Disbanded or Transferred Regiments of the British Indian Army

Discussion in 'Military History' started by F-14B, Mar 4, 2017.

  1. F-14B

    F-14B #iamPUROHIT Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2016
    Messages:
    2,075
    Likes Received:
    3,941
    Location:
    Most ancient Kingdom of cochin
    The Bikaner Camel Corps was a unit of Imperial Service Troops from India that fought for the Allies in World War I and World War II.

    The Corps was founded by Maharaja Ganga Singh of the Indian state of Bikaner, as the Ganga Risala after the British government of India accepted his offer to raise a force of 500 soldiers. The state of Bikaner had a long tradition of using soldiers mounted on camels. For instance, in 1465 Rao Bika led a force of 300 sowar (or camel riders) to conquer neighbouring territories.[1] Ganga Singh led the Ganga Risala when it fought in the Boxer Rebellion in China in 1900, in Somaliland in 1902-1904 to quell the Somali Uprising and in Egypt in World War I. At the Suez Canal in 1915 the corps routed the opposing Turkish forces in a camel cavalry charge.[2] The Corps fought in the Middle East in World War II, when it was supported by the camel-mounted Bijay Battery, which became a mule team battery.
     
  2. F-14B

    F-14B #iamPUROHIT Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2016
    Messages:
    2,075
    Likes Received:
    3,941
    Location:
    Most ancient Kingdom of cochin
    Jodhpur Lancers

    images (79).jpg
    went to the Great War. Sir Pertab, the 70-year-old Maharaja Regent of Jodhpur, himself accompanied the unit to France. Jodhpur Lancers fought at France and Flanders, Palestine and Syria during the whole of the War from Aug 1914 to Feb 1920. In the Jordan valley, at Haifa, and at Aleppo, the Jodhpur Lancers acquitted themselves gloriously. [1]

    Kashmir Rifles
     
  3. aditya g

    aditya g Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2014
    Messages:
    1,704
    Likes Received:
    3,623
    Location:
    India
    My intention was not to critique but to express a curiosity...............

     
    F-14B likes this.
  4. F-14B

    F-14B #iamPUROHIT Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2016
    Messages:
    2,075
    Likes Received:
    3,941
    Location:
    Most ancient Kingdom of cochin
    56th Punjabi Rifles (Frontier Force)
    56th Punjabi Rifles (Frontier Force)
    [​IMG]
    Active 1849 - 1922
    Country British India
    Branch Army
    Type Infantry
    Size 2 Battalions
    Nickname(s) Bhai Band
    Uniform Drab; faced black
    Engagements North West Frontier of India
    Indian Mutiny 1857-58
    Second Afghan War 1878-80
    First World War 1914-18
    Third Afghan War 1919
    The 56th Punjabi Rifles (Frontier Force) was an infantry regiment of the British Indian Army. It was raised in 1849 as the 2nd Regiment of Punjab Infantry. It was designated as the 56th Punjabi Rifles (Frontier Force) in 1906 and became 2nd Battalion 13th Frontier Force Rifles in 1922. In 1947, it was allocated to the Pakistan Army, where it continues to exist as 8th Battalion The Frontier Force Regiment
     
  5. F-14B

    F-14B #iamPUROHIT Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2016
    Messages:
    2,075
    Likes Received:
    3,941
    Location:
    Most ancient Kingdom of cochin
    Flag staff house new delhi

    The house is named after the Teen Murti (literally "three statues") Memorial by British sculptor, Leonard Jennings, which stands on the road junction in front of its extensive grounds. The memorial comprises life-size statues of three soldiers, and was built in 1922 in the memory of the Indian soldiers from three Indian princely states, namely; Jodhpur State, Hyderabad State and Mysore State who served present day Gaza Strip, Israel, Palestine during the World War I under British India Army.
    originally known as 'Flagstaff House' and was the residence of the Commander-in-Chief of the British Forces in India. Situated in a 30-acre estate,[3] the building is constructed of white stone and stucco, and faces the south side of the Rashtrapati Bhavan (Presidents House). It has arched entrance, recessed window, and the first floor has a pillared veranda on the back on the building which overlooks the lawns.

    1280px-Teen_murti_bhawan_22.jpg
     
  6. F-14B

    F-14B #iamPUROHIT Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2016
    Messages:
    2,075
    Likes Received:
    3,941
    Location:
    Most ancient Kingdom of cochin
    viceroy's commissioned officer (VCO) was a senior Indian member of the British Indian Army. VCOs were senior in rank to warrant officers in the British Army, and held a commission issued by the viceroy. Also known as "Indian officers" or "native officers", they were treated in almost all respects as commissioned officers, but only had authority over Indian troops and were subordinate to all British King's (and Queen's) commissioned officers and King's commissioned Indian officers.

    These ranks were created to facilitate effective liaison between the British officers and their native troops. The soldiers who were promoted to VCO rank had long service and good service records, spoke reasonably fluent English, and could act as a common liaison point between officers and men and as advisers to the British officers on Indian affairs.

    VCOs were treated and addressed with respect. Even a British officer would address a VCO as, for instance, "subedar sahib" or <name> "sahib".

    Ranks held by VCOs were:

    images (85).jpg
    An Indian VCO (JCO)
     
  7. F-14B

    F-14B #iamPUROHIT Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2016
    Messages:
    2,075
    Likes Received:
    3,941
    Location:
    Most ancient Kingdom of cochin
    King's Commissioned Indian Officer
    A King's commissioned Indian officer (KCIO) was an Indian officer of the British Indian Army who held a full King's commission after training at the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, in England, as opposed to the Indian commissioned officers (ICOs), who were trained at the Indian Military Academy at Dehra Dun, and the Viceroy's commissioned officers (VCOs), who were treated in almost all respects as commissioned officers, but who only had authority over Indian troops. KCIOs were introduced in the early 20th century under the Indianisation process. They were equivalent in every way to the British officers holding a King's commission (known in India as King's commissioned officers, or KCOs). They held the same ranks, and unlike VCOs had authority over British troops. In fact, most KCIOs served on attachment to a British unit for a year or two early in their careers.

