Indo-Russian Relations

Discussion in 'Foreign Relations' started by A.V., Feb 18, 2009.

  1. prohumanity

    prohumanity Senior Member Senior Member

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    Americans are good people but truly unfortunate because they end up with really undeserving,low quality leaders.
    The leaders are so unworthy of this great nation that it is just sad.
    Also, seems there is a "deep state" who controls the elected leaders . That's why whether its is Obama or Trump..they end up toeing the same line...to create and propagate Wars...use small nations against big as proxies and keep the World in eternal turmoil.
    A multi-polar world order is absolutely needed to keep checks and balances on the unlimited power of a hegemonistic nation. I see some movement in the direction of a multipolar world lately with leaders of China, Russia, India, France and Germany meeting and interacting frequently.
     
  2. Jumbo

    Jumbo Regular Member

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    Band performing at the Red Square, Moscow.
    Listen to the last lines, you will be pleasantly surprised
    ...….

     
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2018
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  3. AMCA

    AMCA Senior Member Senior Member

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    Combined Armed forces band of India playing jimmy jimmy and sare jahan se acha.........................Jimmy Jimmy and Mera juta hai japani were superhit songs in USSR and are still very popular.


     
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  4. kunal1123

    kunal1123 Regular Member

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    Russia, Pakistan naval cooperation accord causes anxiety in Delhi – Indian Defence Research Wing
    3 minutes
    SOURCE: The Statesman

    [​IMG]

    In what is causing concern in strategic circles in New Delhi, Russia, the most important defence ally of India, has signed an agreement with Pakistan for naval cooperation.The MoU between the two countries, which were once considered bitter rivals, was inked during the visit of Pakistan Vice Chief of Naval Staff, Vice Admiral Kaleem Shaukat to the Russian Federation.

    A Pakistani spokesperson said the MoU would help expand the existing naval cooperation between the two countries, toiling to find new allies in the region.

    The two countries are also believed to have exchanged views on professional matters and security situation in the Indian Ocean.

    The MoU comes close on the heels an accord between the two countries in April to enhance cooperation in the training of armed forces personnel in the naval field and conduct of wide range of joint military exercises.

    Pakistan has lately been turning towards Russia in terms of military support after US President Donald Trump halted the aid to the country in his new year’s tweet.

    India has been quite concerned over Moscow’s growing fondness for Pakistan, especially in the defence field since most of the military equipment with Indian forces is of the Russian origin.

    A source, who did not wish to be identified, said India had already conveyed its view on Russia’s cooperation with Pakistan to Moscow. ‘’We have a special and strong relationship with Russia…they (Russians) have assured us that they will not do anything inimical to our interests,’’ the source added. Moscow has also assured New Delhi that it would not sell any arms to Pakistan.

    Russia had for the first time conducted a joint military exercise with Pakistan in September 2016 focusing on counter-terrorism operations. Thereafter, it also conducted its first-ever foreign office level consultations with Pakistan on regional issues in December 2016, much to the discomfiture of New Delhi.

    India is also disturbed that both Russia and Pakistan are on the same page as far as dealing with the Taliban in Afghanistan is concerned.
     
  5. aarav

    aarav जय परशुराम‍। Senior Member

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    :::::::::;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;///////////;;;;;;;;;;;;;;deleted
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2018
  6. aarav

    aarav जय परशुराम‍। Senior Member

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    It’s time India got real about its ties with Russia
    There is little indication that Putin views India in sentimental terms, unlike an earlier generation of Russian officials exemplified by Yevgeny Primakov or Alexander Kadakin.

    In India, we often poke fun at Pakistani depictions of their relationship with China. The two countries’ ties — including nuclear and missile cooperation after the 1970s and the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) — are regularly described in baroque termsby them: “iron brothers” whose friendship is “higher than the mountains, deeper than the oceans.” Yet it’s clear that China has rarely bailed Pakistan out from a tight spot. During the Kargil War in 1999, Beijing criticised Pakistani adventurism and recklessness and has subsequently snubbed Pakistani requests for financial bailouts, as in 2008.

    While Pakistan’s faith in China may at times seem naïve, there are sometimes echoes of it in Indian characterisations of relations with Russia. Diplomatic niceties aside, India-Russia ties have always been transactional.

