Disbanded or Transferred Regiments of the British Indian Army

Discussion in 'Military History' started by F-14B, Mar 4, 2017.

  1. F-14B

    F-14B #iamPUROHIT Senior Member

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    Dear members

    I am starting this thread in order to remember those regiments of the Indian Army that were lost due to the partition or the general down sizeing of the army that followed india's independence i dedicate this thread to those regiments who's last post was sung a long time back
     
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  3. F-14B

    F-14B #iamPUROHIT Senior Member

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    Assam Valley Light Horse
    images (45).jpg

    Imagine courtesy of salesroom.com

    Role :-light horse
    Force:-Indian Volunteer Force, Indian Defence Force Auxiliary Force (India).
    In existance - 1891 to 1947 ( 67 years)
    Motto Samper peratus ( always ready)
    Reson for disbandedment indian independence

    The Assam Valley Light Horse regiment was raised in 1891 and formed part of Indian Volunteer Force, later the Indian Defence Force and finally the Auxiliary Force (India).

    The regimental headquarters was at Dibrugarh in Assam. It was recruited from the European community in Assam - mostly tea planters.

    A light horse regiment had a rough strength of approximately 400 men and its troops typically fought as mounted infantry rather than traditional cavalry.

    A few volunteers from the regiment joined Lumsden's Horse in 1899 for service in the Boer War and similarly in 1911 a few volunteers took part in the Abor campaign of 1911-12.

    It was not mobilized as a unit during World War I or World War II but individuals did serve, mainly with the British Indian Army.

    The regiment was disbanded when India became independent in August 1947
     
  4. Horushmar.

    Horushmar. Regular Member

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    Very good thread, would like to contribute the Lushai Scouts from Mizoram (though not exactly a regiment they deserve a mention)

    "Lt Col Jack (John) Longbottom MC and the Lushai Scouts

    At the outbreak of WW2 Jack was recalled to the Army with the Coldstream Guards in a training role with the rank of sergeant. After Dunkirk he decided that he would rather be in a fighting unit, so was commissioned from Sandhurst in 1940 and joined the West Yorkshire Regiment.

    Jack was involved in the First Burma Campaign in 1942 where he was Adjutant to Brig. P C Marindin, later to be Commander Lushai Brigade. The citation in 1944 for Jack’s Military Cross reads — ‘ During the retreat from Burma this Officer was my Adjt., he deserved the MC on several occasions and his work throughout was invaluable and of the very highest order.’

    The following details of the exploits of the Lushai Scouts are taken in part from an article written by the then Major Jack Longbottom which appeared in ‘Ça Ira’, the Regimental magazine of the West Yorkshire Regiment, published in December 1947, repeated here by kind permission of Major (Ret’d) Nick Allbeury MBE, Regimental HQ, Prince of Wales’s Own Regiment of Yorkshire, York.

    During March 1944 Jack was given the task of raising and training a new guerrilla unit which came to be known as the Lushai Scouts. As there were so few Officers he had to undertake this task single-handed, travelling into the Lushai Hills to raise 400 troops. By this stage in the War the Japanese had pushed beyond Tiddim in the Chin Hills, with heavy fighting in the Kohima and Imphal areas. The Lushai Hills lay to the rear of the Japanese and to the west of the Chin Hills. This remote area required specialist troops and Brig. Marindin, Commander ‘V’ force, had been very firm in his orders. He said that although the Lushai Scouts would be used as guerrillas in the rear of the enemy they had to be raised and trained as regular troops. Their speciality was to be jungle warfare with special emphasis on mobility and minimum transport.

    Jack travelled for ten days by train, sampan and foot to reach Aijal, capital of the Lushai Hills. Mules carrying army clothing, weapons and attestation papers accompanied him. On arrival in Aijal he was to find a platoon already being given primary training by the instructors from the Assam Rifles. Jack went on to Biate on the Chin Hill frontier where the new recruits were to follow a month later.

    There was reluctance from GHQ Delhi to sanction the raising of the unit and although recruiting began in March 1944, it was not until some months later that the formation of the unit was finally agreed. Brig. Marindin suggested the Lushai Scouts were called “Slim’s Own” as it looked likely that Gen. Slim would have to pay them!