    Commission would be opened to Indians for whom ten places would be reserved in the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, UK, to be trained as officers of the Indian Army.[1] The first cadets from both Sandhurst and another defence college, Daly College in Indore, India, were given the King's Commission.[1] There was great disquiet amongst the British, who disliked the idea of serving under native officers; others felt that without good breeding, a public school education, and sufficient suitable training, Indians would not become good officers and would neither be able to lead nor be accepted by the native troops. There was a firm belief among British officers and the home government that only the British educational system could provide the right kind of officer, and that it could do it only from suitable stock.[2]

    The Sandhurst training directly pitted young Indian men against young Europeans in conditions alien to their upbringing and experience, and not surprisingly the results were unsatisfactory. Of the first batch of 25 cadets admitted to Sandhurst, ten failed to meet the requisite standard, two died, two resigned, one was deprived of his commission, and ten passed. To remedy this, on 13 March 1922 the Prince of Wales Royal Indian Military College was established for preparing native Indian cadets for entry to Sandhurst.

    In the mean time, the first measure taken by the British government to "Indianise" the army - the Eight Unit Scheme of Indianisation - was announced on 17 February 1923. Indian proposals for faster induction were rejected, and equally unrealistic plans for indianisation over forty years, with restricted kinds of commission, were suggested. Finally, only eight units of the Indian Army were accepted by the British for Indianisation - only five infantry battalions out of 104, two cavalry regiments out of 21, and one pioneer battalion out of seven. They were to be reorganised on the British Army model, with King's Commissioned Indian Officers at every officer level and Indian Warrant Officers replacing Viceroy's Commissioned Officers.

    images (86).jpg
     
  8. Joe Shearer

    Joe Shearer New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2009
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    1

    I believe that should correctly be titled The Indian Police Act of 1861.



    It may be of passing interest to readers that the functioning of the police continued to be governed by the antediluvian Indian Police Act of 1861.


    A happier positioning would have placed this paragraph second, rather than third, indicating clearly that the "It" referred to was the Imperial (later, the Indian) Police, and not the Indian Police Service.



    Perhaps. Perhaps not. The powers of the Assistant Superintendents was tightly restricted; it was understood that this was a probationary post, and it was also understood that the Chhota Sahib should be seen and not heard. A Circle Inspector would be vastly kind and deferential to the Chhota Sahib, but would not tolerate interference in his crime investigation duties.

    Second, the police actually had no authority to open fire without the direction of a magistrate. In case of a riot, a formulaic warning had to be delivered to a mob, before the police were instructed to open fire. This may remind readers about the original meaning of 'reading' somebody 'the Riot Act'; a rioter was literally warned by a recitation of the relevant sections that strong action would be taken if the warning was ignored.

    There were lots of exceptions; the police took the law into their own hands quite readily, although blanket instructions from a senior enough magistrate usually covered them with a strong protective sheet sufficient to cover any high-handed action taken.

    Third, this specific disability led to the Commissionerates. The Commissioner of Police, Calcutta, was usually IP, JP, meaning that he was an appointed Justice of the Peace, a magistrate. He therefore had the power to order his force to open fire (or do any of the less definitely fatal options, such as lathi charges or mounted police charges or (decades later) tear gas shell discharges.

    There were in those days close to independence 18,000 Calcutta Police, including the mounted police, and 48,000 West Bengal Police; the numbers are changed now. At that time, the Indian Navy was 36,000 strong.

    West Bengal had 6 DIGs; today there are a few dozens; one IG, where today there are a large number, and no DGs (the post was created, I think, in 1979). In order to stay within the archaic 1861 Act, one of the DGs is designated the DG & IGP, and functions as the IG within the meaning of the Act; the other IGs and DGs effectively hold personal rank and are not occupants of the single cadre position allowed for Inspectors General within the Act.

    It is not very clear why this quintessentially civilian service should be mentioned in this excellent thread.

    Fourth, why the discussion on the AFSPA is so frustrating is the complete lack of realisation that the Armed Forces have no authority, no jurisdiction to act within the boundaries of the country except in case of war or in case of being formally called upon to maintain law and order by the civil administration. It is for this reason that the British Horse Guards are preceded by a mounted Inspector of Police; only the policeman (or policewoman) can halt traffic; the soldiers cannot.

    On an historical note, Eric Blair, better known as George Orwell, was an Imperial Police member, from Burma. Among the well-known officers there was Charles Tegart, hated by the revolutionaries, whom he hunted down and killed, and John Anderson. It is not that they were a monolithic force; there is that famous story of Tegart assaulting Anderson, because Anderson was a Black and Tan, hateful to the Catholic Irish, as much as the IP itself was hateful to the Indian revolutionary.

    The last of the IP cadres is gone; in 2012, according to a ghoulish exercise conducted by HE M. K. Narayanan, then Governor of West Bengal, and himself an ex-IPS officer, who had occupied the highest rank open to the police in independent India, the post of Director of the IB, and then was the NSA, there were three IP officers left, one of them being Aswini Kumar, the swashbuckling cowboy who was a legend in the Punjab long before K. P. S. Gill. And now there are none.

    @jbgt90
     
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2017
    F-14B likes this.
  9. F-14B

    F-14B #iamPUROHIT Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2016
    Messages:
    2,075
    Likes Received:
    3,941
    Location:
    Most ancient Kingdom of cochin


    Shows Troops of the RIASC
     
  10. F-14B

    F-14B #iamPUROHIT Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2016
    Messages:
    2,075
    Likes Received:
    3,941
    Location:
    Most ancient Kingdom of cochin
    Men of India



    Shows the BIA soilders drilling
     
  11. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2009
    Messages:
    33,265
    Likes Received:
    19,459
    Location:
    EST, USA
    @Joe Shearer, welcome to DFI. Please introduce yourself in the Members' Corner and read the rules.

