Nepal : China cuts down India's Influence

Discussion in 'Subcontinent & Central Asia' started by Singh, Apr 23, 2009.

  1. Mohan

    Mohan Respected Member

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    Its good for India that Prachanda is gone before he could do something against India. Now India has to formulate a plan and keep the Maoists at the bay,so that Prachanda doesnt go back to his old ways and become a dictator or like a military junta in Myanmar backed by China.Which is or might be another nightmare for India.

    I feel this the right time for propaganda and breaking the maoists.They are weak now and we should act and stamp them out with coercive acts.
     
  2. Rage

    Rage DFI TEAM Stars and Ambassadors

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    Govt asks SSB to step up vigil at Indo-Nepal border

    4 May 2009, 1748 hrs IST, PTI

    NEW DELHI: In the wake of the political crisis in neighbouring Nepal, the Union home ministry has directed SSB, the border guarding force to remain on high alert.

    The force has been asked to step up vigil along the 1,751-kilometre Indo-Nepal border, a senior home ministry official said.

    According to an SSB official at the headquarters here, orders have been issued to field formations to heighten vigisl and check any possible attempts of infiltrations.

    The political crisis in the Himalayan nation deepened with the Maoists terming President Ram Baran Yadav's directive that sacked Army Chief General Rukmangad Katawal should continue in office as a "constitutional coup" and threatened to move court against it.


    Govt asks SSB to step up vigil at Indo-Nepal border - India - The Times of India
     
  3. ShyAngel

    ShyAngel Founding Member

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    Nepal was a democratic nation before Maoists took over the nation. It's like UK, being a democratic nation and yet the queen still has power. So it was a similar political case in Nepal. The country was in OK situation when G. P. Koirala served as democratic president for very long term and we still have our real king and queen who also had lots of power. I don't see any reason why Prachanda wanted the nation to be communist. I guess to put the country in even worst situation and him wanting to make money out of it. Koiralas always knew that this ideology of communist will not work in long term. The whole democrat politician knew that Prachanda will be there only for the short term, to destroy and to rob the nation. If Prachanda was a true servant of his common people, he wouldn't give up that easily. He just got what he wanted and now he's done with the game. I just felt sorry for those stupid people who followed him. They're in no where now! May there be peace and better future for the people in Nepal.
     
  4. ShyAngel

    ShyAngel Founding Member

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    He has no right to be the military junta in Myanmar, since he is not burmes or the people of Myanmar. How can he lead the nation when he wasn't even the citizen of that nation at 1st place. Actually, its not just him the whole nepalese hate indian and india for no reason. They thinks India will take over their pahar sometimes. I mean who in world will have any interest in taking over nation that has nothing but hills all over. Hill doesn't produce anything but may be just rice. And plus india is not lack of their own rice, so why would India ever bother to take over their country. It's so stupid. They even call indians by Dhoti.

    P.S. You said military junta I was thinking about military Nehta in my mind. So my bad!
     
  5. Mohan

    Mohan Respected Member

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    oops i think you misunderstood my post:blum3:
     
  6. ShyAngel

    ShyAngel Founding Member

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    Oh no! I was reciprocating Yusaf sir's post. No idea how I quote it under your post.
    Ops! Now what should I do? Do you think any of our supervisor in here be able to
    fix this mess? hehe


    :(
     
  7. ShyAngel

    ShyAngel Founding Member

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    Ok that wasn't a mistake! It was you who I was trying to quote on not yusaf sir. So its cool.....but I didn't misunderstood your post.
     
