Nepal : China cuts down India's Influence

Discussion in 'Subcontinent & Central Asia' started by Singh, Apr 23, 2009.

  1. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    Nepal Maoists set to disrupt parliament

    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/World/Nepal-Maoists-to-disrupt-parliament/articleshow/4486687.cms
     
  2. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    Inducting the Maoists into the army will be a security nightmare for both Nepal and India. Those guys will be try to turn the vulnerable soldiers of the NA into commies. That is not a good idea. Its like the PA openly inducting Taliban into the Army.
     
  3. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    Nepal president sets Saturday deadline to form new govt

    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/...deadline-for-new-govt/articleshow/4487062.cms
     
  4. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    Nepal must be ranked second after Italy for the number of elections they have.
    The current elections cost us 10,000 crores. Guys go and vote on the 7th if its in your area. We want a stable government. Cant keep shelling out 10,000 crores. We can buy Apaches instead for the same amount.
     
  5. Daredevil

    Daredevil On Vacation! Administrator

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    NEPAL: What Next?

    NEPAL: What Next?

    By B. Raman

    In a televised address to the nation on the afternoon of May 4, 2009, the Maoist Prime Minister of Nepal, Pushpa Kamal Dahal, popularly known as Prachanda, dramatically announced his resignation in the wake of opposition to his decision the previous day to sack the 61-year-old Army Chief Gen Rukmangad Katawal following the General’s opposition to the demand of Prachanda for the integration of the members of the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) raised by the Maoists during their days in the insurgency into the Army. Gen. Kul Bahadur Khadka, the No.2 in the Army, was asked by Prachanda to act as the Chief of the Army Staff (COAS) until further orders.

    2. Before announcing his decision, Prachanda met with Katawal and Khadka separately first, then jointly, before seeking the approval of the Cabinet for sacking the COAS. His decision was opposed by the Communist Party of Nepal (United Marxist-Leninist) with 108 members in the Constituent Assembly, which decided to quit the ruling coalition Government. “We decided to withdraw our support to protest the Prime Minister’s unilateral decision,” CPN-UML General Secretary Ishwar Pokhrel said.

    3. While the Nepali Congress and the Madhesi Peoples Party joined 17 other parties in opposing the sacking of the General, the Madhesi People’s Rights Forum (MPRF) with 51 members in the Assembly and some other smaller parties maintained an ambivalent attitude. The MPRF reportedly submitted a note of dissent disagreeing with Prachanda’s decision, but did not leave the coalition. The CPN-Maoist with 229 seats in the Constituent Assembly needed the crucial support from MPRF and other small parties to continue to enjoy a majority in the 601-member Assembly tasked to frame a new constitution for the country after it abolished its unpopular 240-year-old monarchy last year.

    4. Prachanda’s action in unilaterally sacking the Army Chief despite strong opposition in the coalition Cabinet was nullified by the President Ram Baran Yadav, who faxed a special instruction to the Chief of the Army Staff "asking him to continue in his office in the capacity of CoAS as per the Interim Constitution, 2007, and the existing law".

    5. The spokesman of the Maoists, Krishna Bahadur Mahara, who is the Minister for Information and Communication, told the media that the President’s order to the COAS to continue in office was tantamount to a "constitutional coup" and said that the Maoists would fight back with street protests. He said: "The President is... violating constitutional norms. The President's move has put the peace process in peril. Our party has taken the President's step as a constitutional coup and we will fight against it. The executive power to sack and appoint an acting army chief lies with the Government and not the President. We will stick to our decision. We don't have any plans to quit the Government."

    6. Prachanda called the Attorney General Raghav Lal Baidya and senior Cabinet colleagues early on May 4 to discuss the constitutionality and consequences of the President's intervention. There was speculation that the Maoists might move for the impeachment of the President. After finding that they would not have the required support for such a move in the Constituent Assembly, he decided to resign.

    7. It remains to be seen whether his resignation is a purely tactical move to confront the other members of the ruling coalition with the danger of serious political instability if they did not support his sacking of the Army chief or was forced by his realizing that there was no way he could have his way against the Army chief. Both the Army chief and Prajwal, the Commander of the seventh division of the PLA, were reported to have ordered the two forces under their respective command to remain in a state of alert to prevent any disturbance of law and order.

    8. The peace accord reached by the various political parties before last year’s election to the Constituent Assembly had provided for the rehabilitation and integration of the members of the PLA and other Maoist cadres, including members of the people’s courts set up by the Maoists during their days in the insurgency. After Prachanda assumed office in August last year as the Prime Minister, differences surfaced over the interpretation of this principle. The Maoists treated rehabilitation and integration as synonymous and insisted that the only of rehabilitating the 19,000 members of the PLA was by integrating them into the Army, barring those physically unfit or unwilling to serve in the Army.

    9. The Army and other political parties were strongly opposed to this. They held that rehabilitation and integration were two different processes. According to them, rehabilitation meant enabling the Maoist cadres to be gainfully employed, but not necessarily in the Army. While they were prepared to consider the integration of small numbers of the PLA into the Army if they were found to be professionally suitable, they were not prepared to agree to the wholesale merger of the PLA into the Army. Such an action would have resulted in about one-fourth of the Army consisting of indoctrinated Maoists, with their number steadily increasing with fresh recruitment.

    10. Prachanda also wanted that the Maoists, who held officer-equivalent ranks in the PLA, should be given appropriate ranks in the Army. Thus, he reportedly wanted PLA commander Nanda Kishor Pun “Pasang” to be made a Major General and many others to get the rank of Brigadiers. He also reportedly wanted that there should be no new recruitment to the Army for some years.