    India’s relations with the Soviet Union were slow to take off after independence. Anxiety about Soviet support for domestic communist revolutionaries led to an Indian wariness that only began to subside in the mid-1950s. Joseph Stalin’s death in 1953 paved the way for Moscow to provide economic and technical assistance to non-communist countries such as India. At the same time, the US and UK roped Pakistan into the Baghdad and Manila Pacts. Only then did India begin to align with Soviet positions on international diplomatic matters, such as the Hungarian Revolution of 1956. (At the time, Indian journalists lambasted New Delhi’s position as shameful sycophancy to the Soviet rulers and kowtowing.) After some initial Russian defence purchases in the late 1950s, India agreed to buy MiG-21 aircraft in 1961, facilitated by technology transfers and mindful of deterring China. Indo-Soviet defence ties accelerated after the United States suspended military assistance to both India and Pakistan during the 1965 war.

    But despite this growing bonhomie, Moscow’s support for India was never unconditional. After some hints of neutrality, the USSR eventually leaned towards Beijing during the 1962 India-China war, in part to ensure its support during the Cuban missile crisis. After 1965, the Soviet Union positioned itself as a neutral broker between India and Pakistan, hosting the summit at Tashkent and even supplying military assistance to Pakistan in 1968.

    Relations assumed a clearer direction with the 1971 Indo-Soviet Treaty of Friendship and Cooperation (modelled on a similar arrangement between the USSR and Egypt), which was prompted by the US-China rapprochement and their support for Pakistan. As a consequence, India’s defence ties with the USSR deepened and cooperation eventually extended to the war in Afghanistan. The relationship also broadened: by the early 1990s, the Soviet Union was India’s largest trade partner and Indian students of medicine and engineering had gone in sizeable numbers to the Soviet republics. Still, ties remained business-like: India regularly rebuffed Soviet attempts at closer military contacts. Later, in the 1990s, Russia initially joined the United States and China in condemning India’s nuclear tests.

    Today, the relationship has become one-dimensional, centred on arms sales by Russia to India. Between 2000 and 2014, 73% of India’s imported military equipment came from Russia. But India’s imports from Russia halved overnight following its annexation of Crimea in 2014, and have remained lower at about 50-60% amid international sanctions. Meanwhile, overall India-Russia trade has been slight, rising from $6 billion in 2014 to $10.7 billion this year. Although energy relations are deepening, the overall economic relationship remains narrow, not helped by the poor performance of the Russian economy. Just five years ago, Russia’s GDP was 20% larger than India’s; today, India’s is 70% larger than Russia’s.

    Under these circumstances, what explains India’s high-profile and sustained engagement with Russia this year? One, India still needs Russia for military spare parts just as Moscow needs New Delhi for revenue. Two, there are certain technologies that Russia is willing to provide — such as nuclear-powered submarines — that the likes of the United States never will. The defence relationship will therefore remain vital for the foreseeable future. Three, as in years past, Russia wields a powerful veto at the UN Security Council, and multilateral cooperation extends to BRICS and the Shanghai Cooperation Organisation. Four, there are deep and abiding concerns in New Delhi about Russia’s post-2014 relationship with China and its exploratory ties with Pakistan. For all these reasons, engaging with Russia at the highest levels is absolutely necessary. Major deals — including last year’s multi-billion dollar deal involving Rosneft and Essar or this year’s negotiations towards the S-400 anti-aircraft missile system — are likely to continue, even if they risk attracting the ire of Europe and the United States.

    But India-Russia ties would also benefit from a dose of realism, a Bulgakovian realisation that no one’s fate is of any interest to you except your own. There is little indication that Putin views India in sentimental terms, unlike an earlier generation of Russian officials exemplified by former Prime Minister Yevgeny Primakov or the late Russian envoy Alexander Kadakin. India’s high-profile and sustained outreach to Moscow in 2018 is not a reversion to an imagined past. It is a hard-nosed attempt at managing a transactional relationship over the medium-term future to secure vital Indian security interests and preserve a favourable balance of power

    https://m.hindustantimes.com/analys...with-russia/story-bHptwdAhJwTeDQ5DKwjwXO.html

     
  7. arya

    arya Senior Member Senior Member

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  8. Kalki_2018

    Kalki_2018 Regular Member

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    I call BS on it. Pakistan which is begging IMF for loans and bail out are simply not in any position to pay the russians in hard cash. China can give them the money but they are not stupid enough to let a their money be spent on Russian weapons.
     
