Disbanded or Transferred Regiments of the British Indian Army

Discussion in 'Military History' started by F-14B, Mar 4, 2017.

  1. F-14B

    F-14B #iamPUROHIT Senior Member

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    Indian Imperial Police

    The Indian Imperial Police, referred to variously as the Indian (Imperial) Police or simply the Indian Police or, by 1905,[1] Imperial Police (IP), was part of the Indian Police Services (IPS), the uniform system of police administration in British India, as established by India Act 5 of 1861.

    In 1948, a year after India's independence from Britain, the Imperial Police Service (IPS) was replaced by the Indian Police Service, which had been constituted as part of the All-India Services by the Constitution.[1]

    It comprised two branches, the Superior Police Services, from which the Indian (Imperial) Police would later be formed, and the Subordinate Police Service. Until 1893, appointments to the senior grades (i.e., Assistant District Superintendent and above) were made locally in India, mainly from European officers of the Indian Army.[2]

    Hierarchically, the upper échelon, headed by an Inspector General for each province, was made up of District Superintendents and Assistant District Superintendents (ADS), most of whom were appointed, from 1893, by examination for the Indian Civil Service (ICS) exams in the UK. The Subordinate Police Service consisted of Inspectors, Sub-Inspectors, Head Constables (or Sergeant in the City forces and cantonments) and Constables, mainly consisting of Indians except for the higher ranks.[2]

    By the 1930s, the Indian Police exercised "unprecedented degree of authority within the colonial administration"
     
  2. F-14B

    F-14B #iamPUROHIT Senior Member

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    crown's representative police force

    Originally constituted as the Crown Representative Police in 1939, it is one of the oldest Central para military forces (now termed as Central Armed Police Force). CRPF was raised as a sequel to the political unrest and the agitations in the then princely States of India following the Madras Resolution of the All-India Congress Committee in 1936 and the ever-growing desire of the Crown Representative to help the vast majority of the native States to preserve law and order as a part of the imperial policy.

    images (68).jpg
     
  3. F-14B

    F-14B #iamPUROHIT Senior Member

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    26th Jacob's Mountain Battery

    The 26th Jacob's Mountain Battery was an artillery unit of the British Indian Army. The battery traces its origins to Golandauze Battalion (1826). In 1843 it became the 10th Company Golandauze[1] Battalion of Bombay Foot Artillery, and became the 26th Jacob’s Mountain Battery in 1903. In 1947, it was transferred to the Pakistan Army, where it exists as the 1st Jacob’s Battery (Baloch) of The First (SP) Medium Regiment Artillery (Frontier Force).[2]

    battery was raised 1826 and renamed as the 10th Company Golandauze Battalion Bombay Foot Artillery in 1843. The Golandauze Battalion was the first native artillery unit of the Bombay Army. The gunners were dressed in blue uniforms with red facings. The manpower consisted of Muslims, Marathas and Purbeeas.[3] In 1846, the Golandauze Battalion was split into two, and the battery was re-designated as the 3rd Company 4th Battalion Bombay Foot Artillery. During the Great Indian Rebellion of 1857, the battery mutinied at Shikarpur and was disbanded. In 1862, it was re-raised and in 1864, it was re-designated as No. 2 Company Bombay Native Artillery. Meanwhile, in 1858, General John Jacob raised a unit of mountain artillery in Jacobabad, Sindh, called the Jacobabad Mountain Train for service on the Sindh frontier. The Jacobabad Mountain Train was manned by men of Jacob’s Rifles. In 1876, the guns of Jacobabad Mountain Train were taken over by No. 2 Company Bombay Native Artillery, which was re-designated as the No. 2 Bombay Mountain Battery.[4][5]

