Indian Navy Developments & Discussions

Discussion in 'Indian Navy' started by .v0id, Feb 12, 2009.

  1. A.V.

    A.V. New Member

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    Coast Guard planning to procure used choppers for coastal surveillance

    New Delhi, Feb 22: Faced with shortage of helicopters for carrying out surveillance in coastal areas, the Coast Guard is planning to procure used aircraft to plug gaps in its capabilities.

    "Government has recently cleared a proposal for procurement of around 30 helicopters for us on an urgent basis and with helicopters not being available off-the shelf, we are looking for inducting used ones also," Defence Ministry sources said.

    Soon after the Mumbai attacks, the Cabinet Committee on Security cleared various proposals for acquiring, hiring and leasing naval and aerial assets for the ICG.

    The agency is looking to induct helicopters of five-tonne class for carrying out surveillance and is in talks with various global manufacturers in this regard.

    "We have been approached by ICG and they told us that they wanted these helicopters urgently. We did a check on our helicopters flying in India and identified that we would be able to give the agency four of them currently flying here," European helicopter-manufacturer Eurocopter's senior vice president Norbert Ducrot said.

    Eurocopter's machines flying in India are of Dauphin-class, which fall in the medium weight category of helicopters as sought by the CG. "We are enquiring with other manufacturers also if they can spare their helicopters for our needs," a Defence Ministry source said.

    Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL) built Advanced Light Helicopter (ALH) Dhruv also falls in the same weight-class.

    "After meeting the present requirements of the CG, more orders for the indigenous helicopter can be placed for future requirements," the source said.

    At present, the Coast Guard has a fleet of 17 Chetaks, 24 Dornier-228, and four ALHs and is also in the process of procuring and inducting six Multi-Mission Maritime Aircraft (MMMA), which would augment the existing fleet of Dornier-228 aircraft in the near future, as envisaged in its Perspective Plan.

    The agency's aviation arm undertakes coordinated operations in support of its surface assets towards protection of the vast Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ), extends assistance to fishermen and mariners in distress, preserves and protect marine environment and assists local authorities during natural calamities.


    http://www.zeenews.com/nation/2009-02-22/509728news.html
     
  2. pyromaniac

    pyromaniac Founding Member

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    Swedish Firm Consilium AB Wins Indian Navy Navigation Equipment Order Worth USD 46000

    Consilium has received an order to deliver navigation equipment for three destroyers being built at the Mazagon yard in Mumbai for the Indian Navy. The order value is more than 4 MSEK. The order consists of navigation equipment for the naval vessels in India's new destroyer program (Project 15 Alpha – Kolkata), based on the Consilium Selux radar.

    The destroyers will be fitted with numerous top modern technical solutions, and will with a cruising speed of more than 30 knots also be used for protection of the Indian coast from piracy and drug trafficking. Consilium will deliver the equipment during the 2009-2011 period. "We are experiencing a good demand for our navigational solutions from coast guarding agencies and naval units and this order verifies our strong radar offering. The order is also a result of successful deliveries previously made to the Indian Navy.", said Ove Hansson, Consilium's President and CEO.

    Consilium is one of the world's leading suppliers of safety and navigation products and solutions. The product portfolio comprises systems for fire protection, gas and emission detection, automation systems and navigational equipment, among other things. Systems and products are mainly marketed towards shipyards and ship owners, together with the oil and gas industry.

    The guiding-star of Consilium's total offerings is to contribute in the protection of lives, material assets and the environment. Consilium's goal is to be the customer's first choice when safety matters and to offer superior customer value. The ambition is to become a global leader within well defined market and product areas, by utilization of the Group's combined competence, long experience and successful innovations – and thereby create long-lasting shareholder value. Consilium is publicly listed on the OMX Nordic Exchange, has more than 450 employees and a turnover exceeding 900 MSEK.


    http://www.india-defence.com/reports-4236
     
  3. A.V.

    A.V. New Member

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    Sikorsky Bids Twice for Indian Navy Helo

    BANGALORE - Sikorsky is leaving nothing to chance in the bid for the Indian Navy's $1 billion Multi-Role Helicopter (MRH) program.