    11. Neil Horning, an American expert on the Maoist movement of Nepal, who is himself believed to be sympathetic to the Maoists, wrote as follows is his blogspot on the controversy between rehabilitation and integration: “The mainstream parties, as well as the elite in the army, view army integration in an apocalyptic light. While integrating the PLA into the NA was agreed upon time and again in the course of peace negotiations, the Non-Maoist parties made their agreements under the assumption that the Maoists could not possibly win electoral victory, and would not be in charge of implementing the integration. They counted on returning to the long standing Nepali political habit of agreeing to a demand in negotiation and then reneging on it later when the opponent is not in a position to make a challenge. They are trying to do the same now by continually insisting that Maoists combatants be “rehabilitated” rather than integrated, but it is they who have lost their bargaining position. Yet, why can’t they let it happen in the first place? The Maoists don’t have more than 20,000 troops to integrate into the more than 90,000 currently in the Army. This would hardly make the army into a force at the Maoists’ beck and call. It’s not that the army would become the private force of the Maoists, but that it would cease to be a check on them. With at least 25 per cent of troops and officers being former Maoist partisans, the possibility of a reactionary coup becomes impossible. The troops needed to suppress the public would simply turn their weapons on the command. Therefore, the army would cease to be a check and social change would continue unabated.”

    12. According to Kanak Mani Dixit, the Nepali political analyst, “at their large National Council conclave in the Kharipati outskirts of Kathmandu in late November 2008, the Maoists came to the conclusion that they were in government but did not control the state, for which the Nepal Army and the independent judiciary were found to be prime obstacles. It decided that the (Maoist) cantonments should not be disbanded until the new constitution is written.”

    13. When the Maoists found that whenever they had a dispute with the Army over issues such as the ban on new recruitment which was disregarded by the COAS the judiciary was taking up a position, which was unfavourable to the Maoists, they also started talking of integrating the members of the former Maoists’ people’s courts into the judiciary.

    14. The COAS went ahead with the new recruitment recruiting nearly 2800 persons to fill up existing vacancies in the Army and the PLA retaliated by making fresh recruitment to the PLA in violation of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement. Thus, Nepal under Prachanda as the Prime Minister saw the spectre of two parallel armies---- the state Army and the non-State PLA--- strengthening and preparing themselves for a future confrontation should the Maoists’ demand for total integration be turned down.

    15. While the Chinese closely monitored the situation by interacting intensely with various political formations, India and the US reportedly cautioned Prachanda against a confrontation on this issue. Prachanda increasingly became unresponsive to the advice for moderation from India and the US and insisted on having his way.

    16. It is not clear why Prachanda decided to force a confrontation with the COAS at this stage instead of waiting till September, when Gen. Katawal is due to superannuate. One possible reason for his hasty action is that Gen. Khadka, who is believed to be not opposed to the integration of the PLA into the Army, is due to superannuate in June. It is suspected that Prachanda wanted to make him the chief before his superannuation and give him a two-year tenure so that the integration of the PLA into the Army could be brought about without any further opposition from the Army. His plans were thwarted by the President.

    17. What could happen now? The following are the possible scenarios:

    SCENARIO 1: A serious political crisis with violent demonstrations by the Maoists which results in one more compromise. The Chinese will try their best to see that the Maoist-led Government, which has effectively put down Tibetan activity in Nepali territory, remains in power.
    SCENARIO 2: A violent confrontation between the PLA and the Army leading to an army coup.
    SCENARIO 3: A new coalition without the Maoists, which will be unstable.
    18. In my article dated April 28, 2008, titled “Prachanda: From A Radical Maoist to A Lovable Mascot” available at Prachanda: From A Radical Maoist to A Lovable Mascot

    I wrote as follows: “Taking advantage of the popular uprising of 2006 against the widely-detested King, the Maoists entered the coalition Government, which replaced a Government of royalist stooges, and started dictating terms as to how the integration should take place. They themselves became one of the policy-makers to decide on the process of integration. The integration is taking place not on the basis of negotiations between the Government and the insurgents, but in response to diktats issued from time to time by the Maoists in return for their continued participation in the Government. They are all the time giving out discreet threats that if their diktats are rejected, they might quit the Government and revert to insurgency. The holding of the elections to the Constituent Assembly before the ground rules for integration were agreed upon and the victory of the Maoists in the elections----significant, but not spectacular as projected by sections of the media--- have led to a situation where the Maoists will be at the head of a Government which will take crucial decisions on the post-facto legitimisation of the terrorist infrastructure raised by the Maoists and on the ground rules for the integration of their ideologically motivated and well-trained cadres. The moment the Maoists assume leadership in the seats of power and decision-making, will it be possible to resist their demands? If the integration of over 3000 ideologically indoctrinated cadres of the insurgent army into the Nepal Army comes about, we will have to the west of us an army ideologically motivated by jihadi doctrines and to the east of us an army ideologically motivated by Marxism, Leninism and Mao's Thoughts. There are two possible scenarios--- these fears turn out to be baseless and Prachanda turns out to be a genuine democrat and a genuine friend of India or Prachanda after the elections turns out to be different from Prachanda before the elections and takes Nepal on a road, which would be detrimental to our national interests. While hoping for the first scenario, we must be prepared for the second. “

    19. In a subsequent article dated August 9, 2008, titled “RISE OF MAOISTS IN NEPAL: IMPLICATIONS FOR INDIA” available at NEPAL:  Rise of Maoists- Implications for India I wrote as follows: “Addressing the Nepal Council of World Affairs at Kathmandu on August 5, 2008, the Chinese Ambassador to Nepal Zheng Xianglin said: "Nepal is situated in a favorable geographical position in South Asia, and is a passage linking China and South Asia." That is the reason for the Chinese interest in Nepal----as a passage to South Asia and as an instrument for strengthening the Chinese presence in South Asia. China has a Look South policy to counter our Look East policy. As we try to move Eastwards to cultivate the countries of South-East Asia, it is trying to move southwards to outflank us. China is not a South Asian power, but it already has a growing South Asian strategic presence----- in Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Bangladesh. It is hoping to acquire a similar presence in Nepal with the co-operation of a Maoist-dominated Government.”