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  9. arya

    arya Senior Member Senior Member

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    Russia can do anything is they fell we are losing them few days back russia made a deal with pakistan navy .
     
  10. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Veteran Member Senior Member

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    :rofl:

    india and paki soldiers will be taking part in the SCO mil. exercise in the near future. That doesnt make India and pakistan , "Friends".
    Also
    That doesnt settle India pak disturbances, but it needed to be seen what normalization will be achieved under the SCO.

    As for now....
    SCO mil. exercises has a larger picture and scheme of things to deal with western hegemony in their multi layered asymmetrical warfare.

    {
    In 2017, SCO's eight full members account for approximately half of the world's population, a quarter of the world's GDP, and about 80% of Eurasia's landmass.
    }

    Of all nations in SCO, including India, Russia is a major arms exporter and Russia would ensure that they try and maintain their defense market with the nations in SCO, also that seems logical for the nations included in the SCO.
    The main theme of SCO is to counterbalance the influence of west and their barbaric village circus out of Asian towns.

    Russia still maintains a large portion of India's defence market and will do so till another few decades. As industries mature in India with high end technology and indigenous components being made in India, Russia will slowly achieve a status of partner in projects than pure seller of arms in India.

    With pakistan, the optics on Russia and the talks in pak media about NEW Russian relationship will keep the inbred population happy and Russia will do what US did in pakistan and sell them Tin, thats the only thing pakis can afford.

    The reality for pakistan is that their economy wont allow them to even have a relationship, let alone weapons :rofl:
    International relationships are very very costly affair and everyone knows pakistan's economy is totaled by china and will never bounce back.


    As for India, it should continue to get the best of what it can from both and all the worlds and take lead positions, talking from the position of strength.
     
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  11. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Veteran Member Senior Member

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    India-Russia trade at a mere 10% of potential (Comment)
    India and Russia have been strong trading partners but the total trade between them in the five years till 2015-16 remained stagnant at $6 billion. In 2016-17, the trade stood at $7.5 billion -- an increase of 22 per cent over the previous year.

    India's exports to Russia have increased from $0.94 billion in 2007-08 to $1.9 billion in 2016-17, while Indian imports from Russia increased from $2.5 billion in 2007-08 to $5.6 billion in 2016-17. Both countries have now set an annual trade target of $30 billion by 2030.

    A Joint Feasibility Group study was set up at the St Petersburg International Business Forum in 2015 to establish a formation of free trade zones between Eurasian Economic Union (EAEU) and India. One of the key recommendations of the report is that total bilateral trade due to a possible FTA has the potential for additional growth up to $37-$62 billion.

    At a time when United States has imposed sanctions against Russia, this also provides an opportunity for India to beef up its trade and economic relationship with Russia. The upcoming visit of Russian President Vladimir Putin in October should be used to further strengthening of ties.

    Since 2014, the United States has imposed travels bans, asset freezes, finance and trade restrictions against individual and companies that restricted financing options for the oil and gas giants through US banks and markets.

    Russia has been a strong and time-tested partner for India. The relationship has been based on several common interests as the two countries also share a similar worldview. They've also had a strong economic relationship in the past. Russia assisted India in taking the initial steps towards industrialisation with major projects like the multipurpose Bhakra Nangal dam, Bhilai steel plant and Indian Institute of Technology-Mumbai.

    When the erstwhile Soviet Union collapsed in 1991, Russia was India's biggest supplier of defence technology. Merchandise trade between the countries was initially mainly textiles, tea and wheat but later expanded to a wide range from food to hydrocarbons to information technology.

    Pharmaceutical products are one of the top items that India exports to Russia. Tea, coffee, spices and apparel are some of the items are also exported. Top imports from Russia include gems and jewellery, petroleum products and fertilisers.

    The opportunities are immense for these two countries to enhance economic ties beyond trade. It is civil nuclear energy and defence cooperation that will dominate the relationship between the two countries.