    Enjoy your stay.
     
    Kunal Biswas likes this.
  12. F-14B

    F-14B #iamPUROHIT Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2016
    Messages:
    2,075
    Likes Received:
    3,941
    Location:
    Most ancient Kingdom of cochin
    not a special force in the modern sense but more akin to the LRRPs of Vietnam fame or the SAS LRPs in the Malayan emergency period but the above mentioned operated on the ground work
    established by the Standard Operating Procedures laid by these bunch of men

    Chindits



    Active 1942–1945
    Country [​IMG] British India
    Branch [​IMG] Army of India
    Type Special forces
    Role Asymmetric warfare
    Size 9,000 to 12,000
    Garrison/HQ Jhansi, India
    Engagements Burma Campaign of World War II

    The 77th Indian Infantry Brigade, otherwise known as the Chindits, was gradually formed in the area around Jhansi in the summer of 1942. Wingate took charge of the training of the troops in the jungles of central India during the rainy season. Half of the Chindits were British: the 13th Battalion, the King's Liverpool Regiment (nominally a second-line battalion, which contained a large number of older men) and men from the former Bush Warfare School in Burma, who were formed into 142 Commando Company. The other portion of the force consisted of the 3rd Battalion, the 2nd Gurkha Rifles (a battalion that had only just been raised) and the 2nd Battalion, the Burma Rifles (a composite unit formed from several depleted battalions of Burmese troops that had retreated into India in 1942).

    Wingate trained this force as long-range penetration units that were to be supplied by stores parachuted or dropped from transport aircraft, and were to use close air support as a substitute for heavy artillery.[3] They would penetrate the jungle on foot, essentially relying on surprise through mobility to target enemy lines of communication (a tactic that the Japanese had previously used in 1942 to great effect against British forces in Singapore and Burma).[1]

    The standard brigade and battalion structures were abandoned. The force was instead formed into eight columns, each of which was organised as: an infantry rifle company (with nine Bren light machine guns and three 2-inch mortars); a support group with the heavy weapons (four Boys anti-tank rifles, two medium Vickers machine guns and two light anti-aircraft guns); a reconnaissance platoon from the Burma Rifles; and a sabotage group from 142 Commando Company. Small detachments from the Royal Air Force (equipped with radios to call in air support), Royal Corps of Signals and Royal Army Medical Corps were attached to the column headquarters.[4] The heavy weapons, radios, reserve ammunition and rations and other stores were carried on mules, which would also provide an emergency source of food once their loads had been depleted.[1] With 57 mule handlers, each British column numbered 306 men (the Gurkha columns were slightly stronger, with 369 men).[4]

    Each man carried more than 72 pounds (33 kg) of equipment, which was proportionally more than the mules carrying the support weapons and other stores. This included a personal weapon, such as the SMLE rifle or Sten Gun, ammunition, grenades, a machete or Gurkha kukri knife, seven days' rations, groundsheet, change of uniform and other assorted items. Much of this load was carried in an Everest carrier, which was essentially a metal rucksack frame without a pack.[5]

    Shortly before the first operation, one column was broken up to bring the remaining seven up to full strength. Two or more columns were commanded by a group headquarters, which in turn was commanded by the brigade headquarters

    First Chindit Expedition 1943. Codenamed Operation Longcloth[edit]
    Headquarters 77th Indian Infantry Brigade

    Commander Brigadier Orde Wingate
    Brigade Major Major R.B.G. Bromhead (succeeded by Major G.M. Anderson)
    Staff Captain Captain H.J. Lord
    Deception party

    Officer Commanding (O.C.) Major Jeffries
    No. 1 Group (Southern)

    Officer Commanding (O.C.) Lieutenant Colonel Leigh Alexander (died during the operation)
    1 Column (Major Dunlop)
    2 Column (Major Burnett)
    No. 2 Group (Northern)

    O.C Lieutenant Colonel S.A. Cooke
    3 Column (Major Michael Calvert)
    4 Column (Major R.A. Conron)(replaced by Major R.B. Bromhead March 1, 1943)
    5 Column (Major Bernard Fergusson)
    7 Column (Major K. Gilkes)
    8 Column (Major Walter Scott)
    HQ Group (Burma Rifles)

    O.C. Lt-Colonel L.G. Wheeler 2nd Burma Rifles (replaced by Captain P.C. Buchanan on the death of Lt-Colonel Wheeler)
    Second Chindit Expedition 1944. Codenamed Operation Thursday[edit]
    Headquarters 3rd Indian Infantry Division

    Division Commander Major-General Orde.C. Wingate (succeeded by Major-General W.D.A. Lentaigne)
    Deputy Commander Major-General G.W. Symes, (succeeded by Brigadier D. Tulloch)
    Brigadier General Staff Brigadier D. Tulloch,( succeeded by Brigadier H.T. Alexander)
    Locations of Headquarters
    Rear HQ at Gwalior, Central India
    Main HQ first at Imphal later at Sylhet, Assam
    Launching HQ at Lalaghat
    Tactical/Forward HQ, Shaduzup, Burma
    Thunder 3rd West African Brigade

    Officer Commanding (O.C.) Brigadier A.H. Gillmore, (succeeded by Brigadier A.H.G. Ricketts): 10 HQ column
    6th Battalion, Nigeria Regiment: 66 and 39 Columns
    7th Battalion, Nigeria Regiment: 29 and 35 Columns
    12th Battalion, Nigeria Regiment: 12 and 43 Columns
    3rd West African Field Ambulance: Support
    (From disbanded 70th British Infantry Division );

    Javelin British 14th Infantry Brigade

    O.C. Brigadier Thomas Brodie: 59 HQ column
    2nd Battalion, Black Watch: 42 and 73 Columns - Lt.Col.G.C.Green
    1st Battalion, Bedfordshire and Hertfordshire Regiment: 16 and 61 Columns
    2nd Battalion, York and Lancaster Regiment: 65 and 84 Columns
    7th Battalion, Leicestershire Regiment: 47 and 74 Columns
    54th Field Company Royal Engineers & Medical Detachment:support
    Enterprise British 16th Infantry Brigade