    20. China would try its best to see that the Maoists stay in power. Their continuance in power in Kathmandu is important for stability in Tibet. In the past, we had supported the Maoists thinking that Prachanda would take a neutral line between India and China. These hopes are elusive. Should we facilitate the Chinese designs in Nepal by bringing about a political compromise which would enable the Maoists to continue in power or has the time come to work for a non-Maoist alternative? This requires serious examination in our policy-making circles.
     
  6. Pintu

    Pintu New Member

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    As asked by the Nepalese President to from a New Govt., it will remain to be seen that what is stored for the future of this Himalayan Country, as Maoists themselves threatened to interrupt Nepalese Parliament's proceedings until their demand met, this radicalisation of Nepali democratic Parliamentary politics from very first day of his birth, will endanger the democracy itself, and also the same matter the Nepalese Constitution is itself confusing as the constitution of Nepal is still uncertain, but what is truth as water that The Prime Minister can not solely take a decision by His/Her own, unless he/she has the backing and endorsement of the Council of Ministers and Coalition Partners, and if it is jurisdiction of The President of Nepal is to reject an order by the Prime Minister then he / she can do that, therefore the resignation by the Prime Minister is not only unexpected but also it cast Negative Impact of the democratisation of Nepal, to steer the country from his very first date with Parliamentary Democracy to Constitutional Crisis in its infant stage.

    Regards
     
  7. Pintu

    Pintu New Member

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    The Times of India reports that The Supreme Court of Nepal issues notice to Nepal President

    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/...-to-Presidents-office/articleshow/4487654.cms


    Army chief case: Nepal SC issues notice to President's office
    5 May 2009, 1947 hrs IST, PTI


    KATHMANDU: Nepal's Supreme Court on Tuesday issued a notice to the presidential secretariat, asking it to reply within 10 days why President Ram
    Baran Yadav reinstated the army chief after he was sacked by the Maoist government.

    The court was hearing a petition challenging Yadav's direction to Army Chief General Rukmangad Katawal to continue in his post. Nepal's first Maoist Prime Minister Prachanda resigned yesterday, accusing the President of taking an "unconstitutional and undemocratic decision".

    Prachanda sacked Katawal after a months-long bitter stand-off over the issue of former Maoist rebels' integration into the army and other issues. The Maoists say that by reinstating Katawal, Yadav has overstepped his powers.

    The apex court served a ten-day notice to the President's office to furnish a reply as to why Yadav issued an order to Katawal to stay in office despite the cabinet's decision to sack him. The petition was filed by Nepal-based International Institute for Human Rights, Environment and Development (INHURED), a non-governmental organisation.

    Sri Krishna Subedi, on behalf of INHURED International, questioned the legality of the President's order and pleaded for the intervention of the apex court in the matter.
     
  8. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    Nepal crisis deepens as Maoists clash with police

    KATHMANDU: Police clashed on Wednesday with protesting Maoists, who vowed to block a new government from forming unless the president supported the firing of the country's army chief - the key dispute that has thrown the Himalayan country into crisis.

    The clash came after the president on Sunday overruled an order from Prime Minister Pushpa Kamal Dahal to fire the country's military chief. Dahal, a former Maoist guerrilla leader who entered mainstream politics in 2006, accused the army's leader of refusing to bring former communist fighters into the military. Dahal resigned on Monday in protest.

    On Wednesday, police used tear gas and bamboo batons to break up a protest of about 500 supporters of Dahal's Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist) in the capital, Kathmandu. No one was seriously injured. Authorities have imposed ban on protests and rallies in key areas of Kathmandu this week.

    Maoists have been holding protests since Dahal resigned on Monday, and the party's lawmakers shut down parliament on Tuesday, gathering in the front of the assembly hall and chanting slogans.

    Maoist lawmaker Barsa Man Pun said the lawmakers would continue to block parliament proceedings, making it impossible for a new prime minister to be voted in.

    "There will be more protests until the president withdraws his unconstitutional decision," he said.

    The Maoists, who hold nearly 40 percent of the seats in parliament and retain considerable popular support, could make governing difficult for any new coalition if they are not brought onboard a new government.

    The street protests highlighted fears that Nepal could be plunged into unrest as it struggles to build a nascent republic after a decade-long civil war that cost around 13,000 lives.

    The moderate Communist UML party, a former Maoist ally and now the second biggest opposition group, says vigorous efforts were on to persuade the Maoists to return to the government.

    "There is no alternative to a national unity government without the Maoists in it. This is a reality," UML general secretary Ishwar Pokarel said. "We'll hold talks with them and try to form the government as soon as possible," he said.

    Writing the country's new constitution, a key part of a 2006 peace deal that ended the civil war three years ago, without the Maoists would also be difficult.

    "Without the participation of the Maoists in the government or their strong commitment to the peace process the writing of the new constitution will not be possible," political analyst Yubaraj Ghimire said.

    UML officials said their leader Jhal Nath Khanal met Prachanda on Wednesday, but no more details were given.

    The Maoists have said they would disrupt the parliamentary sittings until army chief General Rookmangud Katawal was sacked. They accused Gen. Katawal of undermining the authority of the civilian government.

    Business officials say the uncertainty would only deepen economic woes in a country already facing crippling power cuts, high inflation and food shortages.
     