    There is a huge potential for Russia to invest in defence manufacturing, as the country is the primary source for defence equipment in India. Though US sanctions are irritant for India, it has made it clear that its defence purchases will not be dictated by any other country, such as the United States. In April, Defence Minister Nirmala Sitharaman met her Russian counterpart, General Sergey Shoygu, in Moscow and discussed how to enhance defence production cooperation and create synergies in the sector.

    The energy sector also offers enormous potential with India an energy deficient country and Russia an energy surplus. With India expected to emerge as the third largest consumer of energy by 2025, after United States and China, Russia can play a vital role in providing energy security in the future.

    Russia can invest in India's infrastructure development programme like the Delhi-Mumbai Industrial Corridor (DMIC), Smart Cities, low-cost housing and urban transport systems. The DMIC envisages investments of $90 billion while the Smart City initiative is projected to involve total spending of $690 billion.

    For India, Russia can be potential market for Information Technology and related services, given that these are India's largest export services.

    With India emerging as a leading manufacturer of low-cost, high quality generic drugs, Indian companies can partner with Russian firms for joint ventures under the Pharma 2020 programme of Russian government which aims to develop a production base.

    A weak Russian economy is becoming increasingly dependent on China for economic cooperation and India's concern could be that the dependency could further extend to political and strategic issues.

    In the Sochi summit the two leaders also upgraded the relationship to a "special privileged strategic partnership" and Prime Minister Narendra Modi had expressed hope that this special relationship will be further strengthened. During the 18th economic summit in St Petersburg, Modi said: "The ties between India and Russia span the spectrum from culture to defence."

    The October summit, in which the leaders plan to discuss a wide range of issues of bilateral relations, especially trade and economic ties, presents an opportunity for India to further cement the relationship with it's time-tested partner.

    (Manish Kumar is Deputy Director, International (Eurasia and Israel) at Confederation of Indian Industries-CII. The views expressed are personal. He can be reached at [email protected] <mailto:[email protected]>)

    --IANS

    manish/vm/hs

    https://www.business-standard.com/a...e-10-of-potential-comment-118091400224_1.html
     
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  12. Kshatriya87

    Kshatriya87 Senior Member Senior Member

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    Eight pacts signed after Modi-Putin summit

    HIGHLIGHTS



    *Protocol for consultations between two foreign ministries

    *MoU of economic development between ministry of Russia & Niti Ayog

    *MoU between ISRO and federal space agency of Russia on human space flight missions

    *MoU of cooperation between Indian and Russian railways

    *Action plan for prioritisation and implementation of cooperation in nuclear field

    *MoU between Russian ministry of transport and Indian railways on transport education

    *MoU on micro small and medium business

    *Agreement on cooperation in fertiliser sector

    *President Putin and PM Modi have adopted a joint statement Russia-India enduring partnership in a changing world

    *Putin said, “We discussed our trade cooperation. We have such a goal of increasing goods turnover by 30 billion USD by 2025. Have invited PM Modi as chief guest at the Economic Forum in September 2019. Deepening energy sector is what we have paid a lot of attention to.”



    *Putin said, “Our cooperation goes beyond supplies of Russian weapons. We produce military weapons together. In August, an Indian unit participated for the first time in anti-terror activities in Russia.”

    *Neither Modi nor President Putin mentioned #S400 in their statements. There was speculation that Putin and Modi would take one question each after their press statements. But no questions were entertained by both the leaders.



    *S400 inked, confirmed in joint statement.
     
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  13. mayfair

    mayfair Elite Member Elite Member

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    Not sure how significant the MoUs are unless there's a follow up. Signed agreements are more important in the present juncture.
     
  14. Kshatriya87

    Kshatriya87 Senior Member Senior Member

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    MOUs form the foundation for agreements .
     
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  15. su30mki2017

    su30mki2017 Regular Member

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    Last edited: Dec 26, 2018
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  16. Jameson Emoni

    Jameson Emoni Regular Member

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    I have noticed that RT tends to spend a lot of time praising China and badmouthing India. I get the feeling that defeat of Hillary Clinton may have been bad for India as anti-India as she was.
     
  17. Vishwarupa

    Vishwarupa Senior Member Senior Member

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  18. Indx TechStyle

    Indx TechStyle War Mongerer Veteran Member Senior Member

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