Do we deserve Jana Gana Mana as our National Anthem???

Discussion in 'Politics & Society' started by Bhushan, Apr 28, 2009.

  1. Tolaha

    Tolaha Senior Member Senior Member

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    Once the great man himself has said that "Jana Gana Mana" has been sung in praise of India... who are we to derive any other meanings from the anthem?

     
  2. Abir

    Abir Regular Member

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    There is another song in Hindi which was sung praising Georgie the fifth on that very ceremony. So less people seem to know that.

    And yeah it's kind of insulting when Tagore himself took the effort to state the obvious, which he normally wouldn't do for such conspiracies.
     
  3. Abir

    Abir Regular Member

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    Badshah Humara by Rambhuj Chaudhary, that's the song which was sung in that occasion to praise the monarch.
     
  4. S.A.T.A

    S.A.T.A Senior Member Senior Member

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    But the fact that Jana Gana Mana was adopted as the national anthem makes its case more significant.
     
  5. Abir

    Abir Regular Member

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    I should have said, Badshah Humara by Rambhuj Chaudhary, that's the song and the only song which was sung in that occasion to praise the monarch.

    The whole convention wasn't intended for praising the monarch.
     
  6. Abir

    Abir Regular Member

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    This is the official report of the ceremony by Indian National Congress.

    That's by Amrita Bazar Patrika Dec.28,1911

    The Bengalee, Dec. 28, 1911

    However the anglo-Indian press Statesman and Englishman goofed up.
     
  7. S.A.T.A

    S.A.T.A Senior Member Senior Member

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    An excerpt from the article from countercurrents that was posted by yusuf

     
  8. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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    There is no ambiguity as per Tagore's interpretation. The entire lyrics of the song is out there for everyone to see.

    The Congress never perceived it as an eulogy to the British Monarch. Are we still so naïve to believe that none of the members of INC understood the meaning of the entire lyrics of the song? It was typical in those times to write songs where the real meaning was hidden and intended for the Indian audience. INC understood this. They were all too happy with the British press mis-interpreting as an eulogy to the British Emperor. The idea was to pass the message of a change in status quo by some kind of a revolution for the motherland while the British press was all too happy interpreting it in a way that made them happy.

    The Emperor of the British Empire has nothing do with these statements. See the quotes (below) directly from the song.
    ^^ Why on earth would people blow conch shells in honour of the British Emperor in the middle of a revolution?

    ^^ How could Tagore refer to the Emperor, who was male as 'माता'? It was a reference to India as the Motherland.

    S.A.T.A. my friend, once again you are coming up with your own interpretations which are 'clear' [sic.] to you. There is nothing 'clear' [sic.] about this song being an eulogy to the British Empire or Emperor, nor is anything 'clear' [sic.] about INC interpreting it as an eulogy to the British Emperor. The British Emperor was never a charioteer (in fact he was used to being chauffeured around by his charioteer), and of course never an eternal one.

    There is more to debunk this 'theory' that perhaps it was an eulogy to the British Emperor. See below:

    ^^ Hmm, why would the Sun rise from the East on the horizons of the Himalayas when London was clearly to the West of India (assuming the song was an eulogy to the Emperor)?

    ^^ The call for the elixir of new life obviously implies a change in status quo. The status quo then was that India was part of the British Empire. A change in that status, in the way of a revolution (दारुण विप्लव-माझे), was what Tagore hoped for.

    ^^ It is this true leader of India (भारत-भाग्य-विधाता), under whose kind disposition, will the sleeping mass of Indians rise up or wake up and start a revolution.

    Any claims as to the INC interpreting this song as an eulogy to the British Emperor is more of a rhetoric than fact. Once again, this song was written in Bengali with plenty of shared vocabulary with Sanskrit, Hindi and other Indian languages. If the complete song is read, the meanings are clear, and I have no doubt that most of INC understood what this song meant.

    More disambiguation is out there in post #18 to 'clear' any doubts that anyone might have regarding INC's interpretation of this song.
     
    hit&run likes this.
  9. Abir

    Abir Regular Member

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    It seems official statement is of no value in comparison to apparent facts as told by chain mails.
     
  10. S.A.T.A

    S.A.T.A Senior Member Senior Member

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    @Maitra

    My interpretation of Congress' interpretation is on the basis of Sri Tagore's own confession to Yeats that he was asked by congress to write a eulogy to welcome the British Monarch and he wrote an sent it to them and that it was sung at the welcoming ceremony.Surely Sri Tagore interpreted his words differently,for Congress it was what they had requested,the song that welcomed the English Monarch to indian soil....the controversy regarding INC's interpretation is not entirely farfetched ,even if the entire matter is quite irrelevant at the moment.
     
  11. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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    ^^ the official statement definitely has value. The official statement states that the ceremony was to welcome King and Emperor George V. It also states that this song was sung on that occasion. The official statement ends there. The further interpretations that this particular song was in praise to King and Emperor George is a manifestation of gullibility.
     
  12. Abir

    Abir Regular Member

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    Would you please give a citation for this, if that is not too much an effort?
     
  13. Abir

    Abir Regular Member

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    The official statements say -

    The day was started by a patriotic song by Tagore(as far as I know patriotic means devotion to the country, not to the monarch who colonized your country).

    Another song(Badshah Humara by Rambhuj Chaudhary) which specifically was composed for king and queen was sung at some later period of the day.

     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2011
  14. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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    We know the lyrics of the song and we know what it means. So no controversy on that.

    Regarding INC, whatever they did, I am pretty sure they understood the real meaning of the song, and decided to present it on the face of King and Emperor George V. That in itself was patriotic enough.

    It was and still is a common practice in Bengali and Bhojpuri (and probably other languages) to write songs with double meaning.

    For example, there is one song (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5vB47peHpUY) that apparently talks about cricket. That interpretation is meant for the gullible. The real interpretation is about a newly married girl's first sexual experience.
     
  15. S.A.T.A

    S.A.T.A Senior Member Senior Member

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  16. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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    Ok, now I see what you meant. Sorry for misunderstanding your post. Thanks for the clarification.
     
  17. Abir

    Abir Regular Member

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    As I told earlier, there was only one song which was composed to praise the monarch.
     
  18. Abir

    Abir Regular Member

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    Thanks for getting my name right! :D


    Yeats died before Tagore.

    This letter was written by Tagore some 2 years before Yeats died.

    Yeats recollection don't seem to hold much value. I doubt any such recollection has ever happened. The blog by some Chatterjee is trash.
     
  19. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    I think one should ponder on PMaitra's comments.

    Kazi Nazrul Islam composed the song - More Ghumoghore Aley Monohar - in praise of the Hindu God. It was sung by Feroza Begum.

    Here it is danced by a Bangladeshi girl, Olive Islam!





    Therefore, one could presume, if one goes to the extreme end of the spectrum, that it is blasphemous and should be banned! That sort of an idea would not be far fetched I think.

    One has to admit that it is fashionable to trash everything sacred by raising controveries!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 10, 2015
  20. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    hear the devotional song I have appended and enjoy the dance by Olive.

    The song is one of my favourites.
     

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