  9. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    C UDAY BHASKAR

    The dramatic but not totally unexpected resignation of Nepalese prime minister Pushpa Kamal Dahal better known as Prachanda on Monday after a

    tense stand-off with President Ram Baran Yadav over the sacking of army chief General Rukmangad Katuwal points to the complex challenges that Nepal faces in its transition from a traditional monarchy to a nascent but viable democracy.

    Concurrently Nepal's geographical location between the two Asian giants India and China also introduces a subterranean element of power play. Both are interested in Nepal's internal affairs. This is further compounded by the long drawn out low-intensity conflict against the monarchy led by the Maoists that began in 1994 with the formation of the Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist) led by Prachanda.

    In this interregnum of 15 years leading to the present crisis, the powers that be in Kathmandu tried unsuccessfully to crush the Maoists with the help of the then Royal Nepalese Army. At the socio-political level, the increasing dissatisfaction with King Gyanendra's dictatorial rule resulted in the Maoists agreeing to a ceasefire and joining hands with the major political parties, thereby forcing the ouster of the monarch in April 2006. Over the next three years, Nepal one of the poorest countries in the world made an enormous leap by holding a historic election in April 2008, which the Maoists won decisively, against the received wisdom of the day. This democratic fervour resulted in the formal abolition of the monarchy a month later in May. Nepal became a republic.

    But in many ways that tectonic change also marked the beginning of the complex power-sharing arrangement. The Maoists, led by Prachanda, formed a coalition government that was entrusted with the task of steering the ship of state and drafting a constitution to anchor Nepal on a firm politico-legislative framework that would address its myriad diversities and inequities. Many of the constitutional checks and balances are still in a state of flux, most significantly the management of the tools of `legitimate' violence as represented by the Nepalese army (that had since dropped the prefix `Royal') and the 19,000 plus Maoist cadres who had kept the former at bay for over a decade.

    An integration plan had envisaged the gradual induction of the Maoists into the regular army and it is understood that Prachanda was unhappy with the manner in which the army chief was delaying the process. Specific incidents of the civil-military divergences included the recruitment of fresh troops into the army while the Maoist cadres remained in UN-supervised camps. The final straw came about earlier this week, culminating in the May 4 crisis, with the army chief being sacked by the PM ostensibly without consensus within the ruling coalition.

    With the resignation of Prachanda the current impasse will call for considerable politico-military sagacity, which till now appears elusive. As of now the Maoists have seized the high moral ground by seeming to forsake power on a matter of principle and are thus able to stoke nationalist sentiment. But they have not threatened to revert to violence yet, and therein lies a sliver of hope.

    In the prevailing political matrix of Nepal, the Maoists have to contend with the Nepali Congress (NC), the Communist Party of Nepal (CPN) UML, and the two `madhesi' parties and an uneasy coalition can be formed with the Maoists sitting in the opposition. It is pertinent that the CPN-UML, which was part of the Maoist-led coalition, distanced itself from the Prachanda decision to sack the army chief. This is indicative of the anxiety in many constituencies of Nepal about giving the army a Maoist ideological orientation.

    As in many developing nations that have an authoritative past, the army is the most powerful and credible institution and its location in the democratic edifice is critical. In a parliamentary form of government the institutional equipoise between the legislature, the executive and the judiciary is predicated upon the totally apolitical nature of the military and its implicit acceptance of civilian control. This is not easily achieved for a state making the transition from colonial rule or that of a traditional monarchical/feudal order as the South Asian experience demonstrates. In many ways India is the exception to the rule. Pakistan, Myanmar, Bangladesh and now Nepal are illustrative of the arduous Sisyphean nature of this socio-political transition.

    In the current situation, the not unfounded perception that the Maoists are more empathetic to China has caused some concern within Nepal and this is further amplified in India. The spectre of having to contend with a Pakistani military that has internalised support to terror and religious radicalism on one front while another military is being reshaped to include Maoists has all the makings of a worst-case scenario for the Indian security establishment. And to heighten New Delhi's anxiety, the fact that both these institutions have the tacit support of Beijing cannot be ignored.

    Nepal's political and military establishments are on a learning curve. They now have to deal with the tricky part of providing equitable, harmonious and sustainable governance. The Prachanda resignation could well serve as an inoculation that will allow for the necessary malleability to be introduced in Nepal's body politic.

    The writer is a Delhi-based security affairs analyst.
     
  10. Pintu

    Pintu New Member

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    BBC reports that Nepalese Maoist Leader and former Prime Minister Prachanda is in the Video leeking row .

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/8036368.stm


    Nepal Maoist leader in leak row
    Prachanda
    The Maoist leader says that he is the victim of vicious propaganda

    The outgoing Nepalese PM, Prachanda, has condemned the leaking of video footage in which he admits exaggerating the strength of his forces.

    Prachanda - who resigned on Monday - is accused of lying about his forces 18 months ago to have more bargaining power during peace negotiations.

    On Wednesday he condemned the leak as a propaganda ploy by his opponents.

    Meanwhile police in Kathmandu have used tear gas and bamboo sticks to break up a protest by Maoist supporters.

    They are unhappy about the collapse of the Maoist-led government on Monday, when Prachanda resigned over the president's decision to reinstate the sacked chief of the army.

    Speaking at a news conference in Kathmandu, Prachanda argued that the leaking of the tape was "a reactionary ploy to cover up the unconstitutional move of President Ram Baran Yadav and to jeopardise the peace process".

    However the Maoist leader reiterated his commitment to non-violence despite what he said were the the efforts of "some elements to push Nepal again towards war".

    The main opposition Nepali Congress party - which is now in talks with other parties to form a new coalition government - say that the release of the tape means that the Maoists have lost the right to lead the government.

    They say that the video shows the Maoist leader detailing his plans to establish "complete control over the army and seize state power".