  8. Mohan

    Mohan Respected Member

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    :2guns: its ok
     
  9. Pintu

    Pintu New Member

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    Nepal Prime Minister Pushpa Kamal Dahal resigns:

    http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-fg-nepal-resign5-2009may05,0,3071199.story



    Nepal prime minister resigns
    Nepal prime minister
    Email Picture
    Binod Joshi / Associated Press
    Nepal's Prime Minister Pushpa Kamal Dahal makes a speech about his resignation, in Katmandu, Nepal, today.
    'Infant democracy' is rocked by the showdown between the prime minister and the country's president, who clashed over the firing of the head of the army.
    By Mark Magnier
    8:11 AM PDT, May 4, 2009
    Reporting from Islamabad, Pakistan -- Nepal's prime minister announced his resignation today on national television, setting off a political crisis in the young democracy and evoking unpleasant memories of riots and protracted street demonstrations in late 2006.

    The showdown has been brewing for weeks, but came to a head Sunday when Prime Minister Pushpa Kamal Dahal of the majority Maoist party fired the head of the army.

    At issue was an earlier agreement under which former Maoist militants would be allowed to join the army. The military has strongly resisted this move, prompting Dahal's decision to sack the top officer.

    The direct challenge didn't sit well with President Ram Baran Yadav, who officially leads the army, prompting him to block the firing. This in turn prompted other political parties within the ruling coalition to withdraw their support today, leading to the prime minister's resignation.

    "It looks like the government made some mistakes and the president's side made some mistakes," Sadhana Ghimire, a professor with the Kathmandu School of Law, said in a telephone interview. "It may play out in parliament or on the street. We'll have to see what happens."

    In his resignation speech, Dahal said he was leaving to "create a conducive environment and save the peace process," adding that the president's actions in reinstating army chief Rookmangud Katawal were a "fatal attack on the infant democracy."

    If the standoff isn't resolved quickly with some compromise on both sides, however, analysts fear the broader peace deal could be in jeopardy. That accord ended a decade-long civil war and brought the Maoists out of the jungle and into the government.

    After the prime minister's announcement today, authorities placed a ban on protests in parts of Katmandu, including areas around the president's residence and office, while police in riot gear were deployed across the city.

    This followed demonstrations on Sunday, when thousands of pro-army and pro-Maoist protesters hit the streets, burning tires, chanting and waving banners.

    So far the two sides haven't clashed directly, but authorities said they weren't taking any chances.

    "We are expecting trouble and are prepared to stop violence in the streets," Home Ministry official Navin Ghimire said in a statement. "Policemen are on high alert and will be mobilized throughout the capital."

    The situation won't be easy to resolve, analysts said. Under the agreements that ended the civil war, 20,000 Maoist troops should have been merged with the Nepalese army, considered loyal to the deposed king.

    But the army has a deep distrust of the Maoist fighters after years of tough fighting. There are also sensitive social issues. The army draws its ranks from higher castes, while most of the Maoists have more impoverished, rural and lower-caste roots.

    And the army feels it would lose its professionalism if it combines with the ex-guerrilla fighters, even as the fighters bridle at being treated like second-class citizens in a government they've joined and have headed.

    "It makes for quite a volatile mix," Sujeet Dutta, a senior fellow with the Institute for Defense Studies and Analyses in New Delhi, said in a telephone interview. "As the crisis lingers, it will lead to street agitation. Not necessarily guerrilla action but more street violence on both sides."

    Some analysts predicted the Maoist government will fall. Adding to these woes, Nepal has battled economic ills, including power outages lasting more than 16 hours a day; fuel shortages, leading to long lines at gas stations; and rising food prices.

    Dahal's political base is also at stake since he promised the former fighters they would receive high-paying, high-status positions in the military.

    In a further sleight, the army recently enlisted 3,000 new recruits without considering the Maoists, who have been waiting three years in barracks monitored by the United Nations. Katawal, the army chief, has argued that the former rebels remained indoctrinated and are therefore unfit to join his service.