    "We put in two bids," said Scott Pierce, Sikorsky vice president, Worldwide Sales – Asia, to meet the requirement for 16 helicopters to replace aging Sea King multi-role helicopters.

    Sikorsky is offering the S-70B Seahawk as a commercial direct sale and the MH-60R as a Foreign Military Sale (FMS) under the U.S. Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA). "The MH-60R comes with U.S. government interaction," said Pierce.

    Sikorsky feared new problems encountered over the end-user agreement now hanging up the Boeing P-8I deal would not be resolved quickly enough to successfully compete for the tender with just one platform.

    The U.S. and India have been arguing over the end-user monitoring agreement, which dictates what types of U.S. arms can be sold to India. New Delhi and Washington are now in negotiations over settling the matter, said Indian Defence Minister A.K. Antony.

    AJS Walia, Sikorsky managing director, India and South Asia, said the "end-user certification is being addressed in India and in the U.S. and are dealing with the issue."

    "Many companies are watching the P-8 deal to see how that is resolved," said Pierce.

    Despite apprehension, Sikorsky is pushing forward into the Indian civil and military market. "India is one of the fastest markets in the world for helicopters," said Pierce.

    There have also been problems for U.S. helicopter manufacturers over bids for India's tender for 22 attack helicopters. Bell and Boeing bowed out after India enforced a direct commercial sale. The Bell AH-1 Cobra and Boeing AH-64 Apache come under the control of the DSCA and are required to go through a lengthy FMS review process before release. Sikorsky's Pierce said they are still interested in bidding and are considering the armed Blackhawk as an option.

    In 2008, Sikorsky sold the S-76 commercial helicopter to four customers in India and is partnering with an unidentified Indian company to build S-92 airframes.

    "We are a couple of months away from making an announcement," said Walia. Sources suggest the company is Tatas.

    Sikorsky also plans to create a customer service center for the S-76 and is now doing site surveys, said Pierce.

    X2 Tech Sikorsky was also detailing its experimental X2 Technology Demonstrator to Aero India visitors.

    Ashish Bagai, Sikorsky senior aerodynamicist, was like a proud father describing the aircraft that flies both like a helicopter and a prop-driven fixed wing aircraft.

    "We jacked up the speed to 250 knots per hour," said Bagai.

    Equipped with an auxiliary propeller in the rear, the aircraft has a radius of 110 nautical miles with a range of five hours making it very attractive to the military market.

    The aircraft is clearly unique.

    "It bridges the gap of high speed performance of a fixed wing aircraft and hover capability of a helicopter," he said. "It is based on a rigid coaxial system, not articulated."

    "The first flight was last August, followed on by two additional flights last year," said Bagai. "We went up to 27 knots during the test. During the first three tests the auxiliary propeller was disconnected."

    The aircraft is now being prepared for a test using its auxiliary propeller scheduled for late 2009.

    Bagai said the new aircraft would have both military and commercial applications. This includes an attack, light tactical, utility, search-and-rescue, unmanned and passenger variant.

    Besides what a normal helicopter is capable of, the X2 will have no in-flight transition, level body acceleration and deceleration, and improved range.

    "It gives us something in hover and speed. Something most conventional helicopters can't do," he said.

    It will have a take-off weight capacity of 12,000-16,000 pounds for the utility version.

    However, the future the aircraft is uncertain. Despite its unique speed and maneuverability, the aircraft could end up in the museum.