    A Congress spokesman said that it was now necessary to review agreements by which former Maoist soldiers are integrated into the regular army.
     
  11. Pintu

    Pintu New Member

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    AFP reports that Maoists say that they will boycott new Nepalese Government.

    http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5gqOxzZ6EFVtTRclFbaMb8iq0H45w


    Maoists say will boycott new Nepal government

    1 hour ago

    KATHMANDU (AFP) — The leader of Nepal's Maoists said Wednesday his party would not take part in any new government unless the president backed down in a row over the sacking of the army chief.

    Maoist leader Prachanda resigned as prime minister on Monday after his attempt to fire the Himalayan nation's top general, a longtime rival, was vetoed by the president, who is a member of the main opposition party.

    "The president made an unconstitutional move challenging the civilian authority. It was unfortunate that the president blocked the decision of elected government," Prachanda told reporters.

    "Before talking about the formation of a new government, the unconstitutional move by the president should be corrected. Only then will we help in the process of forming a new government," he said.

    The Maoists tried to sack General Rookmangud Katawal for refusing to integrate thousands of their former fighters, currently confined to UN-supervised camps, into the regular army.

    The integration of the ex-rebels is a key part of a 2006 peace accord that ended a decade of civil war but the army views the guerrillas as politically indoctrinated and unfit for service.

    The Maoists also accuse the army, traditionally a bastion of support for Nepal's elite and the ousted monarchy, of having blocked reforms -- even though the ultra-leftists won landmark elections last year.

    With the country now without an effective government, a group of more than 20 parties, including the Nepali Congress and the centre-left UML -- the second and third-largest in parliament -- are trying to form a new "national government".

    But lacking the seats in parliament, they need the ex-rebels to take part.

    Prachanda said this would not happen, promising to press on with a campaign of street protests.

    "We will continue to protest in a peaceful way in order to establish civilian supremacy in the country," he said.

    "I believe that the new government will again be formed under the leadership of the Maoist party once the president's decision is reversed," he added, apparently confident of coming out on top of the political crisis.
     
  12. Pintu

    Pintu New Member

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    The Times of India reports that Maoists are forcing Indian companies to shut down and shifting their business from Nepal.

    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/...to-shut-shop-in-Nepal/articleshow/4492759.cms

    `Maoists forced Indian-owned cos to shut shop in Nepal'
    7 May 2009, 0118 hrs IST, TNN


    NEW DELHI: Much before the showdown between Nepal's Maoist premier and his army chief began leading to the former's resignation, the Left wing
    cadres had began forcing Indian-owned companies to shut down operations and shift businesses
    out of the Himalayan nation.

    Besides setting deadlines to others, the Maoist cadres, operating under the banner of Maoist Trade Union, had stopped work of an FMCG major in August last year. The employees of the company, owned and run by an Indian since 1989, were forced to leave the factory premises by Maoists and told not to report back for duty.

    The trouble for Indian enterprises began ever since the Maoist-led regime came to power. This despite the fact that many Indian companies had a labour pact and were assured of protection by the government under the local labour laws before they started operations.

    A report prepared by the Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industry (FICCI) has presented a very gloomy picture stating that "extortion, threat to life and property becomes the order of the day" for Indian investors and business community as Nepal drift towards political turmoil.

    "We propose to take up the matter with the authorities in Nepal so that industrial operations are resumed at the earliest which is in the interest of economic development of the region," said Amit Mitra, FICCI secretary general.

    A survey, conducted by the industry chambers on Indian enterprises in Nepal, said economy is grinding to a halt and unless corrective action is taken, it would result into large scale industrial sickness and unemployment.

    The FICCI report quotes a senior official of the Nepalese industry association as saying that the foreign investments have nearly dried and no new joint ventures are being worked out in the given scenario. He said the impact has been felt across sectors while the 15-day strike in the Terai region has already stymied supply of raw materials. The situation has been compounded by the sealing of the Indo-Nepal border.
     
  13. Pintu

    Pintu New Member

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  14. Pintu

    Pintu New Member

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    The Associated Press reports that Riot Police beat back Maoist protesters from in front of the Nepal's president's house.

    The Associated Press: Riot police beat back Maoist protests in Nepal

    Riot police beat back Maoist protests in Nepal

    By BINAJ GURUBACHARYA – 29 minutes ago

    KATMANDU, Nepal (AP) — Riot police beat back hundreds of women from Nepal's Maoist party who protested Thursday in front of the president's house to demand that he fire the country's army chief.

    Nepal's Prime Minister Pushpa Kamal Dahal — leader of the Maoist rebels who laid down arms three years ago — sparked a national crisis Monday when he resigned and pulled his party from the ruling coalition in protest over the army chief's failure to integrate his fighters into the military.

    Some 500 protesters from the women's wing of the Dahal party marched on President Ram Baran Yadav's residence Thursday, chanting slogans while police used bamboo batons to beat back activists who tried to break through a cordon. Some of the women were lightly injured.

    Separately, about 1,000 Maoist supporters marched in the center of Katmandu demanding Yadav's resignation. Waving their signature red flags, the protesters called Yadav a traitor. The march was peaceful but police kept close watch on the demonstration.

    Maoist supporters are angry that Yadav overruled Dahal on Sunday when the former prime minister tried to fire army chief Rookmangud Katawal.

    The tussle between the prime minister and president has shattered the Himalayan country's fragile stability — achieved after Maoist guerrillas ended their 10-year insurgency, laying down their arms and joining a political peace process.

    As part of that process, former rebels were supposed to be integrated into the national army, but many are still confined to their U.N.-monitored barracks.

    Dahal, a former insurgent leader, blamed the army chief for the continued sequestering of his fighters. He announced Wednesday that his party would only join a new government if the president supported the firing of Katawal.

