charge of Unified Maoist of Solukhumbu district.

    After two days, the police released those Free Tibetan activists, reveals the report.

    According to the local source, those released activists are now energetically campaigning against China from Lukla-Namche region of Solukhumbu district.

    Senior leader of Unified Maoist party Mr. Gopal Kirati, who is now serving as a Minister of Culture in the incumbent Bhattarai led government is openly supporting those Free Tibetan activists, confirm the report as published by the Sourya daily.

    It is widely talked that Gopal Kirati, who frequently appears in the programs organized by the local Christian missionaries, is excessively close to the Western countries.

    Who is not close to the West?

    Mr. Kirati represents the establishment faction inside Unified Maoist party led by Chairman Prachanda. This must have some meaning underneath.

    Prachanda is the best friend of China though.

    "Maoist lawmaker Aangdawa Sherpa, Maoist leader Ngimatendup Sherpa, district in charge of Unified Maoist Karyang Sherpa, District chief of CPN-UML Aangngima Lama were among those who are backstopping Free Tibetan activists from the Nepali soil of Solu district", claims the report as published by the Sourya daily.

    To recall, Mrs. Aangdawa Sherpa was elevated to the rank of a lawmaker due to the excessive pressure from Gopal Kirati of the Unified Maoists party. After the elevation of Mrs. Aangdawa to the rank of lawmaker, the local cadres and leaders of Maoists who had fought a decade long civil war were mercilessly sidelined inside the party, it is learnt.

    After the formation of the government under the premiership of Pushpa Kamal Dahal alias Prachanda', Mrs. Aangdawa Sherpa had published an article supporting Free Tibetan movement in the Sherpa language in the government owned daily Gorkhapatra.

    "Our party is playing double. Party headquarter says that the party will not tolerate any anti-Chinese activities inside the Nepali soil. But its own leaders are boosting the morale of Free Tibetan activists by supporting them in an open manner ", opine local Maoists leaders.

    So this is China’s “matured diplomacy” in Nepal.

    Sourya Daily thanks.

    ==============
    This is a propaganda site al-right, but there is no smoke without fire.
     
  8. anoop_mig25

    anoop_mig25 Senior Member Senior Member

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    is there any link ??

    mode delete my post it was mistake
     
  9. ejazr

    ejazr Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    That is old news.

    Nepal situation is much better now. The maoists have agreed to end their seperate "army" so basically the one state two armies concept is dead.

    All nepalese armed forces will be under a single command that gives India better leverage .
     
    sesha_maruthi27 likes this.
  10. sesha_maruthi27

    sesha_maruthi27 Senior Member Senior Member

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    Yesterday in the news paper I read this and it says the entire maoist army is going to be under the Nepalese Army............
     

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