    [email protected]
     
  10. Pintu

    Pintu New Member

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    Self Deleted
     
  11. Pintu

    Pintu New Member

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    A report on Ram Baran Yadav, The Nepali President

    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/...ho-defied-the-Maoists/articleshow/4483106.cms


    Ram Baran Yadav: The man who defied the Maoists
    4 May 2009, 1912 hrs IST, TNN


    KATHMANDU: Last year, Ram Baran Yadav, a Madhesi doctor from the restive Terai plains, made history when he became the first president of a newly
    republic Nepal, replacing deposed king Gyanendra as the constitutional head of state.

    A former health minister, the 60-year-old became the Nepali Congress party’s surprise candidate for the presidential race after the Maoists refused to nominate NC chief and former prime minister Girija Prasad Koirala due to fears that he would try to set himself up as a parallel power centre, cramping the style of the Maoist-led government.

    Blog: South Block screwed up BIG

    The fears came true Sunday after Yadav countermanded the ruling Maoists’ order to sack army chief Gen Rookmangud Katawal and ordered him to continue in his post. In doing so, the president has triggered a debate as to whether he stepped out of his ceremonial role. While the Maoists are accusing him of committing a coup against the constitution, a defiant Yadav on Monday defended his role by issuing a press statement in which he said it was within his rights as the custodian of the constitution and supreme commander of the army.

    Yadav, once the Man Friday of Koirala who refused to leave the party and join the Madhesi movement, still retains strong links with the NC though he resigned as an NC lawmaker after becoming president. His son Chandra Mohan Yadav was fielded by the NC during this year’s byelections from his constituency. However, the president’s son was rejected by the voter and came a poor third.

    It was anticipated that Yadav would oppose the Maoist decision since the NC was against it. His work became easier after the Maoists’ allies also protested and 18 parties petitioned him to halt the Maoist order.

    Besides the parties, Yadav also drew support from the international community. A group of eight countries, including India, the US, UK and China, had asked Prachanda not to fire Katawal.

    But his defiance has made Yadav the new target of the Maoists, who are planning to impeach him. The former rebels will also try to mobilise public opinion against the first president. Whatever his motive, Yadav however creates a negative precedent of the head of state locking horns with the executive and that too on an issue as sensitive as the army.
     
  12. Rage

    Rage DFI TEAM Stars and Ambassadors

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  13. Pintu

    Pintu New Member

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    You are right RAGE, this two threads need to be merged.

    I should have look the thread started by Yusuf, before posting.

    Regards
     
  14. Pintu

    Pintu New Member

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    PTI reports that crisis in Nepal hits India's plan for recruiting Gurkhas in Indian Army.


    http://www.ptinews.com/pti\ptisite.nsf/0/553E0C996B64C2DB652575AC0051BE28?OpenDocument

    Nepal crisis hits India's plans to recruit Gorkhas in Army



    New Delhi, May 4 (PTI) The worsening political crisis in Nepal has badly hit Indian Army's plans to recruit Gorkhas from the Himalayan nation into its infantry battalions this year, following a two-year lull, to fill up vacancies.
    Army sources said here today that it had chalked out plans for enlisting Gorkhas from Nepal into seven Gorkha Rifles regiments, but the present crisis had led it to review the plans.

    "Currently there are about 1,500 vacancies for Gorkhas from Nepal in the 35 battalions of 800-men each from the seven Gorkha Rifles regiments. But this crisis has led us to a rethink. It would be difficult to carry out the recruitment rallies at Dharan in eastern Nepal and Pokhara in central Nepal, which are the two recruitment centres for Gorkhas," sources said.

    About two years ago, at the height of Maoists insurgency in Nepal, India had stopped its recruitment rallies in the Himalayan kingdom.

    After the Pushp Kamal Dahal 'Prachanda' led Maoists were voted to power in the first democratic elections last year, he had stated that Gorkhas from Nepal should not get recruited into the Indian Army. PTI
     
  15. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    Prachanda would have been a headache if he had stayed for too long. A puppet Chinese regime there would have turned into a security nightmare for us as well. Not only from the Chinese but also from the Maoists who would have helped the Naxals in our own territory.
    I would consider this as a good win for Indian arm twisting. India has to now consolidate and make sure these commies dont make any sort of a comeback. India has to learn the game to make use of small states to extend its own influence.
     