    Dahal's party is the largest in parliament, but it does not have a clear majority to rule. The president belongs to the second-largest, the Nepali Congress party.

    Nepal's political parties were still trying to agree on a new coalition government. The Communist Party of Nepal (United Marxist Leninist), which is likely to lead the new government, said it preferred the inclusion of the Maoists.

    "If we are going to form the government of national unity, then the Maoists should also be part of the government," senior party leader Madhav Kumar Nepal told The Associated Press in an interview.

    "If the Maoists want to stay out and be the opposition playing a responsible role then it is also all right, but they have to be cooperate and they should be positive and not create any obstacles," said Kumar Nepal, who is the strongest candidate for the next prime minister.

    Kumar Nepal's party and the Maoists form two different communist parties.

    The Maoists have warned they will continue to demonstrate in the streets and in parliament to block a new prime minister from being voted in. They have stayed away from crisis talks attempting to form a new coalition government.

    The Maoists fought a bloody 10-year war before laying down their guns in 2006. They won the most votes during parliamentary elections last year and then abolished the centuries-old monarchy.
     
  15. Daredevil

    Daredevil On Vacation! Administrator

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    NEPAL: Non Maoist Parties Struggling to form a New Government

    NEPAL: Non Maoist Parties Struggling to form a New Government

    By Dr. S.Chandrasekharan.

    With the dead line passing without any understanding for a new government, President Ram Baran Yadav had to resort to Article 38 (2) of the Interim Constitution to call on the legislative Parliament to elect the Prime Minister. But with the continued obstructive tactics of the Maoists, the Parliament cannot even meet to elect a new Prime minister!

    It is five days now since Prachanda resigned and still the formation of a new government seems to be far away due to lack of a consensus amongst the non Maoists parties and the Maoist determination not to allow any initiative until the "unconstitutional order of the President is corrected."

    Maoists:

    There is no doubt that it was Prachanda who created the mess by unilaterally dismissing the CoAS without getting the "nod" from other coalition partners. The interim constitution does mention that on all major policy issues there should be a consensus. It cannot be denied that the sacking of the CoAS was a major issue. Did Prachanda have an ‘exit’ route in case the CoAS refuses to accept the order or refuses to lay down charge? Who will implement the order then? It is easy to precipitate a crisis but more difficult it is to get out of it.

    The Politburo meeting of the Maoists could not meet again on 10h and is scheduled to meet later. Prachanda the Maoist leader is said to be busy in meeting other political leaders of different parties "to forge a consensus" on a new government. The general consensus in the earlier meeting was to intensify the agitation.

    With their inflexible stand on the sacking of the CoAS, Prachanda’s statement to the Press two days ago that they would again lead the government in two days appears to be more intended for his own cadres than for other parties.

    Post Bogati, a senior member of the Maoists, declared that they would neither let the parliament function nor take any initiative to form a new government unless their demands are met. ( which includes withdrawal of the order of the President on CoAS)

    While the Maoists are going about as if nothing has happened, the tape of Prachanda’s speech is agitating many political leaders. There is a demand for re verification by the UNMIN. A senior leader Dr. Ram Sharan Mahat has called it a betrayal by the United Nations. In addition to the three other issues, Prachanda has also told the cadres that the PLA in the cantonments will be used to prepare for revolt and ultimate capture of the State. These were his intentions a year and a half ago and nothing has happened to change his mind. So much for their trustworthiness and for those who signed and facilitated the twelve point agreement in 2005!

    As expected, the ire of the Maoists has turned on India. Has he been told that he will not have Indian support in case he goes for confrontation with the Nepalese Army? The media has also followed suit in publishing many anti Indian articles. While accusing the political parties of being influenced by foreign reactionary forces, Prachanda said the parties are also undermining the civilian authority by helping foreign reactionary forces.

    The UML:

    In one sense the CPN (UML) is equally responsible for the current mess. It is said that their chairman Jhalanath Khanal had informally told Prachanda that they would back the dismissal of the CoAS, but their standing committee decided otherwise. Instead of supporting Pracahnda they withdrew from the government. Having made the government a minority one, the President had good reason to countermand the dismissal of the CoAS.

    Egged on by the Nepali Congress, the UML on 9th May took the decision to head the government and seek the help of other political parties that included the CPN Maoists, the MJF and the TMLP.

    The Maoists are not going to oblige easily. The party is also vertically split in their policy towards the Maoists with Khanal and Bam Dev Gautam favouring cooperation with the Maoists while K.P. Oli and former Secretary Madhav Nepal against any accommodation. There could be a race for Prime minister ship between Khanal and Madhav Nepal.

    The MJF:

    The MJF continues to play the role of a "cat on the wall" and the party is also split over this issue.

    Their Chairman Upendra Yadav would like to favour the Maoists while others, like Gachedar wants the UML to lead the government

    The other Madhesi party having a sizeable number is the TMDP. They also appear to be in favour of UML leading the government.

    On one issue all the Madhesi parties are united in that the new government should address the Madhesi issues first and that includes the eight point agreement reached earlier with the Koirala government.

    Indian Position:

    While the Indian Prime Minister reiterated even today that the developments in Nepal are an internal matter, the stakes for India are very high. The open meetings of the Indian Ambassador with all those involved have also come in for criticism. To add to this, has been the reported visit of senior Indian foreign intelligence officials to Kathmandu to study the situation. If it is true, it was unwise. Also the visit should have been a secret if at all it was necessitated. One may recall earlier the visit of the R&AW chief whose signed landing card was published in the local press!

    It should be no surprise that India would have liked the status quo to be maintained. The hardening of position of the Maoists has complicated the issue. The UML now feels that it is their chance to lead the government!