    The Jacob's Battery saw service on the Northwest Frontier of India and fought in the Second Afghan War of 1878–80. It also took part in the Lushai Expedition of 1889 and served in Burma from 1889 to 1893 where it took part in operations against the Shans and Kachins. In 1890, the battery was designated as No. 6 (Bombay) Mountain Battery, becoming Jullundur Mountain Battery in 1901 and 26th Jacob’s Mountain Battery in 1903.[4]

    During the First World War, the 26th Jacob’s Mountain Battery fought with great distinction at Gallipoli, Egypt, Mesopotamia and Persia. After the war, it again saw service on the Northwest Frontier. During the Second World War, it fought in the Burma Campaign as part of the 17th Indian Division. In 1944, it became an exclusively Punjabi Muslim unit. In 1947, it was transferred to the Pakistan Army, where it became the senior battery of 1st Mountain Regiment, Royal Pakistan Artillery. The battery fought in the Kashmir War of 1948.

    Battle honours

    Afghanistan 1878–80, Suez Canal, Egypt 1915–16, Mesopotamia 1916–18, Persia 1918, Anzac, Landing at Anzac, Defence of Anzac, Suvla, Sari Bair, Gallipoli 1915.[2][9]

     
  4. F-14B

    F-14B #iamPUROHIT Senior Member

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    The 108th Regiment of Foot (Madras Infantry)
    images (69).jpg
    was an infantry regiment of the British Indian Army from 1862 to 1881, when it was amalgamated into British Armies The Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers.

    The regiment was originally raised by the Honourable East India Company in 1854 as the 3rd Madras (European) Regiment, and served in the Indian Mutiny of 1857. As with all other "European" units of the Company, they were placed under the command of the Crown in 1858, and formally moved into the British Army in 1862, ranked as the 108th Foot.

    As part of the Childers Reforms in 1881, the regiment was amalgamated with the 27th (Inniskilling) Regiment of Foot to form the Second Battalion of The Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers.
     
  5. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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    Good thread @F-14B. I have slightly modified the title.

    Let's keep this thread as a compendium. For critiquing the British Indian Army, please open a new thread.
     
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  6. F-14B

    F-14B #iamPUROHIT Senior Member

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    1st Brahmans


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    The 1st Brahmans was an infantry regiment of the British Indian Army. It was raised at Oudh by Captain T Naylor in 1776 for service in the army of Nawab Wazir of Oudh, and was known as the Nawab Wazir's Regiment. It was transferred to the East India Company in 1777. In 1922, it was designated as the 4th Battalion 1st Punjab Regiment. The regiment was disbanded in 1931.
    The regiment was the senior-most among the twelve Bengal Native Infantry regiments that survived the Great Indian Rebellion of 1857-58. It was accordingly one of the small number of Bengal regular infantry regiments to retain the traditions of East India Company service in the new post-Mutiny army.[1] Renumbered as the 1st of the Bengal line, it subsequently saw active service in the Third Anglo-Burmese War of 1885-87. Following the Kitchener reforms of the Indian Army, when the names of the presidencies were dropped, the regiment became the 1st Brahman Infantry in 1901
    In 1914, the regimental centre of the 1st Brahmans was located at Allahabad and it was linked with the 3rd Brahmans. The regiment was recruited from United Provinces Brahmins, Garhwali Brahmins and some Punjabi Mussalmans. Full dress uniform of the sepoys included a high khaki turban with red fringe, a scarlet kurta (long coat) with white facings, white waist-sash, dark blue trousers and white leggings.
     
  7. F-14B

    F-14B #iamPUROHIT Senior Member

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    3rd Brahmans were an infantry regiment of the British Indian Army. They could trace their origins to 1798, when they were the 1st Battalion, 16th Bengal Native Infantry. Over the years they were known by a number of different names. The 32nd Bengal Native Infantry 1824–1861, the 3rd Regiment of Bengal Native Infantry 1861–1885, the 3rd Regiment of Bengal Infantry 1885–1901 and finally after the Kitchener reforms of the Indian Army when the names of the presidencies were dropped; the 3rd Brahmans. Before being disbanded in 1922, they had taken part in the Second Anglo-Afghan War and World War I.
    [​IMG]Wikipedia
    ACTIVE1798-1922
    COUNTRYIndian Empire
    BRANCHArmy
    TYPEInfantry
    PART OFBengal Army (to 1895), Bengal Command
    ENGAGEMENTS1825 - 26 Bhurtpore, 1879 - 80 Afghanistan
    COLONEL-IN-CHIEFKing Edward VII (1904)
     