    The Lushais were 18 to 20 years old and very keen to be trained to fight. Having been born and bred in the jungle they were completely at ease moving around in it. The young men were immensely proud of their unit and Jack helped to instil a feeling of confidence in their leaders and in each other, but also most importantly, themselves.

    In May 1944 the Lushai Scouts began doing some patrol exercises in the Chin Hills and were fortunate to be able to train in the location where they were intended to fight. In August 1944 one Company had to go up to Kaptel in the Chin Hills - a march of 80 miles under monsoon conditions. They came to an abrupt stop at the Tui River which was in full spate and unfordable as the suspension bridge had been washed away. Having cut timber and bamboo and rebuilt the bridge, the Scouts managed to reach Kaptel on schedule.

    Early September found the Scouts over the other side of the Manipur River. They were now about 120 strong with a column of 50 Chins as transport — no mules and no motor transport! They did several small successful raids on the main Tiddim Road behind the Japanese main force. The next main attack came on the night of 7-8 September 1944 when a column of Scouts marched 15 miles trough the jungle to come up between two Japanese Companies with artillery and a platoon outpost on a hill feature covering Tiddim itself. At dawn the outpost was attacked and the surprise was so great that the Scouts received no casualties. The Scouts then blended back into the jungle from whence they came.

    The Japanese were understandably rather peeved by all these guerrilla tactics and put a strong platoon in position at Saizang. Two Lushai troops who could speak Chin dressed in Chin clothing and went down into Saizang selling vegetables. They came back with immensely accurate information on the position of the platoon and its sentries. After the position was taken, the Scouts again only had 4 wounded and were in high spirits.

    The large hill Kum Vum dominated the country from Tiddim to Kennedy Peak. The hill had previously been occupied by the Ghurkas who had made it a really strong strategic point. Commander Lushai Brigade ordered Jack and the Scouts to take the hill, as it would be an important one if Tiddim fell. It was impossible to approach unseen and, although the Scouts knew the hill as they had patrolled there previously, the idea of taking the hill without the element of surprise was a difficult one. Time was of the utmost importance, as the Japanese would be strengthening their position all the time. It was decided to try the hit and run type of raids, which were small but constant, together with an Air Strike. Until the Medical Officer arrived it was necessary to evaluate the cost of an attack on Kum Vum in the terms of the wounded. If there were too many for Jack to treat, the necessary evacuation and escort would seriously deplete the Force.

    The Free Chin Resistance Movement was approached to help to make a big show of force to the Japanese. The Chins were told to approach Kum Vum from the West and were expecting to be joined by the main force of the Scouts approaching from the North 15 minutes later for the final assault. As the Scouts reached the top of the hill all they could see was hundreds of rounds of tracer and grenade explosions in the air. It looked like a firework display! The Scouts managed to fire the odd 2-inch mortar into the nearest position but could not engage small arms fire on an unseen enemy! The firing from the Chins became more sporadic and finally one platoon made a dash for the Japanese position, successfully over running it. The rest of the Japanese had had enough by now and decided to make a run for it. Before the Scouts could open fire the Chins were up and chasing the enemy. The last that was seen of the Japanese was them disappearing into the jungle closely pursued by the Chins who had no ammunition left but did a good line in blood curdling cries!!

    After the arrival of the 5th Indian Division the Scouts were dispatched to Falam where they were to join up with the Lushai Brigade. They were within half a day’s march of Falam when Jack decided to give the Scouts a days rest. Battledress was cleaned, equipment was polished and every man had a haircut. Jack’s Coldstream Guards training shone out like a beacon as he marched the Lushai Scouts proudly into Falam! Here they were joined by 100 reinforcements so the Scouts now numbered 300. It became apparent that the Japanese were beginning to know where the Scouts were operating, probably because of their airdrops. It was decided therefore to take enough ammunition and supplies for 14 days on the next sortie. This was a particular successful ploy and resulted in many surprise attacks.

    One amusing anecdote occurred early in 1945. A platoon was ordered to escort a party of American troops to Mount Victoria 150 miles away through thick jungle full of Japanese soldiers. The platoon was under the command of a Subedar who could speak little English. Apparently they managed to find about eleven different enemy parties in the area, cut off from the main force and in hiding. The Subedar said they had had a thoroughly exciting and enjoyable trip! Two months later a letter was received from the Commander of the American forces in South-East Asia telling them how “the Scouts had resisted all Japanese attempts to prevent the ‘valuable beam’ set reaching Mount Victoria”!!