    O.C. Brigadier B.E. Fergusson: 99 HQ column
    2nd Battalion, The Queen's Royal Regiment (West Surrey); 21 and 22 Columns
    2nd Battalion, Leicestershire Regiment ; 17 and 71 Columns
    51/69 Field Regiment Royal Artillery 51 and 69 Columns (infantry columns made up of R.A. personnel)
    45th Reconnaissance Regiment ; 45 and 54 Columns (infantry columns made up recce units)
    2nd Field Company Royal Engineers & Medical Detachment: support
    Emphasis 77th Indian Infantry Brigade

    O.C. Brigadier Mike Calvert: 25 HQ column
    1st Battalion, The King's Regiment (Liverpool): 81 and 82 Columns
    1st Battalion, The Lancashire Fusiliers: 20 and 50 Columns
    1st Battalion, South Staffordshire Regiment: 38 and 80 Columns
    3rd Battalion, 6th Gurkha Rifles: 36 and 63 Columns
    3rd Battalion, 9th Gurkha Rifles: 57 and 93 Columns
    142 Company, Hong Kong Volunteers & Medical and veterinary detachments: support
    Profound 111th Indian Infantry Brigade

    O.C. Brigadier W.D.A. Lentaigne, (succeeded first by Major John Masters and then by Brigadier Morris): 48 HQ Column
    1st Battalion, The Cameronians: 26 and 90 Columns
    2nd Battalion, The King's Own Royal Regiment (Lancaster): 41 and 46 Columns
    3rd Battalion (part), 4th Gurkha Rifles: 30 Column
    Mixed Field Company Royal Engineers/Royal Indian Engineers & Medical and veterinary detachments: support
    Morris Force

    O.C. Lt-Colonel (later promoted Brigadier) J.R. Morris
    4th Battalion, 9th Gurkha Rifles: 49 and 94 Columns
    3rd Battalion (part), 4th Gurkha Rifles: 40 Column
    Dah Force

    O.C. Lieut-Colonel D.C. Herring
    Kachin Levies
    Bladet (Blain's Detachment)

    O.C. Major Blain
    Gliderborne commando engineers
    Royal Artillery Supporting non-mobile units designed to defend Chindit Jungle Fortresses.

    R, S and U Troops 160th Field Regiment Royal Artillery (All 25 pounders)
    W,X,Y, and Z Troops 69th Light Anti Aircraft Regiment (40mm Bofors)
    Support Units

    NO 1 Air Commando USAAF – strike and casualty evacuation (until 1/5/1944 only)
    Eastern Air Command – supply
    U. S.Army 900th Field Unit (engineers)
    Divisional Support Troops

    2nd Battalion Burma Rifles – one section assigned per column except for columns in the 3rd West African Brigade
    145th Brigade Company R.A.S.C.
    219th Field Park Company, Royal Engineers
    61st Air Supply Company R.A.S.C.
    2nd Indian Air Supply Company, R.I.A.S.C.
    Galahad 5307th Composite Unit (Provisional) US Army

    1st Battalion; Red and White Combat Teams
    2nd Battalion; Blue and Green Combat Teams
    3rd Battalion; Khaki Orange Combat Teams
    Also known as Merrill's Marauders and after being trained were transferred to General Joseph Stilwell's Northern Combat Area Command and operated independently of the Chindits.
    23rd British Infantry Brigade

    O.C Brigadier Lancelot Perowne: 32 HQ column
    1st Battalion Essex Regiment:Columns 44, 56
    2nd Battalion Duke of Wellington's Regiment (West Riding): Columns 33, 76
    4th Battalion Border Regiment:Columns 34, 55
    60th Field Regiment, Royal Artillery: Columns 60, 68 (fighting as infantry)
    12th Field Company Royal Engineers & Medical Detachment: Support
     
  13. F-14B

    F-14B #iamPUROHIT Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2016
    Messages:
    2,075
    Likes Received:
    3,941
    Location:
    Most ancient Kingdom of cochin
    Malakand Levies

    In 1920, when the Swat Levies were reorganized, Sadullah Khan, known as Khan Sahib was promoted as Subedar Major and he thus became the first Subedar Major of Swat Levies. In 1950 regular police was introduced in Swat by conversion of the Levies personnel into it. In Chitral, the border police force was reorganized and separated from Swat Levies while in Dir district and Malakand Agency Levies personnel were given separate designations as Dir Levies and Malakand Levies. Those personnel of Swat Levies who were serving in Malakand Agency, formed the nucleus for the Malakand Levies
     
  14. F-14B

    F-14B #iamPUROHIT Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2016
    Messages:
    2,075
    Likes Received:
    3,941
    Location:
    Most ancient Kingdom of cochin
    Indian Staff Corps
    The Indian Staff Corps was a branch of the Indian Army during the British Raj. Separate Staff Corps were formed in 1861 for the Bengal, Madras and Bombay Armies, which were later combined into the Indian Army. They were meant to provide officers for the native regiments and for the staff and army departments. They were also designed to offer placements for civil and political appointments for posts which Indian Army officers might be eligible. Those officers who were already employed by the Army had the option to join the Staff Corps or to stay employed under the old conditions of work. In that sense, the Indian Staff Corps was seen by the majority of entrants as synonymous with the Regular Officer Corps of the Indian Armies. This is not to be confused with officers holding staff appointments.

    To reduce confusion, the term "Indian Staff Corps" in relation to officers on regimental duty was withdrawn by Lord Kitchener during his unification of the Indian Army. From that time, officers were gazetted to the "Indian Army".