  16. Flint

    Flint Senior Member Senior Member

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    Of course he'll make a comeback. Its India who cajoled the Maoists into fighting elections rather than fighting a war.

    Now we have two massive armed groups - the maoists and the Nepalese army, who were fighting each other not too long ago, and whose ideologies and loyalties are totally out of sync.
    Prachanda wants the Nepalese army to absorb the Maoist cadres and appoint a pro-Maoist General to retrain and remould the army according to his wishes, so obviously India and the pro-India parties are livid because such a scenario would spell disaster for India, what with Maoist armies growing in strength in India and the increase of Chinese influence over the subcontinent.
     
  17. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    To that extent it really surprises me that he resigned and did not stay put. I thought he might wriggle out of the situation by some deft maneuvering. Now that he has resigned, all those opposed to the Maoists will jump all over them.
    As far as strategies go, i feel it was a blunder on behalf of Prachanda to resign.
     
  18. Vinod2070

    Vinod2070 मध्यस्थ Stars and Ambassadors

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    Threads merged.
     
  19. Pintu

    Pintu New Member

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    A report from MYREPUBLICA.com on the impact on Nepal Army Head Quarter:

    http://www.myrepublica.com/portal/index.php?action=news_details&news_id=4664

    Business as usual at NA HQ


    AKANSHYA SHAH
    KATHMANDU, May 4: The political turn of events have put the Nepal Army (NA) at complete ease. It was business as usual at NA headquarter on Monday with both General Rookmangud Katawal and General Kul Bahadur Khadka resuming their respective works.

    As per the direction of the president in his capacity as the Supreme Commander of NA, both the generals have resumed routine duties and the chain of command, which would have otherwise been changed had the President not stepped in, is now back on track, the Directorate of Public Relation (DPR) of NA said.

    With President Dr Ram Baran Yadav´s letter reaching the NA late on Sunday, the DPR informed that General Katawal remains the chief of staff and General Khadka has resumed work as the second in command in the army hierarchy.

    "General Katawal came to his office early Monday and gave operational briefing to the PSO officers," a close confidant of Katawal told myrepublica.com.

    The source also informed that no meeting or consultations were held between General Katawal and General Khadka regarding the Prime Minister´s resignation, nor did the two initiated talks with the top army brass on the changed political situation facing the country.

    However, General Khadka is believed to have met with two NA officers and held consultation for almost an hour.

    "General Khadka met with Major General Nepal Bhushan Chand and Brigadier General BA Kumar Sharma on Monday morning. The talks revolved around the president´s directive. But no further deliberations were held with the other top ranking officers the whole day," another NA source said.

    Chand is chief of Adjutant General´s Office and Sharma is the chief of legal department of the NA.

    Responding to a query, the source labeled the rumor of General Khadka going on leave as ´false.´ He said, "There is no talk of the General going on leave in the near future. Some newspapers raised this issue baselessly."

    The Brigadier Generals who were called for several rounds of meetings with General Katawal on Sunday for consultations have said that the NA remains committed to the civilian supremacy exercised by a legitimately elected government. However, there were disagreement among them on the constitutionality and legality of the Prime Minister´s move to sack the Army Chief. They had said ´much will depend on the political parties´ reaction to the matter.´

    But with the ousting of the Maoist-led government and the president´s order for Katawal to continue in his post have cleared the uncertainty that was looming in NA for the last two weeks.

    [email protected]



    Published on 2009-05-04 23:30:01
     
  20. Daredevil

    Daredevil On Vacation! Administrator

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    So how does Nepal (or India) going to control the fallout of resignation of Prachanda and the subsequent unrest and fighting from the Maoist guerillas. They will be back to old ways and will try to make situation as worse as possible for Nepal.
     

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