  8. F-14B

    F-14B #iamPUROHIT Senior Member

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    The East Indian Railway Regiment was an auxiliary infantry regiment of the erstwhile British Indian Army. The unit was a local civilian volunteer corps and was a part of the Bengal command. The regiment was also administered by the Bengal Army. The army of Bengal Presidency served under the Presidency Armies in British India. The East Indian Railway Regiment was formed on 17th July 1869 as the East Indian Railway Volunteer Rifle Corps. The regiment included personnel from the East Indian Railway.

    The East Indian Railway Regiment absorbed the regiment of Sibpore College Volunteer Rifle Corps on 20th May 1892. Later on 1st April 1917, the battalion was re-designated as the 7th East Indian Railway Battalion. It was also merged with the St. Michael`s School Cadet Corps. The headquarters of the infantry unit was established in Jamalpore in the year 1901. The uniform of the troops included khaki drill formals. The motto of the East Indian Railway Regiment was "Strong without Rage". The auxiliary infantry unit was merged with the Oudh and Rohilkhand Railway Battalion in 1926.

    In 1940, the uniform was modified and included khaki formal dress with white facings. The military badge had crest of the East India Railway Company which was surmounted by a crown encircled by a laurel wreath. It included the words "East Indian Railway Regiment Auxillary Force". By the year 1940, the regiment had raised a second battalion which took part in several military campaigns under the British administration.

    Designations of East Indian Railway Regiment
    The East Indian Railway Regiment was designated a number of timed during its service under the British Indian Army. These are listed below-
    * East Indian Railway Volunteer Rifle Corps on 17th July 1869
    * 7th East Indian Railway Battalion on 1st April 1917
    * 7th East Indian Railway Corps on 8th November 1918
    * East Indian Railway Regiment on 1st October 1920

    In 1901:[3]

    • Headquarters - Jamalpore
    • Uniform - Khaki drill
    • Motto - "Strong without Rage."
    By 1940:[5]

    • Uniform - Khaki
    • Facings - White
    • Badge - Crest of the East India Railway Company surmounted by a crown which is encircled by a laurel wreath with the words "East Indian Railway Regiment Auxillary Force" and the motto.
    • 2 battalions
     
  9. F-14B

    F-14B #iamPUROHIT Senior Member

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  10. F-14B

    F-14B #iamPUROHIT Senior Member

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    the Commander-in-Chief, India (often "Commander-in-Chief in or of India") was the supreme commander of the British Indian Army. The Commander-in-Chief and most of his staff were based at General Headquarters, India, and liaised with the civilian Governor-General of India. Following the Partition of India in 1947 and the creation of the independent dominions of India and Pakistan, the post was abolished. It was briefly replaced by the position of Supreme Commander of India and Pakistan before the role was abolished in November 1948.[1] Subsequently, the role of Commander-in-Chief was merged into the offices of the Governors-General of India and Pakistan, respectively, before becoming part of the office of President of India from 1950, and of the President of Pakistan from 1956.

    Prior to independence, the official residence was the Flagstaff House, which later became the residence of the first Prime Minister of India; as Teen Murti House, it is now a museum.
     