    9ee214b4bea69fc450c2f00feb175e83--indian-army-militaria.jpg

    https://i.pinimg.com/736x/9e/e2/14/9ee214b4bea69fc450c2f00feb175e83--indian-army-militaria.jpg
     
  15. F-14B

    F-14B #iamPUROHIT Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2016
    Messages:
    2,075
    Likes Received:
    3,941
    Location:
    Most ancient Kingdom of cochin
    11th Prince Albert Victor's Own Cavalry (Frontier Force)

    [​IMG]
    The 21st Prince Albert Victor's Own Cavalry (Frontier Force) (Daly's Horse) was raised as the 1st Punjab Irregular Cavalry by Lieutenant Henry Daly at Peshawar on 18 May 1849. It was one of five regiments of Punjab Cavalry raised to guard the North West Frontier of India, which soon became famous as part of the legendary Punjab Frontier Force or the Piffers. Over the next decades, the regiment saw extensive service on the Frontier. During the Indian Mutiny of 1857-58, the regiment operated in North India and took part in the Siege of Delhi and the Relief of Lucknow, where Lieutenant John Watson won the Victoria Cross. During the Second Afghan War of 1878-80, it formed part of Kandahar Field Force and fought in the Battle of Ahmad Khel. In 1890, Prince Albert Victor, the Crown Prince of Britain was gazetted as their Colonel-in-Chief, giving his name to the regiment, which has endured to this day. During the First World War, the regiment served in the Mesopotamian Campaign as part of 6th Indian Cavalry Brigade. It fought on the Tigris Front and took part in the capture of Kut al Amara and Baghdad. It also fought in the Actions of Istabulat, Ramadi, Daur and Tikrit. Later it saw service in Kurdistan and took part in the capture of Kirkuk.
    • 1849 1st Punjab Irregular Cavalry
    • 1851 1st Regiment of Cavalry, Punjab Irregular Force
    • 1865 1st Regiment of Cavalry, Punjab Frontier Force
      [​IMG]
      A sowar of the 1st (Prince Albert Victor’s Own) Regiment of Cavalry, Punjab Frontier Force, 1900. Painting by Chater Paul Chater.
    • 1890 1st (Prince Albert Victor’s Own) Regiment of Cavalry, Punjab Frontier Force
    • 1901 1st (Prince Albert Victor’s Own) Punjab Cavalry
    • 1903 21st Prince Albert Victor’s Own Cavalry (Frontier Force)
    • 1904 21st Prince Albert Victor’s Own Cavalry (Frontier Force) (Daly’s Horse)

    The 23rd Cavalry was raised as the 3rd Punjab Irregular Cavalry by Lieutenant WG Prendergast at Lahore in 1849, and it too saw extensive service on the Frontier with the Punjab Frontier Force. During the Second Afghan War, it took part in Lord Roberts' famous march from Kabul to Kandahar as part of the Kabul Field Force and fought in the Battle of Kandahar. During the First World War, the regiment served in Mesopotamia as part of the 11th Indian Cavalry Brigade and was part of General Townsend's failed advance towards Baghdad. It then served on the Tigris Front. Later on, it moved to the Euphrates Front and fought in the Battles of Khan Baghdadi and Sharqat. One of its squadron served in Persian Arabistan. On their return to Indian they saw service in the Third Afghan War of 1919.[1][2]

    • 1849 3rd Punjab Irregular Cavalry
    • 1851 3rd Regiment of Cavalry, Punjab Irregular Force
    • 1865 3rd Regiment of Cavalry, Punjab Frontier Force
    • 1901 3rd Punjab Cavalry
    • 1903 23rd Punjab Cavalry (Frontier Force)
    After the First World War, the number of Indian cavalry regiments was reduced from thirty-nine to twenty-one. However, instead of disbanding the surplus units, it was decided to amalgamate them in pairs. This resulted in renumbering and renaming of the entire cavalry line. The 21st and 23rd Cavalry were amalgamated in 1921 to form 11th Prince Albert Victor’s Own Cavalry (Frontier Force). The uniform of PAVO Cavalry was blue with scarlet facings. The new regiment's badge consisted of the Kandahar Star representing the five rivers of the Punjab. Its class composition was one squadron each of Punjabi Muslims, Sikhs and Dogras. The regiment was mechanised in 1940. During the Second World War, it initially served in Syria and Iran, and then went on to North Africa, where it fought in the Battle of Gazala. It then moved to Burma, where it greatly distinguished itself against the Japanese. In 1946, the regiment was sent to the Dutch East Indies (Indonesia) to pacify the country after the surrender of the Japanese.[1][3]

    On Partition of India in 1947, PAVO Cavalry was allotted to Pakistan
    • 1921 21st/23rd Cavalry (amalgamation)
    • 1922 11th Prince Albert Victor’s Own Cavalry (Frontier Force)
    • 1927 Prince Albert Victor’s Own Cavalry (11th Frontier Force)
    • 1956 11th Cavalry (Frontier Force)
    Battle Honours
    Delhi 1857, Lucknow, Ahmad Khel, Kandahar 1880, Afghanistan 1878-80, Kut al Amara 1917, Baghdad, Khan Baghdadi, Sharqat, Mesopotamia 1915-18, Afghanistan 1919, El Mechili, Halfaya 1941, Bir Hacheim, North Africa 1940-43, Relief of Kohima, Monywa 1945, Mandalay, Myinmu Bridgehead, Capture of Meiktila, The Irrawaddy, Rangoon Road, Burma 1942-45,
     
    aditya10r likes this.
  16. F-14B

    F-14B #iamPUROHIT Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2016
    Messages:
    2,075
    Likes Received:
    3,941
    Location:
    Most ancient Kingdom of cochin
    12th Cavalry (Frontier Force)