    "Once we hit 250 knots this year we'll make a decision on where to go with it. What the customer requirements will be will determine what direction we will go with the platform," Bagai said. "The helicopter pushes the envelope on helicopter speed and efficiency. It will be cheaper to operate than helicopters."


    http://www.defensenews.com/osd_story.php?sh=VSDI&i=3947010
     
  4. jayadev

    jayadev Founding Member

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    Chinese checkers in the Indian Ocean

    ‘JOSTLING for place in IOR’, ‘Chinese foot prints in the IOR’, ‘String of pearls strategy’ are some of the terms that strategists and analysts have routinely used when it comes to describing the Chinese maritime overture in our neighbourhood. The episode of ‘close encounters of the Chinese kind’ enacted in the Gulf of Aden, though orchestrated at a tactical level has many strategic overtones. The case in point is the recent reported stand off between two destroyers Haikou (DDG 171), and Wuhan (DDG 169) of the PLA Navy in the Gulf of Aden (part of an anti-piracy force) and an Indian submarine. The Chinese media claimed that the Indian submarine was forced to surface after an hour-long ‘hide and seek’ game. On the part of the Indian Navy, they have officially denied the incident.
    Irrespective of the authenticity of the report, at the tactical level it is common for navies around the world to deploy their aircraft, submarines, shore intelligence gathering stations and even research vessels for stalking targets of opportunity from other navies.
    In peace time warships on transit get wide publicity, particularly when they are deployed in ‘out-of-area’ operations and at times invariably invite the attention of the litoral/regional navies.
    Such missions are aimed at collecting distinct electronic signatures obtained by emissions of various sensors.
    Every equipment that radiates from any platform has a distinct fingerprint.
    Such data can be stored in electronic libraries for future use and correlate in an event of hostilities. With the advent of beyond visual range (BVR) smart weapons, the process of positive identification of target is always a daunting one and such libraries facilitates engagement at extended weapon ranges.
    Even the communication that emanates from the equipment on ships leaves an electronic imprint.
    If the Indian submarine was in the area either by accident or design, it would immediately start looking for underwater signatures from the sonar, the propellers, pumps and other machinery of the Chinese ships in the area. (As it was in the submarine-tosubmarine hunting sequences in The hunt for the Red October). It would have been considered unprofessional, if they had let go of this opportunity.
    The Chinese subs would have done likewise on encountering any warship as a standard practice. If the Indian submarine did surface there is every possibility that it had done its job by that time. However, in the process the submarine’s identity and its signature would have been compromised.
    Some reports say that it was not an Indian submarine. It could well be the Iranian Kilo class submarine that is of the same class as the Indian sub with similar characteristics. The truth is only two players know the identity at the time of playing this game of Chinese checkers.
    The Chinese ships were deployed ostensibly to prevent their ships from being hijacked by Somalian pirates. The present action by the PLA Navy was similar to the actions initiated by many nations to counter the upsurge in piracy attacks off the Somalian coast. As the ransom paid to pirates increased, they got emboldened to venture out to deeper seas to carry out attacks on larger ships. The case of MV Faina carrying tanks and other war materials is all too familiar. The ship and the crew were released after five months for a ransom of $3,200,000. Given these circumstances, there can be no complaints about the response from the PLA Navy.
    The Indian government after pressure from the families of those held on MV Stalt Valor, deployed INS Tabar in the area to protect its commercial interests and Indian crew. The assertive actions of Tabar in destroying a trawler belonging to the pirates came in for lot of praise by the maritime community around the world. The role of the Indian Navy and the publicity given to its proactive action would not have escaped attention by the Chinese Navy and the leadership. While the action of other navies of the world and the Indian Navy may have prompted the Chinese Navy to accelerate the deployment of its own units, Chinese intentions are manifold.
    Firstly it is the obvious compulsion to protect their own merchant ships, which were vulnerable to pirates.
    More than 80 per cent of China’s energy needs are met from imports. Its economic growth is inextricably linked to the unhindered supply of energy goods and on the safe movement of cargo to and from its ports.
    Secondly, this deployment presented an opportunity for the Chinese to evaluate the staying capability of their assets for extended deployments in far-flung areas. The issues of passage analysis, logistic support, rules of engagement, familiarity with the areas of operation, collection of bathymetric and oceanic data would help the PLA-N in fine-tuning future operations.
    Thirdly, it is aimed at achieving strategic objectives and to signal to international players that they are now ready to foray in to areas that hitherto remained the exclusive prerogative of the US and its allies. This could also be the beginning of a new phase of operations in the Indian Ocean to challenge the regional maritime supremacy of India. The littoral nations would be observing which way the competition between the two Asian giants is headed? The ‘string of pearls strategy’ was meant to create spheres of influence in littoral countries to provide leverages in the IOR to counter the developing influence of India. Consistent with the long-term plans of PLA-Navy, it is clear that the Chinese have now enlarged the scope of their activity in the Indian Ocean Region to include ‘power projection’ and ‘force deployment’. China has served notice to the rest of the world that it now has a blue water navy determined to protect its interests in any part of the world.
    http://www.expressbuzz.com/edition/...AN,+NAVY,+GULF,+EDEN&SectionName=m3GntEw72ik=
     