  11. F-14B

    F-14B #iamPUROHIT Senior Member

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    Northern command British indian army

    The Presidency armies were abolished with effect from 1 April 1895 when the three Presidency armies became the Indian Army.[2] The Indian Army was divided into four Commands (Bengal Command, Bombay Command, Madras Command and Punjab Command) each under a lieutenant general.[2]

    In 1908, the four commands were merged into two Armies (Northern Army and Southern Army): this system persisted until 1920 when the arrangement reverted to four commands again (Eastern Command, Northern Command, Southern Command and Western Command).[2] Northern Command was re-formed again as North Western Army in April 1942 to guard the North West Frontier. It controlled the Kohat, Peshawar, Rawalpindi, Baluchistan and Waziristan Districts.[3] The former Western Command, was absorbed by the new North Western Army at that time.[4] The formation reverted to the title Northern Command in November 1945.[5] In 1947 Headquarters Northern Command became the new headquarters of the Pakistan Army. General Sir Frank Messervy C in C pakistan army


     
  12. F-14B

    F-14B #iamPUROHIT Senior Member

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    Southern command

    Southern Command, with headquarters
    at Poona, coincides roughly with Central India and Central Provinces, Fhansi, Bundelkhand and Baghelkhand, the Bombay and Madras Presidencies.
    In August 1947, Southern Command had the Deccan, Madras and Bombay Areas (with HQs at Kamptee, Madras and Bombay). In 1947–48, Southern Command was largely responsible in getting Junagadh and Hyderabad to sign the instrument of accession to India.[2]1st Armoured Division did the actual incursion into Hyderabad. In 1961, the Indian annexation of Goa was conducted by 17th Infantry Division and 50th Parachute Brigade, under the operational control of Southern Command
     
  13. Bornubus

    Bornubus Chodi Bhakt & BJPig Hunter Senior Member

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    They screwed Hyder Ali and Tipu


    0bbee13ef2dc7741a651ad6f577e77a8.jpg
     
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  14. F-14B

    F-14B #iamPUROHIT Senior Member

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    @Bornubus the 20th later became the
    80th Carnatic Infantry
    images (74).jpg

    The 80th Carnatic Infantry were an infantry regiment of the British Indian Army. They could trace their origins to 1777, when they were raised as the 21st Carnatic Battalion, by enlisting men from the 2nd, the 6th, the 12th and the 15th Carnatic Battalions.

    The regiment's first action was during the Battle of Sholinghur in the Second Anglo-Mysore War. They also took part in the campaigns for the Third Anglo-Mysore War and were present at the Battle of Seringapatam in the Fourth Anglo-Mysore War in 1798. It was over 100 years before they were next called for active service during World War I. During World War I they served in the Mesopotamia Campaign and a second battalion the 2/80th was formed in the Southern Brigade of the 9th (Secunderabad) Division in October 1918, and transferred to the Secunderabad Bde in December 1918.

    After World War I the Indian government reformed the army moving from single battalion regiments to multi battalion regiments.[1] In 1922, the 80th Carnatic Infantry was disbanded, being one of the remaining nine single battalion regiments

    Principal Campaigns and Battles
    Carnatic
    Sholinghur
    Mysore
    Seringapatam
     
  15. F-14B

    F-14B #iamPUROHIT Senior Member

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    Badge


    After the Mutiny there were several 42nd regiments, the first being the Agra which lasted from May to October 1861, and the second, the 1st Assam Light Infantry who became the 42nd in October 1861, and continued as such until they became the 1/6th Gurkha Rifles. But in 1903 there was a third 42nd based on the old Deoli Irregular Force which had been raised in 1857 as the Meena Battalion under Capt. J D McDonald. This battalion was the nucleus for the infantry of the Deoli Irregular Force which in May 1861, numbered 8 companies. Cavalry was also added by 1865.

    They raised a second battalion in1917 but as a whole failed to reach the amalgamations of 1922, all being disbanded on 10th December 1921.
     