    Towards the end of the War the Scouts were given 600 Chin Levies together with 27 elephants and 100 hill ponies. Jack felt more and more like Hannibal! When the War ended the Lushai Scouts were flown back to India and disbanded at Shillong as a Unit. They had fought 51 separate actions behind the enemy lines and due to their special skills in jungle warfare, their casualties amounted to one British Officer and two other ranks killed and 23 wounded.

    At the disbandment parade in Shillong a message was read out from Gen. Slim — a copy of that message together with photographs of Gen. Slim and Brig. Marindin cut from ‘S.E.A.C.’, the 14th Army’s newspaper, were in place of honour on the walls of almost every house in the Lushai Hills. Most of the Scouts returned home to tend their fields and live the quiet life, reflecting on the “fun” they had in Burma!

    The following words come from a certificate presented to Major J Longbottom MC on 23rd September 1945 and signed by Lalkhama Chief of Darzo for the Lushai Chiefs and the Lushai People: “ As a mark of appreciation of the services you have rendered to our Country by successfully Superintending the Lushai Scouts Organised by the Government to ward off the Japanese invasion which results in our country having won a good reputation on behalf of the Lushai Chiefs and the Lushai people as a whole. I am presenting you our national garment (Puanchei) and bag (Iptechei) which I hope you will please accept.”

    Written by Jane Robinson — Jack Longbottom’s daughter. On 13th November 2005 Jack celebrated his 95th birthday in Bassingham Nursing Home, Bassingham, Lincoln."

    source:http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/ww2peopleswar/stories/30/a7106230.shtml
     
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  5. F-14B

    F-14B #iamPUROHIT Senior Member

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    Bihar Light Horse
    download (1).jpg

    Active 8 December 1862 – 14 August 1947
    Country United Kingdom, Indian Empire
    Branch Volunteer Corps, Auxiliary Force
    Type Cavalry
    Garrison/HQ Muzaffarpur
    Motto(s) Nec Aspera Terrent
    Colors Dark Blue

    When the 1857 Mutiny broke out in India, Fred Collingridge of the Doudpur factory proposed the formation of a defence force for the British residents of Muzaffarpur. 53 Englishmen under the command of Minden James Wilson chose the civil surgeon, Dr. A. Simpson's bungalow for a defence post, calling it "Fort Pill Box" in his honour. In 1862, Collingridge and C. T. Metcalfe, a Joint Magistrate, submitted an application for the raising of a Mounted Volunteer Corps to the Commissioner of the Behar division. Sanction was obtained and on 8 December 1862, the Soubah Behar Mounted Rifles Volunteer Corps was formed. The first commandant was Major James Furlong.

    The regiment was renamed the Bihar Light Horse Volunteer Corps on 29 February 1884. Its motto, adopted on 1 April 1917, "Nec Aspera Terrent" (They are not frightened of hardships). It ceased to exist as a Volunteer Corps, becoming the Bihar Light Horse Auxiliary Force, in October 1920.

    54 officers and men of the regiment were granted leave in 1900 to travel to South Africa to fight the Boers. For bravery in battle, Captain J. B. Rutherford was awarded the Distinguished Service Order. Sergeant Major C. M. C. Marsham and Corporal Percy Jones received the Distinguished Conduct Medal.


     
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  6. F-14B

    F-14B #iamPUROHIT Senior Member

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    Calcutta Scottish
    images (47).jpg


    Active 1914–1947

    Country British India

    Allegiance United Kingdom

    Branch Auxiliary Force

    Type Infantry Regiment

    Headquarters Calcutta

    Motto(s) Per Ardua Stabilis Esto
    ("Be firm through difficulties")

    Engagements

    World War I
    World War II

    Tartan


    Stewart Hunting

    The Calcutta Scottish was a regiment of volunteers of Scottish descent raised in 1914 as an infantry regiment of the British Indian Army. The regiment formed part of the army reserves of the Auxiliary Force, India (AFI). The regimental dress uniform was Hunting Stewart tartan. The regiment was disbanded following India's independence in 1947.
    Formation
    An attempt was made to raise two kilted companies of "Calcutta Scottish" within the Calcutta Rifles, but apparently without success. This may account for the date for the raising of the Regiment being given as 1 August 1911 in Major Donovan Jackson’s work India’s Army. On 1 August 1914, The Calcutta Scottish Volunteers were formed as part of the Indian Volunteer Force. King's and Regimental Colours were awarded.
     