  5. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    Chinese still have not fought a war far from home this will prove their status.
     
  6. Triton

    Triton Founding Member

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    Navy to head Indian maritime security: Antony

     
  7. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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    http://www.hindu.com/2009/03/01/stories/2009030154781000.htm

    Navy to order 60 more indigenous warships

    S. Anandan

    32 ships, six submarines under indigenous order: Navy chief

    Maritime domain will be highly relevant in sustaining growth

    Multiple roles of warship make task exceedingly challenging

     
  8. .v0id

    .v0id FOUNDER Administrator

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    Navy to order 60 more indigenous warships S. Anand

    Navy to order 60 more indigenous warships

    S. Anandan

    32 ships, six submarines under indigenous order: Navy chief

    Maritime domain will be highly relevant in sustaining growth

    Multiple roles of warship make task exceedingly challenging

    Kochi: The Navy will place orders for indigenous construction of 60 more platforms, including frigates, destroyers, landing platform dock, another aircraft carrier and several other ships over the next 10 to 12 years, Admiral Sureesh Mehta, Chief of the Naval Staff, has said.

    These platforms would be inducted in service from the middle of the next decade, over a period of another 10 years or so, said the Admiral in his address at the keel-laying ceremony of the indigenous aircraft carrier (IAC) at the Cochin Shipyard on Saturday. Earlier, he termed the keel-laying as marking “another milestone in our quest for supremacy at sea in the waters of our interest.”
    Capital intensive

    “Warship building is a highly technical and capital intensive activity. It takes several years of dedicated efforts of highly skilled warship designers, shipyard personnel and numerous ancillary industries. The multiple and varied roles that a warship has to perform make the task of the designer exceedingly demanding and challenging,” he said outlining the country’s humble foray into warship building that fashioned the British design-based INS Nilgiri in the 1970s and the fully indigenous Godavari class frigate in the mid-1980s.

    “Currently 32 ships and six submarines are under indigenous order in our shipyards,” he said.In an oblique reference to the 26/11 Mumbai terror attacks, the Admiral said: “The emerging maritime security environment has greatly enhanced the responsibilities of the Navy… Further, economic and geopolitical developments worldwide and in our immediate neighbourhood have re-emphasised the need for a strong and self-reliant Navy. In the foreseeable future, the maritime domain will become increasingly relevant in sustaining our growth and enhanced maritime activity will require a corresponding increase in maritime security forces.”
    Long-term needs

    The Admiral said the warship building programme was tailored to cater for long-term capability development whose spin-offs would include development of indigenous technological base and jobs for many, either directly or through ancillary industries. Presenting two models of ship building for increasing productivity and quality, the Admiral said cooperative approaches with leading ship building and design firms worldwide for simultaneous production of ships of the same class at different locations in India could be tried out.