    There is the danger of the developments being diverted to an anti Indian agitation. Those who complain about Indian interference should know what they did and where, when the 12 point agreement was finalised.

    Conclusion:

    There is no easy way and as said earlier, the Maoists are unlikely to throw away all the gains they have made since the 12 point agreement. The emergence of the tape has complicated the issue of the integration process. The demand for re verification will intensify as the government funds have been misused for the inflated numbers of the PLA! No one knows how much of the salaries meant for the PLA cadres were actually disbursed to them.

    The true face of the Maoists is seen now. Misuse of payments to the so-called martyrs will also have to be sorted out. It looks that the Maoists have not given up their old ways. Their muscle power is being seen even now.

    Will they allow a non Maoist ministry now to see the peace process through and finalise the constitution? I have my doubts.

    NEPAL:  Non Maoist Parties Struggling to Form a New Government- Update No. 191
     
  16. dave lukins

    dave lukins Defence Professionals Defence Professionals

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    Brigadier Sir..Naxal(naxalite) is a new word to me, but as you know my methods, I have hunted it down and see that it originated from West Bengal. What more can you tell me about 'naxal'?

    Hakuna Matata
     
  17. Rage

    Rage DFI TEAM Stars and Ambassadors

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    Indian-origin leader may be new Nepal PM

    11 May 2009, 0927 hrs IST, TNN


    KATHMANDU: As Nepal's warring parties failed to come up with a consensus government by Saturday, embattled President Ram Bran Yadav on Sunday took recourse to the other constitutional option and asked interim parliament to elect a new prime minister on the basis of simple majority.

    However, it is easier said than done with the Maoists keeping up their obstruction of the house. The former guerrillas, who began disrupting interim parliament following the resignation of their chief Pushpa Kamal Dahal Prachanda as prime minister last week, stormed the rostrum even on Sunday, forcing the chairman to put off the session till Tuesday.

    Now with the house in uproar, it would be impossible to hold a prime ministerial election if the Maoists stay on the warpath. The Communist Party of Nepal-Unified Marxist Leninist (UML), that has staked claim on the new government, announced the formation of a nine-member panel to start negotiating with the major parties.

    UML chief Jhalanath Khanal, who had been speculated to be the next PM, on Sunday however proposed veteran party leader and former home minister Madhav Kumar Nepal for the post. 56-year-old Nepal had quit as party chief last year after being defeated in the constituent assembly election from both his constituencies.

    While the UML held talks with the main opposition party, the Nepali Congress (NC), the Maoists have vowed to continue obstructing the house as well as keep up public protests till their arch enemy, army chief Gen Rookmangud Katawal, is sacked. The Maoist government fell last week trying to fire Katawal, who was reinstated by the president in his role as the custodian of the constitution.

    With uncertainty and turmoil gripping the nation for almost a week now, the Maoists suffered a second blow on Sunday when the Supreme Court refused to sack eight more army generals. Last month, the former rebels tried to retire eight brigadier-generals, ignoring the recommendation by the army that their terms be extended.

    But the generals went to court to fight the move and the court asked for a stay till it resolved the row. Though the Maoist government tried to have the stay vacated, a two-judge bench on Sunday rejected the request.



    Indian-origin leader may be new Nepal PM - South Asia - World - The Times of India

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    Shri Madhav Kumar Nepal

    [​IMG]
     
  18. Rage

    Rage DFI TEAM Stars and Ambassadors

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    Madhav Kumar Nepal elected new Nepal PM

    May 23, 2009

    [​IMG]

    Veteran Communist leader Madhav Kumar Nepal was on Saturday elected unopposed as the prime minister of Nepal, bringing to an end the nearly three-week long political crisis in the country.

    The 56-year-old Communist Party of Nepal (Unified Marxist Leninist) leader, who claims to have the support of 351 lawmakers in the 601-member Constituent Assembly, was the only candidate to have filed the nomination for the top post.

    The Maoists boycotted the voting process and said they will not join the new government. Caretaker premier and Maoist supremo Prachanda and Maoist number two leader Baburam Bhattarai were absent during the parliament session today.

    Nepal will replace Prachanda who had resigned as premier on May 4, in the wake of differences with President Ram Baran Yadav on the issue of sacking of the army chief. Nepali Congress President Girija Prasad Koirala proposed 56-year-old Nepal's name for the post and CPN-UML Chairman Jhalanath Khanal seconded it along with representatives from 22 different parties, including key Madhesi group MPRF. Speaker Subhas Nemwang declared Nepal as elected.

    Nepal, whose family migrated from Bihar to Nepal more than 200 years ago, was a former deputy prime minister in a nine-month government led by Communist Party of Nepal-United Marxist Leninist in 1994-95. He had led the party for 15 years, between 1993 and 2008.

    Nepal, who resigned from the party post on April 12, 2008 taking moral responsibility for the electoral debacle, has now staged a comeback and that too in the top echelons of power. The man, who has been the head of the main Constitution Drafting Committee, faces a series of challenges -- taking the peace process forward, rewriting the statute and consolidating democracy in the country that abolished its 240-year monarchy last year to become a republic.

    As prime minister, Nepal will also have to tackle the Maoists, who are sulking after being pushed out of power. The former rebels on Friday ended their three-week blockade of Parliament, paving the way for the election of the new premier. Delivering his valedictory address, Prachanda had said his attempt to redefine the country's traditional ties with India and China had led to the fall of his government.

    He had earlier accused India of interfering in Nepal's internal affairs, during the standoff with the army chief. Speaking in Parliament today, former premier and Nepali Congress leader Koirala asked Prachanda to cooperate with the new government in its task of writing the constitution and taking the peace process to its logical end.

    "The current state of political stalemate has arrived as we failed to move ahead by forging cooperation, collaboration and unity among all parties," Koirala said.