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  7. Horushmar.

    Horushmar. Regular Member

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    this is a good thread, it needs more attention.:)
     
  8. F-14B

    F-14B #iamPUROHIT Senior Member

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  9. F-14B

    F-14B #iamPUROHIT Senior Member

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    Nilgiri Malabar Battalion
    Nilgiri_Malabar_Battalion_Badge_engraving_on_a_spoon.jpg


    Active 1878–1947

    Country British India

    Allegiance United Kingdom

    Branch Auxiliary Force (India)

    Type Rifle Battalion

    Size ~ 300 men

    Headquarters Ootacamund

    Engagements Moplah Rebellion



    The Nilgiri Malabar Battalion (NMB) was an Auxiliary Force (India) (AFI) of the British Colonial Auxiliary Forces of the British Indian Army, composed of Eurasians/Anglo-Indians. Enrollment in the Auxiliary Force was open to all European British subjects and to persons of European descent.[1] After the Mutiny of 1857, a Volunteer Force was created, whose primary function was to protect British families in India. The Volunteer Force units were later absorbed into the Auxiliary Force India (AFI), which was created in 1920 for internal security duties.Its terms of service were similar to the Territorial Army of the UK. The AFI, which provided officers to the Army during World War II, was disbanded in 1947
    The Volunteer Force in India came into organized existence in 1860.[13] Besides the regular European and Native military forces, the Europeans and Eurasians of civil life formed volunteer regiments.[14] The Nilgiri Malabar Battalion began life as the Nilgiri Volunteer Rifles in October 1878. In 1892 it incorporated the Coimbatore Volunteer Corps (formed August 1885)
    In 1885 the European and Eurasian inhabitants of Calicut organised themselves into two companies of Volunteer Rifles. These companies and others located at Tellicherry, Wayanad and Cochin, with a section at Palghat and numbering altogether about 300 men, were amalgamated into the “Malabar Volunteer Rifles” under a Major Commandant with headquarters at Calicut.[16] With Calicut as its headquarters, the regiment recruited mainly from the populous Eurasian community, and has detachments at Cannanore, Tellicherry and Cochin.[17] The Malabar Volunteer Rifles was formed on 14 August 1885, from the Calicut and Tellicherry Volunteer Corps and was amalgamated as the 29th Nilgiri Malabar Battalion on 1 April 1917.[18] The badge was a stag's head inside a garter inscribed 'Auxiliary Force India'. A crown was above, the wreath was coconut palm and the scroll below read 'Nilgiri Malabar Battalion'.[15] The battalion uniform was khaki and their HQ base was at Ootacamund the headquarters of the Nilgris district

    The Moplah Rebellion, which remained confined to Ernad, Walluvanad and Ponnani taluks of South Malabar, began in August 1921.[20] Following an incident in Pookhottur village a major rebellion broke out with the government deploying the army to take control of the civil administration.[21] Between August and November there were two major battles between the Moplahs and the armed forces.[20] By the end of December 1921, the Moplah Rebellion was completely suppressed.[21] Four officers along with hundred and eighty four men of The Nilgiri Malabar Battalion were part of the armed forces unit that quelled the Moplah Rebellion of 1921.[22] Members of the Cannanore and Tellicherry detachments of the Nilgiri Malabar Battalion took part in a combined Naval and Military exercise in December 1924 at Cannanore.[23]Lord Goshen, Governor of Madras Presidency (1924-29), inspected the annual camp of exercise of the Nilgiri Malabar Battalion at Podanur in 1925.[24] During the Second World War members of the Auxiliary Force (India) continued to function as part-time soldiers while contributing to the war effort by carrying on their normal occupation.[25] The Nilgiri Malabar Battalion was disbanded together with all Auxiliary Force regiments following partition and India's independence in 1947
     
  10. F-14B

    F-14B #iamPUROHIT Senior Member

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    No. 1 (Calcutta) Fortress Company, RE



    No. 1 (Calcutta) Fortress Company, Bengal Army
    The No. 1 (Calcutta) Fortress Company was one of the former British Indian Engineer companies. It was included as a part of the Volunteer Corps of British Indian Army. The No. 1 (Calcutta) Fortress Company served under the administrative control of the Bengal Army which was one of the Presidency Armies in British India. It was also a part of the Bengal Command. The auxiliary army regiment was headquartered in Calcutta (now Kolkata in the state of West Bengal).