    “Yet another could encompass offloading specific functions like outfitting or system integration to external agencies with core expertise, whilst basic construction remains with the parent yard,” he said.
     
  9. Atul

    Atul Founding Member

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    Thats a Welcome New's, as i did comment earlier, If INDIA has to dominate the Indian Ocean, Arabian Sea & Bay of Bengal Navy will play a very crutial role in determining the same.

    This decision is just great.:vehicle_plane:
     
  10. s_bman

    s_bman Regular Member

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    Indian navy to be responsible for Indian costal security
    Written on February 28, 2009 – 4:48 pm | by Frontier India Strategic and Defence |

    The out going government today announced a slew of measures to strengthen maritime and coastal security against threats from the sea. In the backdrop of multiple agencies involved in coastal security and the resultant problems of coordination, the government has designated the Indian Navy as the authority responsible for overall maritime security, both coastal and offshore. The Indian Navy will be assisted by Coast Guard, State Marine Police and other Central and State agencies for the coastal defence of the nation.

    Announcing this at a press conference shortly after laying the keel of the country’s first indigenous aircraft carrier in Kochi today, the Defence Minister AK Antony said ‘the tragic incidents that took place at Mumbai has in fact shaken the nation. It is our duty to learn from that tragic incident.’

    He said Joint Operation Centres (JOCs) at Mumbai, Visakhapatnam, Kochi and Port Blair will be set up under the charge of existing Naval C-in-Cs. The JOCs will be jointly manned and operated by the Navy and Coast Guard with inputs from diverse agencies including Coast Guard, Navy and concerned Central and State Government agencies. The Naval C-in-Cs will be designated as the C-in-Cs Coastal Defence.

    Antony said a National Command, Control, Communication and Intelligence network for real-time maritime domain awareness linking the operations rooms of the Navy and Coast Guard, both at the field and the apex levels, will also be established.

    The Defence Minister said the Navy will control all Navy and Coast Guard joint operations. “This will ensure that the assets are optimally deployed and there is synergy between the two organisations. With these measures the Government is expecting that a new focus will be given for effectively managing threats from the sea and security for our coastline”, he said.

    Antony said the government has also taken a number of steps for strengthening the maritime security agencies like Navy and Coast Guard by increasing their assets like ships, boats, helicopters, aircraft etc. as well as manpower. The Navy is getting a new specialised force called “Sagar Prahari Bal” comprising 1000 personnel for protecting naval assets and bases on both East and West coasts and the Island territories. Along with this, 80 Fast Interception Crafts will be procured for sea front patrolling by this force. A new Regional HQ will be set up in Gujarat under the newly created post of COMCG, North-West, to look after surveillance off the coast of Gujarat.

    The Defence Minister said offshore security is also an important component of maritime security. In this direction, the government has decided for installation of Vessel and Air Traffic Management System for all offshore development areas as has been done in the Western offshore region by Ministry of Petroleum. Along with this, Government has decided to procure Immediate Support Vessels for offshore security by Ministry of Petroleum and Indian Navy. In the interim, patrolling using hired craft will be done.

    Antony said the Indian Coast Guard will be additionally designated as the authority responsible for coastal security in territorial waters including areas to be patrolled by the Coastal Police. The Director General Coast Guard will be designated as Commander Coastal Command and will be responsible for overall coordination between central and state agencies in all matters relating to coastal security. The Defence Minister said the government has approved setting up of nine additional Coast Guard stations to integrate into the ‘hub-and-spoke concept’ with coastal police stations along with manpower. These stations are to be located at Karwar, Ratnagiri, Vadinar, Gopalpur, Minicoy, Androth, Karaikal, Hutbay and Nizampatnam. The Coastguard is being empowered both in terms of providing assets like ships, boats, aircraft and helicopters and necessary manpower for their enhanced role in guarding our coast line. One post of Addl DG, one post of COM North West, three posts of DDG have been sanctioned in addition to about 20% increase in afloat units and 30% increase for shore support. The Intelligence set up of Coast Guard is also being improved with adequate manpower resources. Government has also approved the proposal for setting up of Static Coastal Radar Chain and a comprehensive network chain of AIS stations along the entire coast as well as island territories. This will be implemented by Ministry of Shipping, Road Transport and Highways in coordination with Coast Guard. Further, AIS Transponders on vessels below 300 tonnes are also proposed to be installed. This work will be done by Ministry of Shipping in coordination with Coast Guard.
     