    [​IMG]
    It was formed in the British Indian army in 1922 by the amalgamation of 22nd Sam Browne's Cavalry (Frontier Force) and 25th Cavalry (Frontier Force)
    The 22nd Sam Browne's Cavalry (Frontier Force) was raised in 1849 at Lahore by Lieutenant Samuel J. Browne as the 2nd Punjab Irregular Cavalry. It was one of five regiments of Punjab Cavalry raised to guard the North West Frontier of India, which soon became famous as part of the legendary Punjab Frontier Force or the "Piffers". Over the next decades, the regiment saw extensive service on the Frontier.[3] During the Indian Mutiny of 1857, the regiment was engaged in the Siege of Delhi, Relief of Lucknow, the Battle of Agra and the Campaign in Rohilkhand. In one of the actions, their commandant, Captain Sam Browne was awarded the Victoria Cross. His citation reads:

    In an engagement with the rebels, Captain Browne, whilst advancing upon the enemy's position, pushed on with one orderly sowar upon a 9-pounder gun and attacked the gunners, preventing them from re-loading and attacking the infantry who were advancing to the attack. In the conflict which ensued, Captain Browne received two sword cuts, one on the left knee and one which severed his left arm at the shoulder, but not before he had cut down one of his assailants. The gun was eventually captured and the gunner killed.
    It was the loss of his arm that caused Browne to invent the famous Sam Browne belt, still in the use of many of today's armies. The original belt is on display in the India Room at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst.

    Meanwhile, Captain Dighton Probyn was also awarded the Victoria Cross for gallantry, while serving with the 2nd Punjab Cavalry. His citation reads:

    On many occasions during the period 1857-1858 in India, Captain Probyn performed gallant and daring acts. On one occasion, at the Battle of Agra, when his squadron charged the rebel infantry, he was sometimes separated from his men and surrounded by five or six sepoys. He defended himself and, before his own men had joined him, had cut down two of his assailants.
    [​IMG]
    Officers of the 2nd Punjab Cavalry, 1880.
    During the Second Afghan War of 1878-80, the 2nd Punjab Cavalry was with the Kandahar Field Force, and fought at the Battle of Ahmad Khel in April 1880. During the First World War, the regiment served in the Mesopotamia Campaign.[2][3]

    Name changes[edit]
    • 1849 2nd Punjab Irregular Cavalry
    • 1851 2nd Regiment of Cavalry, Punjab Irregular Force
    • 1861 2nd Regiment of Punjab Cavalry, Punjab Frontier Force
    • 1901 2nd Punjab Cavalry
    • 1903 22nd Cavalry (Frontier Force)
    • 1904 22nd Sam Browne's Cavalry (Frontier Force)
    The 25th Cavalry (Frontier Force) was raised by Captain Robert Fitzgerald as the 5th Punjab Irregular Cavalry at Multan in 1849. During the Indian Mutiny they were part of the besieging army at Delhi and took part in the Relief of Lucknow. One squadron fought at Bareilly, where two of its Indian officers won the Order of British India and nine other ranks received the Indian Order of Merit. The regiment was involved in a number of small actions on the North West Frontier with the Punjab Frontier Force. In March 1860, 150 men under an Indian officer attacked a 3,000 strong armed force of Mahsuds and Waziris at Tank, killing 300 and dispersing the others. In January 1867, an Indian officer with 27 sowars charged a body of 1,000 tribesmen, killed 150 and captured most of the rest. During the Second Afghan War, the 5th Punjab Cavalry were present at the capture of Charasiah and Frederick Roberts the Commanding General ordered that they and the 9th Lancers should have the honour of escorting him into Kabul. During the attack on the Asmai Heights in December 1879, near Kabul, Captain William John Vousden made repeated charges with a small body of men of the 5th Punjab Cavalry, passing through the ranks of an overwhelming force again and again until the enemy fled. Vousden received a Victoria Cross and his ten surviving men the Indian Order of Merit. During the First World War, it served in German East Africa, followed by service in the Third Afghan War of 1919.[2][3]

    [​IMG]
    A Pathan Daffadar of 25th Cavalry (Frontier Force). Watercolour by AC Lovett, 1910.
    Name changes[edit]
    • 1849 5th Punjab Irregular Cavalry
    • 1851 5th Regiment of Cavalry, Punjab Irregular Force
    • 1861 5th Regiment of Punjab Cavalry, Punjab Frontier Force
    • 1901 5th Punjab Cavalry
    • 1903 25th Cavalry (Frontier Force)
    12th Cavalry (Frontier Force)[edit]
    After the First World War, the number of Indian cavalry regiments was reduced from thirty-nine to twenty-one. However, instead of disbanding the surplus units, it was decided to amalgamate them in pairs. This resulted in renumbering and renaming of the entire cavalry line. The 22nd Sam Browne's Cavalry (Frontier Force) and 25th Cavalry (Frontier Force) were amalgamated in 1921 to form 12th Cavalry. The uniform of 12th Cavalry was scarlet with blue facings. The badge showed a mounted figure within a circle carrying the title 'Sam Browne's Cavalry XII FF' with a crown above. Its class composition was one squadron each of Punjabi Muslims, Sikhs and Dogras. In 1937, 12th Cavalry became the training regiment of 2nd Indian Cavalry Group at Ferozepur. It was converted into a training centre in 1940 by amalgamating it with 15th Lancers.[2]

    On the partition of India in 1947, this training centre was transferred to Pakistan. On 15 January 1955,
     
  17. F-14B

    F-14B #iamPUROHIT Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2016
    Messages:
    2,075
    Likes Received:
    3,941
    Location:
    Most ancient Kingdom of cochin
    3rd Madras Regiment

    [​IMG]
    The 3rd Madras Regiment was an infantry regiment of the British Indian Army formed after the World War I reforms of the Indian Army. The infantry regiments were converted into large regiments with four or five battalions in each regiment plus a training battalion, always numbered the 10th The regiment was later disbanded for economic reasons. The 3rd and 4th Battalions were disbanded in 1923, the 2nd and 10th in 1926 and the 1st in 1928.
    It was due to the 'spirited advocacy' of the then Governor of Madras Sir Arthur Hope, that the 3rd Madras Regiment was restored to the Army List in 1941 ; the old 11th, 12th, 13th and 15th Territorial battalions were converted into regular units, becoming the 1st to 4th Battalions of the reconstituted Regiment, with the Regimental Centre at Madukkarai (Coimbatore). Hectic training activity commenced and several other battalions were raised.