    The company was formed on the 1st April 1902 from the troops of the Calcutta Port Defence Volunteers unit. Later in the year 1917, it was re-designated as the No. 1 Electrical Engineer Company. The British Indian army unit was renamed again as the No. 1 (Calcutta) Field Company on 1st October 1920. Eventually on the 1st April 1933, the battalion was titled as the No. 1 (Calcutta) Fortress Company.
     
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  11. Krusty

    Krusty Senior Member Senior Member

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    Interesting, I think there should be a 'like' option for threads..
     
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  12. F-14B

    F-14B #iamPUROHIT Senior Member

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    Punjab Light Horse
    unnamed (2).jpg

    Raised :12th May 1893

    • Uniform - Blue



    The British Indian auxiliary cavalry regiment of the Punjab Light Horse was one of the most prominent units of the British Cavalry Reserve. With
    headquarters at Lahore and detachments at


    The battalion was formed by the Honourable British East India Company in the year 1867. Later in 1903, all the army regiments under the administration of the East India Company and the Presidency Armies in British India were joined to form the United British Indian Army. The headquarters of the regiment was established at Lahore in British Punjab.

    The Punjab Light Horse unit was almost equal in military strength to a battalion and functioned as a mounted infantry regiment rather than conventional cavalry unit. It consisted of almost four hundred army men.

    After the national freedom was attained from the supremacy of the British Empire in India, the country was divided into 2 geographical and political regions. Consequently, the Union of India and the Dominion of Pakistan was formed. Lahore was assigned to Pakistan during the Partition of India. The British Indian Army was also shared among the modern Indian Army and the army of Pakistan. The Punjab Light Horse unit was dissolved in the year 1947.
     
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  13. F-14B

    F-14B #iamPUROHIT Senior Member

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    United Provinces Horse (Southern Regiment)
    unnamed (3).jpg


    The Allahabad Volunteer Rifle Corps became the Allahabad Troop Light Horse on the 12th September 1884 and later became the Allahabad Light Horse in 1890. The Cawnpore Light Horse, formed from the Cawnpore Volunteer Rifle Corps on the 5th February 1886; the Gorakhpur Light Horse, formed on 20th May 1887; the Ghazipur Light Horse, formed on 7th January 1887 from the Ghazipur Volunteer Rifle Corps and the Oudh Light Horse formed on 10th June 1887 from the Oudh Volunteer Rifle Corps, were all amalgamated and became the United Provinces Light Horse on the 1st April 1904. On 1st April 1909 the unit designation changed to 1st United Provinces Horse and then 7th (Southern Regiment) United Provinces Horse on 1st April 1917. Unit became the United Provinces Horse (Southern Regiment) on 1st October 1920.
     
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  14. F-14B

    F-14B #iamPUROHIT Senior Member

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    Northern Bengal Mounted Rifles

    unnamed (4).jpg

    • Uniform - Scarlet
    • Facings White
    • Badge - Bengal Tiger
    • Motto - "Fideliter"

    Northern Bengal Volunteer Rifle Corps, Bengal Army
    Northern Bengal Volunteer Rifle Corps, also known as Northern Bengal Mounted Rifles, was a former British Indian Infantry unit that functioned under the Volunteer Corps of the British Indian Army. The auxiliary regiment was a part of the Bengal Army of Bengal Presidency as well as the Bengal Command. The regiment was raised on 6th August 1873 by the British Empire in India. Later on 5th August 1881, the regiment was merged with the Darjeeling Volunteer Rifle Corps.