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  16. F-14B

    F-14B #iamPUROHIT Senior Member

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    Madras Rifle Corps,
    images (75).jpg

    The Madras Rifle Corps, originally known as Madras Volunteer Battalion, was one of the most prominent light infantry battalions, which was raised by the Honourable British East India Company. The military unit remained in service from the year 1810 to 1869. It was a part of the army of Madras Presidency, before the starting of the Indian Rebellion in 1857. The Madras Army was one of the 3 major Presidency Armies in British India. The Madras Presidency Army was created with the objective of defending the commercial interests of the East India Company. The military forces of the British Presidencies operated under the British East India Company until the Sepoy Mutiny of 1857. The Government of India Act 1858, which was authorized after the Sepoy Mutiny in the year 1857, reassigned the authority of the 3 Presidency Armies to the British Empire in India from the British East India Company.

    History of Madras Rifle Corps
    The Madras Rifle Corps battalion was formed as the Madras Volunteer Battalion on 10 February 1810 in the Madras Presidency of the HEIC. Captain W. Munro was appointed as the Commanding Officer of the battalion. He previously served in the 15th Regiment of Madras Native Infantry. At the time of its formation, the army unit included both European and native Indian army personnel.

    The authorized strength of the Madras Rifle Corps battalion at the time of its inception is mentioned below-

    Europeans Army Personnel in Madras Volunteer Battalion
    * 1 Captain Commanding Officer
    * 3 Captains
    * 10 Lieutenants
    * 5 Ensigns
    * 1 Adjutant
    * 1 Surgeon
    * 1 Assistant Surgeon
    * 1 Sergeant Major
    * 1 Quartermaster Sergeant

    Native Army Personnel in Madras Volunteer Battalion
    * 10 Subedars
    * 10 Jemadars
    * 50 Havildars
    * 50 Naiks
    * 900 Sepoys
    * 20 Drummers and Fifers
    * 12 Puckallies
     
  17. F-14B

    F-14B #iamPUROHIT Senior Member

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    The 4th Bengal European Cavalry was a cavalry regiment of the British East India Company, created in 1858 and disbanded in 1859.[1]

    • The regiment was originally raised in Bengal by the East India Company in 1858 as the 4th Bengal European Light Cavalry, for service in the Indian Mutiny; the "European" in the name indicated that it was manned by white soldiers, not Indian sowars.
     
  18. F-14B

    F-14B #iamPUROHIT Senior Member

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    The Peshawar Light Horse, was raised on 3rd June 1857, and was formed of men from the 27th, 70th, and 87th Foot, mounted on horses taken away from the disarmed native cavalry. Captain F. Fane, 87th Foot, was commandant, and the strength was 2 officers, 4 sergeants and 84 men
     
  19. F-14B

    F-14B #iamPUROHIT Senior Member

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    16th Rajputs (Lucknow regiment )

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    The famous Bailey Guard Paltan was formed in Cawnpore in 1857 from the loyal Brahmins and Rajputs of the 13th, and the Sikhs of the 48th and 71st Bengal Native Infantry. The badge of the 16th is the turreted gateway surmounted by the number 16. This represents the Bailey Gate in the Lucknow Residency, better known in the regiment as Aitken's Post after the officer of that name who commanded the 13th.

    The reformed regiment was designated The Regiment of Lucknow and received the number 16 in 1861. Since then, they have taken part in five major campaigns:

    Duffla Hill Expedition - 1874-75
    Afghanistan - 1880
    Upper and Lower Burma - 1886 and 1887
    Malakand - 1897
    Campaign against the Bunerwals - 1898

    In 1900 the regiment was based at Agra and the majority of recruits were drawn from farming Rajputs of the Bundelkhund district. It was a class regiment, by which is meant that all the Indians in the regiment, all eight companies, were of the same ethnic group or type ie. Rajputs. In 1914 they were based at Fort William. Their WW1 service was in India and Persia.

    In 1922 they became the 10th or training battalion of the 7th Rajput Regiment based at Fatehgarh.
     
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  20. F-14B

    F-14B #iamPUROHIT Senior Member

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    QVOCOG UNIFORM

    I simply love this unifourm
     

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