  11. Singh

    Singh Phat Cat Administrator

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    Navy Chief says nukes can be smuggled into India via sea route

    New Delhi, Feb 18 (ANI): Chief of Naval Staff, Admiral Sureesh Mehta, on Wednesday warned that nuclear weapons could be smuggled into the country in cargo containers via the sea route.
    Addressing a conference on port sector development and security in New Delhi on Wednesday, Admiral Mehta said; “Today about 70 to 75 percent of global cargo is containerized. It has been acknowledged widely that cargo containers are the most likely means for a terrorist organisation to illegally transport a nuclear weapon.”
    Mehta’’s warning comes in the wake of the 26/11 attacks on Mumbai, carried out by terrorists entering the city via sea from Karachi.
    Admiral Mehta told reporters after the conference that measures like a port examination through X-ray machines are mandatory to ensure security.
    Elaborating on port security, Admiral Mehta advised every country to use the high-tech Container Inspection System (CIS) for all traffic moving on sea routes around the world.
    “The fact is that if it (CIS) is applicable only to the traffic that is moving into the United States then it’’s not the complete full proof system. Every country has to accede to it (so) that wherever whichever port the container leads from that country certifies that this container is fully secure, so that at the other end also it arrives secure, and if everybody does that then the whole world is secure,” added Admiral Mehta.
    The CIS uses digital radiography technology for rapid inspection of containers of different sizes as an effective measure for customs to combat smuggling and customs revenue evasion.
    India has already boosted its coastal security with both the Indian Navy and Coast Guard carrying out coordination patrols.
    The warning comes in the backdrop of reports of the Taliban’’s threat to attack Western cultural centres in Indian cities. The reports say that no intelligence input is available on the nature, specific target, the timing or group likely to carry out the threat. (ANI)

    http://www.thaindian.com/newsportal...ggled-into-india-via-sea-route_100156685.html
     
  12. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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    http://www.expressbuzz.com/edition/...avy,+micro-submarine&SectionName=pWehHe7IsSU=

    Navy eyeing micro-submarine


    Manoj K Das
    First Published : 02 Mar 2009 01:59:00 AM IST
    Last Updated : 02 Mar 2009 08:20:09 AM IST

    KOCHI: In an effort to strengthen its underwater attack capabilities the Indian Navy is in talks with the Naval Science and Technical Laboratory, Visakhapatnam, to build a micro-submarine for its strategic operations.

    The NSTL scientists have put the preliminary design of a vessel on their drawing board. Sources told Express that the micro-submarine will have a carrying capacity of six persons. It will have the endurance of a normal submarine.

    “All major navies have a fleet of small submarines. They are used for reconnaissance and intelligence gathering. The same boats are also used for special operations like closeto- shore commando strikes,” sources said.

    The Indian Navy has asked NSTL scientists to come up with a model similar to the ones used by advanced forces. “A manned microsubmarine has gained strategic relevance in this era of surgical strikes. It won’t leave loud signatures that can be heard by enemy sonar or other monitoring mechanisms,” sources said.

    The project will be a totally indigenous effort. The Defence Ministry wants this to be showcased as a public-private initiative. “We will rope in builders or firms that will play a role in fabricating its parts from the beginning. There are a few names like L&T and Tata who have evinced interest in playing a bigger role in the defence industry,” sources said.