    The 4th Battalion joined the War at Imphal in 1943 and distinguished itself in the fierce fighting that ensued in Tamu in March 1944. Capt RS Noronha tenaciously held his company defences for sixteen days against repeated attacks, inflicting heavy casualties on the enemy, for which he was awarded Military Cross. He was again instrumental in launching a feint attack to relieve pressure on 19 Inf Div bridge-head for which he was awarded a Bar to Military Cross.

    In October 1945, all the Infantry Regiments of the Indian Army (barring Punjab) shed their numbers and the 3rd Madras Regiment became simply The Madras Regiment. At the time of Independence it had four battalions, 1st to 4th, with the Regimental Centre having shifted in 1946 to Trichinapally.

     
  18. F-14B

    F-14B #iamPUROHIT Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2016
    Messages:
    2,075
    Likes Received:
    3,941
    Location:
    Most ancient Kingdom of cochin
    91st Punjabis (Light Infantry)
    [​IMG]

    The 91st Punjabis (Light Infantry) was an infantry regiment of the British Indian Army. The regiment was raised in 1800 as a battalion of Madras Native Infantry. It was designated as the 91st Punjabis in 1903 and became 3rd Battalion 8th Punjab Regiment in 1922. In 1947, it was allocated to Pakistan Army

    The origin of regiment can be traced back to 1759 when it was first raised as Irregular Troops of East India Company and was formed into a Battalion of "Coast Sepoys". It was converted into regulars on 1 January 1800 at Trichonopoly as the 1st Battalion 16th Regiment of Trichnopoly Native Infantry by Lieutenant Colonel S Jennerett and was known as Jennerett ki Paltan (Jennerett's Battalion). It was composed mostly of Muslims, Tamils and Telugus of South India. In 1811, it was styled as Trichonopoly Light Infantry as reward for a 25-mile forced march in support of a retreating force; when it arrived just in time to turn the tables in a minor engagement near Mysore. In 1817-19, the regiment took part in Third Anglo-Maratha War, where it greatly distinguished itself in the Battle of Mahidpur. In 1824, it was redesignated as the 31st Regiment of Madras Native Infantry.

    In 1887, the battalion was formed into SHWEBO BATTALION of UPPER BURMA POLICE and between 1887-1890 remained engaged in eliminating the rebels of SHWEBO area in Central Burma where it captured the WUNTHO SWABWA's DAH and SHEATH which latter became part of its cap badge. On 1 February 1892 the battalion was designated as 31st Madras Light Infantry( 6th Burma Battalion)with Capt HDU Keary as the Commanding Officer who went to command it for 23 years at stretch till 1909.From 1900to1912 battalion operated in China as a part of Expeditionary Force in Boxer Rebellion. On 3 October 1903 the battalion was renamed as 91st PUNJABIS. On 6 February 1906 the Unit was presented Regimental and Royal Colors at Bhamo, Burma. After 31 years of service in Burma. the Unit proceeded overseas in 1916 for World War 1 where it saw actions at Mesopotamia and Palestine.

    Subsequent to the reforms brought about in the Indian Army by Lord Kitchener in 1903, all former Madras units had 60 added to their numbers. Consequently, the regiment's designation was changed to 91st Punjabis (Light Infantry). In 1912, Major General Henry D'Urban Keary was appointed Colonel of the Regiment, Who had commanded the regiment from 1892 to 1909.

    On the outbreak of the First World War, the regiment was still stationed in Burma. It moved to Mesopotamia in 1916 and participated in operations on both the Tigris and the Euphrates Fronts, including the First Battle of Ramadi. In 1918, the regiment moved to Palestine and took part in the Battle of Megiddo, which led to the annihilation of Turkish Army in Palestine.
    Subsequent to the reforms brought about in the Indian Army by Lord Kitchener in 1903, all former Madras units had 60 added to their numbers. Consequently, the regiment's designation was changed to 91st Punjabis (Light Infantry). In 1912, Major General Henry D'Urban Keary was appointed Colonel of the Regiment, Who had commanded the regiment from 1892 to 1909.
    On the outbreak of the First World War, the regiment was still stationed in Burma. It moved to Mesopotamia in 1916 and participated in operations on both the Tigris and the Euphrates Fronts,

    including the First Battle of Ramadi. In 1918, the regiment moved to Palestine and took part in the Battle of Megiddo, which led to the annihilation of Turkish Army in Palestine.
    After the First World War,the battalion returned to India and in March 1921 became part of 8th Infantry Group, however, in October 1923 its title was changed to 3rd Battalion of 8 Punjab Regiment. Battalion operated in South Waziristan, Chitral, Wucha Garhi and Khujuri Plains up to 1930.From 1930 to 1941 the battalion remained in Jhansi, Bombay and Poona.In 1930 the new Colors were presented at Jhansi, whereas old colors were deposited in Viceroy's House. On 9 August battalion embarked on active service during World War II as part of 8th Infantry Division and took part in numerous operations of Italian Campaign.3/8th Punjab fought with great gallantry in the Italian Campaign and suffered 1289 casualties including 314 killed. It was awarded numerous gallantry awards including the Victoria Cross. It was on 12 May 1944 that Sepoy Kamal Ram was awarded Victoria Cross at Gustav Lines. He was the youngest VC of his time at the age of 19 years. Later he retired as Subedar Major from the Indian Army. At the time of partition,in 1947, the 8th Punjab Regiment was stationed at Allahabad and was allocated to Pakistan Army
    • 1759 - Coast Sepoys Battalion of Irregular Troops of East India Company
    • 1800 - 1st Battalion 16th Regiment Madras Native Infantry
    • 1812 - 1st Battalion 16th Regiment (Trichonopoly) Madras Native Infantry or Trichonopoly Light Infantry
      [​IMG]
      Sepoy 31st Regiment (Trichonopoly) Madras (Light) Infantry. Illustration by Richard Simkin, c. 1888.
    • 1824 - 31st Regiment Madras Native Infantry or Trichonopoly Light Infantry
    • 1885 - 31st Regiment (Trichonopoly) Madras (Light) Infantry
    • 1887 - SHWEBO Battalion of Upper Burma Military Police
    • 1892 - 31st Regiment (6th Burma Battalion) Madras (Light) Infantry
    • 1901 - 31st Burma Light Infantry
    • 1903 - 91st Punjabis
    • 1904 - 91st Punjabis (Light Infantry)
    • 1906 - Presented Colors at Bhamo, Burma
    • 1918 - 1st Battalion 91st Punjabis (Light Infantry) or 1/91st Punjabis (Light Infantry)
    • 1921 - 91st Punjabis (Light Infantry)as part of 8th Infantry Group
    • 1923 - 3rd Battalion of 8th Punjab Regiment or 3/8th Punjab
    • 1930 - Presented new Colors at Jhansi, India
    • 1944 - Sepoy Kamal Ram awarded Victoria Cross at Gustave Lines, Italy-WWII
    • 1947 - Became part of Pakistan Army and moved to Peshawar
     