    He said the government will formulate a high-level political mechanism to steer and guide the new coalition and asked leaders of various political parties, including Prachanda, to take part in it.

    Deputy leader of Maoist parliamentary party Narayankaji Shrestha 'Prakash' said his party decided to boycott the election process as its demand to rectify the move of the President to reinstate the army chief was not heeded to.

    "But we will not run away from the responsibility of the peace process and drafting the new constitution," he said.

    Prakash also alleged that the new government is being formed as per the "design and wishes of the colonial and expansionist forces outside the country and reactionary forces within the country".


    Shirish B Pradhan in Kathmandu


    Madhav Kumar Nepal elected new Nepal PM: Rediff.com news


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    Nepal continues to be an undeclared colony of India: Outgoing PM Dahal

    TGW
    2009-05-23 08:35:28


    The outgoing Prime Minister of Nepal Mr. Pushpa Kamal Dahal in his Friday, May 22, 2009, speech made in front of the crowd of six hundred and one member constituent assembly members gave no solution to the nation engulfed in crisis, he rather injected, fear among the population.

    That, Madhav Nepal and his New Delhi lobbyists wanted Dahal to go at any cost, the questions that is being asked in Kathmandu streets is whether a government without the Maoists will live for full term? What could have been the strategy to alienate the Maoists party that has the largest peoples’ mandate and where all these new political developments lead the nation towards is still unpredictable?

    Whether Prachanda lived in New Delhi suburbs or the Maoists’ rebellion had tacit Indian support to destabilize Nepal, in all, is likely to make no difference now, but the most important part of the fresh political overture is that Peoples’ elected Prime Minister of Nepal who could not resist the Indian Interference had to resign? Dahal has time and again admitted this in public that he has been the victim of the Indian manipulation.

    On Friday Prime Minister Dahal once again said that since the signing of the infamous Sugauli Treaty in 1816, Nepal has remained as an undeclared colony of India and will perhaps continue to remain the same.

    “We have failed to clearly redefine and develop our relations with India as per the changing political situation”, Dahal admitted.

    “There is the threat that Nepal’s relations with India will once again take the traditional form and be based on big brother small brother phenomenon.”

    “I tried though, to redefine our relations with India, the present situation is the result of that…my ideas collided with the domestic traditional forces, traditional approaches and the traditional mindset”.

    Prime Minister Dahal also said that the NC-UML led 22-Parties Alliance which toppled the Maoists’ nine month rule had received signal from outside (implied India).

    “They spread rumors of Maoists’ party led State capture that was baseless; we will now show them how to capture the State openly…we will do it in the open stating it in advance”.

    “A person summarily rejected by the people (implied Mr. Nepal) is to lead the next government which is the naked and the disfigured type of the counter revolution”

    The infuriated Prime Minister also said that the government formation process gave a dramatic look, and the next government will be a puppet one”.

    In all, Dahal’s highly charged lecture at the CA on Friday gave a pretty bleak picture for the country in the days ahead.

    Though Dahal committed himself to draft the new constitution and the conclusion of the peace process, his infuriated face however, suggested that the Maoists could go on the rampage and the likelihood of further ferocious violence remains in the pipeline.

    Experts however, claim that sidelined Maoists leadership could soon revive their Peoples’ Government and reactivate what they call People’s Court nicknamed Kangaroo Court, which in all is an undeclared rebellion round the corner.


    Telegraph Nepal : Nepal continues to be an undeclared colony of India: PM Dahal
     
  19. Rage

    Rage DFI TEAM Stars and Ambassadors

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    India encroaches Nepal’s territory: destroys 264 pillars: Maoists, IRHRC allege

    May 20, 2009 at 05:08 am


    While Nepalis in Indo-Nepal border areas have been frequently complaining of border encroachment by India, the International Relations and Human Rights Committee (IRHRC) under Nepal’s Legislative Parliament has found a serious level of border encroachment by India in Nepal’s Bara district.

    A field study headed by the Committee’s Chairman and Constituent Assembly Member Nabindra Raj Joshi three days ago has revealed that India has encroached Nepal’s border by destroying 264 border pillars out of 685.

    The IRHRC Chairman Nabindra Raj Joshi informed reporters that India has also erected buildings in Nepal’s territory.
    Because Nepal’s Maoists tried to resist direct Indian interference in appointing temple’s priest and Army Chief, India has been openly exercising to re-consolidate in its favor the Nepal-based forces servile to it since long.

    Nepalis’ international lobbying for the sake of their national sovereignty and independence is extremely weak due to deep-seated servile character of various intellectual and political forces in the country.

    Ordinary masses strongly believe that the chief political leaders of the Nepali Congress (NC) and the Unified Marxist-Leninist (UML) are completely manipulated by Indian rulers.


    India encroaches Nepal?s territory: destroys 264 pillars | NowPublic News Coverage
     
  20. Rage

    Rage DFI TEAM Stars and Ambassadors

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    Nepal says no encroachment by India

    Friday, June 5, 2009 : 2330 Hrs


    Kathmandu (PTI): Nepal on Friday dismissed reports of encroachment by the Indian Army in the border district of Dang region, saying as per preliminary findings the government has not found any evidence in this regard.

    Foreign Minister Sujata Koirala after a meeting with Indian Ambassador to Nepal Rakesh Sood told reporters that as per preliminary reports the government has not found any encroachment and harassment by Indian security forces as reported by media in Dang.

    The government has sent a team to investigate the matter and so far as our information, no such thing has come out, she said.

    Mr. Sood said the allegation was totally false and fabricated, some people are deliberately spreading the rumour to disturb the friendly ties between the two neighbouring countries.

    He asked the Nepalese government to investigate into the matter.


    The Hindu News Update Service
     

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