    The NSTL is expected to finish the design by 2010. The hope is to carry out the first trials by 2015. In another development, the Navy successfully carried out two live trials of super torpedo Varunastra. This torpedo weighs twice as much as the conventional one and has a longer range.

    “The two test firings were on target. Varunastra can accurately kill a big ship anywhere in a radius of 10 km. This being a big weapon, one torpedo can effectively take out a potential threat,” sources said adding that the Navy has asked for 100 weapons which will be delivered by the year end.


    Top
     
  13. pyromaniac

    pyromaniac Founding Member

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    This is like the midget submarine the British used during world war 2..America even considered building them after the cold war but they found that the sea wolf and the Virginia class subs performed flawlessly at this task. Wouldn't the IN be better off just building a remote guided boat to do this?
     
  14. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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    http://www.hindu.com/2009/03/02/stories/2009030255611400.htm

    Seabed array system prototype tested

    S. Anandan

    Kochi: Just when coastal India broods over measures to counter seaborne threats, the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) is in the process of developing an integrated costal defence system under its Project Nayan.

    “The development of seabed array system, forming its pivot, is making steadfast progress and we have tested the prototype successfully,” a top source told The Hindu.

    “The idea is to get alerted when objects traverse the waters. The echo emanating from various objects like fish, various types of ships, submarines and the like have been calibrated and identified for the purpose. Now that the prototype is ready, we need to test it as a system with multiple layers and at various depths,” said the source.

    Water medium

    The array would transmit the ricocheted signal to the top water medium, maybe a sonobuoy, which in turn would be transmitted to the shore-based command and control centre by way of an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) or a satellite.

    “Once the capability is unambiguously demonstrated, it will be installed initially at Karwar under Project Seabird. However, for the entire system to come into being, we require an exclusive ocean satellite. That, however, has not come so far,” said the source

    Another project

    In progress, however, is another ambitious programme that will augment the DRDO’s underwater detection capabilities. Oceanic waves are photographed, in multiple pixels, using a remote sensing satellite.

    As in the seabed array system, various types of waves created by movement of different objects are standardised and using signal processing, the cause of a definite kind of wave is recognised.

    Encouraging

    “In its nascent stage, initial trials pertaining to wave-identification have been highly encouraging. At present, we are developing the method of signal processing but we need to demonstrate it at the system level and in real-time to call it a full-fledged programme,” the source said.
     
  15. pyromaniac

    pyromaniac Founding Member

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    Nuclear you say..damn!! Imagine the possibilities if they actually manage to pull this off. Does anyone have a time line/expected date for this?
     
  16. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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    What is so great about it now? When ATV is ready to hit the water. The miniaturization of reactor is already complete and about to be tested. So Aircraft carrier with nuclear power should not be that much of an issue. But good they are going with step by step process first design a 40000 ton carrier then go for larger ones.
     
  17. pyromaniac

    pyromaniac Founding Member

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    Simple....a conventional aircraft carrier is constrained..severely because it needs to refuel albeit not frequently but it still needs to stop to refuel. A nuclear powered one doesn't have to except to bring on board rations and aviation fuel..and I wont even talk about how long its legs will be.

    A N-powered AC will be a real power projector..being able to travel anywhere in the world!!!
     
  18. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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    Right now IN does not need a global reach first get the IOR region covered then we can look for global reach.
     
  19. pyromaniac

    pyromaniac Founding Member

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    But we are talking about the future...such an AC will probably get 10-15 years to get finalized and built..by then we will be looking at a different India. Moreover, Indian navy has said that it wants a global reach and wants to be a blue water navy by 2020+...what better way
     
  20. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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    There is step by step process for everything. When IN has asked for a conventional carrier they must have thought about it. Yes they will be looking for a greater role outside IOR region but it will take some time. And these conventional carriers will be used in IOR region. And is it impossible for them to operate outside IOR?

    Nuclear powered carriers will be there but I think they will have some new tech also like CATOBAR not STOBAR what we use as of now.
     

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