  19. F-14B

    F-14B #iamPUROHIT Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2016
    Messages:
    2,075
    Likes Received:
    3,941
    Location:
    Most ancient Kingdom of cochin
    achievement of Alwar state

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    Alwar Lancers: Commandant and a Chohan Rajput (with lance), 1910. Watercolour by Major Alfred Crowdy Lovett (1862-1919), 1910. The Alwar Lancers were an independent Indian state force that joined the Imperial Service Troops (IST) scheme in 1888. This had been established to train part of the troops of some Indian states to the standard of the Indian Army. The Alwar IST troops were used both on the North West Frontier and in Boxer Rebellion in 1900.

    Picture source :https://wiki.fibis.org/images/thumb/2/2a/Alwar_Lancers.jpg/350px-Alwar_Lancers.jpg
     
  20. F-14B

    F-14B #iamPUROHIT Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2016
    Messages:
    2,075
    Likes Received:
    3,941
    Location:
    Most ancient Kingdom of cochin
    2nd King Edward VII's Own Gurkha Rifles (The Sirmoor Rifles)

    [​IMG]

    The 2nd King Edward VII's Own Gurkha Rifles (The Sirmoor Rifles) was a rifle regiment of the British Indian Army before being transferred to the British Army comprising Gurkha soldiers of Nepalese origin on India's independence in 1947. The 4th Battalion joined the Indian Army as the 5th Battalion, 8th Gurkha Rifles (Sirmoor Rifles), where it exists to this day. As part of the British Army, the regiment served in Malaya, Hong Kong and Brunei until 1994 when it was amalgamated with the other three British Army Gurkha regiments to form the Royal Gurkha Rifles. It is the only Gurkha regiment which did not have Khukuri on its cap badge

    The regiment was first raised in 1815 as The Sirmoor Battalion.[2] This was the first Gurkha unit in the service of the East India Company to see action, during the 3rd Mahratta War in 1817. The regiment, by now named the 8th (Sirmoor) Local Battalion, gained its first battle honour at Bhurtpore in 1825.[3] During the First Sikh War, the regiment fought at Bhudaiwal and Sobraon, as well as the Battle of Aliwal. Personnel carried colours at the time, and the flagpole was broken by cannon fire. The colour itself was seized by the Sikhs but reclaimed by a small party of Gurkhas led by a Havildar who chopped their way into the densely packed enemy lines

    During the Indian Mutiny, the Sirmoor Battalion was one of the Indian regiments that remained loyal to Britain. It was during this that the regiment took part in the defence of Hindu Rao's House, near Delhi.[4] For their part in the action, the Sirmoor Battalion was presented with the Queen's Truncheon, which became a replacement for the colours that they relinquished when the regiment became a rifle regiment in 1858.[nb 1][4] With the decision to number the Gurkha regiments in 1861, the Sirmoor Rifles became the 2nd Gúrkha Regiment. In 1876, which then acquired a royal patron in the then Prince of Wales, becoming the 2nd (Prince of Wales's Own) Gúrkha Regiment (the Sirmoor Rifles)

    During the First World War, the 2nd Gurkhas (by now named the 2nd King Edward's Own Gurkha Rifles), along with the other regiments of the Gurkha Brigade, served initially in Flanders. In 1915, the 2nd Battalion moved to Egypt, before returning to India in 1916. The 1st Battalion went to Persia and Mesopotamia in 1916, assisting in the fall of Baghdad.[6] In 1919 it was assigned to the Norperforce in Iran
    The Second World War saw the 2nd Gurkhas serving in many different theatres; the 1st Battalion was initially in Cyprus before moving to North Africa as part of 7th Indian Infantry Brigade, 4th Indian Division, where it fought at El Alamein. Following this it took part in the invasion of Italy, taking part in the battle for Monte Cassino. The 2nd Battalion meanwhile spent much of the war as prisoners of the Japanese after being captured in Malaya. The 3rd Battalion (raised during the war) took part in the Chindit operations in Burma in 1943

    In 1947, as part of India's independence, it was agreed that the Gurkha regiments would be split between the British and Indian armies—the British Army would take on four regiments (the 2nd, 6th, 7th and 10th), while the Indian Army would retain the rest.[8]

    While the 2nd Gurkhas became one of the four Gurkha regiments to transfer to the British Army, the regiment's 4th Battalion was transferred to the Indian Army as 5th Battalion, 8th Gurkha Rifles (Sirmoor Rifles) where it exists to this day. The first Indian commanding officer of this battalion, Lieutenant Colonel (later Brigadier) Nisi Kanta Chatterji, requested Army Headquarters, to let the battalion keep the title 'Sirmoor Rifles', which was accepted
    The regiment was awarded the following battle honours:

     

Share This Page