    It was later re-structured and re-designated as the Northern Bengal Mounted Rifles on 15th February 1889. The uniform of Northern Bengal Volunteer Rifle Corps was a scarlet dress with white facings. The military badge included the image of a Bengal Tiger. The headquarters was established at Darjeeling. The armed force comprised of six companies that were stationed in Purnea, Alipur Duars, Nagrakot, Dam Dim, Jalpaiguri and Kurseong. It also had
    3 companies of cadets, and one reserve company. Its total strength (1903-4) is 510 in all ranks"
    “...all the British tea planters were members of the North Bengal Mounted Rifles....We were issued rifles and received an allowance to cover the expenses of maintaining a horse”
     
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  15. F-14B

    F-14B #iamPUROHIT Senior Member

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    Calcutta and Presidency Battalion

    images (50).jpg
    Calcutta Battalion
    • 1863 raised as the Calcutta Volunteer Rifle Corps on the 3rd February[1]
    • 1898 reconstituted 1st Battalion, Calcutta Volunteer Rifles, 24th March[2]
    • 1917 became 5th Calcutta Battalion, 1st April[2]
    • 1920 became the Calcutta Battalion, 1st October[2]
    • 1926 amalgamated with the Presidency Battalion to become the Calcutta and Presidency Battalion, 23rd July[2]
    Presidency Battalion
    • 1888 raised as the Presidency Volunteer Reserve Battalion, 30th March[2]
    • 1891 became the Presidency Volunteer Rifle Battalion
    • 1898 became Presidency Battalion, Calcutta Rifle Volunteers, 24th March[2][1]
    • 1901 redesignated 2nd (Presidency) Battalion, Calcutta Volunteer Rifles by GGO No.868 of 1901[1]
    • 1917 became 37th Calcutta Presidency Battalion[2]
    • 1920 became the Calcutta Presidency Battalion, 1st October
    • 1926 amalgamated with the Calcutta Battalion to become the Calcutta and Presidency Battalion, 23rd July
    Cadet Battalion
    • 1863 raised as the cadet battalion of the Calcutta Volunteer Rifle Corps on the 3rd February[1]
    • 1901 redesignated 3rd (Cadet) Battalion, Calcutta Volunteer Rifles by GGO No.868 of 1901[
    Headquarters - Calcutta, for all three battalions

    Uniform
    In 1901:[1]

    • 1st Battalion - Khaki
    • 2nd and 3rd Battalions - Khaki drill
    By 1940:[2]

    • Uniform - Khaki
    • Facings - White
    • Badge - Arms of Calcutta surmounted on crossed rifles
    • Motto - Per Ardua Stabilis Esto

     
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  16. F-14B

    F-14B #iamPUROHIT Senior Member

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    United Provinces Horse (Northern Regiment)


    The United Provinces Horse (Northern Regiment) was one of the Auxiliary Cavalry Regiments of the British Indian Army. It operated under the British Indian Volunteer Corps. It was formed as the United Provinces 2nd (Northern) Regiment in 1909. The regiment was raised by the merger of the Dehra Dun Mounted Rifles (Dehradun Mounted Rifles) and the Mounted Troop of the Naini Tal Volunteer Rifles (Nainital Volunteer Rifles).

    The troops of the military unit took part in a number of British campaigns. The United Provinces Horse (Northern Regiment) was designated as the 8th (Northern Regiment) United Provinces Horse in 1917. Later in 1920, the auxiliary unit was renamed as the United Provinces Horse (Northern Regiment).
     
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  17. F-14B

    F-14B #iamPUROHIT Senior Member

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    1st Punjab Regiment
    Badge_of_1st_Punjab_Regiment_1945-56.jpg

    The 1st Punjab Regiment was a regiment of the British Indian Army from 1922 to 1947. It was transferred to the Pakistan Army on independence in 1947, and amalgamated with the 14th, 15th and 16th Punjab Regiments in 1956, to form the Punjab Regiment.
    The 1st Punjab Regiment had its antecedents in the old Madras Army of the British East India Company, which was largely responsible for the establishment of British rule in south and central India. Its senior battalion was raised as the 3rd Battalion of Coast Sepoys in 1759, making it the senior-most surviving infantry battalion of the British Indian Army. The 2nd Battalion was raised in 1761 as the 7th Battalion of Coast Sepoys, while the 3rd Battalion was raised in 1776 as the 16th Carnatic Battalion. This was followed by the 5th Battalion in 1788 as 29th Madras Battalion and the 10th Battalion in 1794 as 34th Madras Battalion. These battalions underwent several changes in nomenclature until 1824, when they were designated as the 2nd, 6th, 16th, 22nd and 24th Regiments of Madras Native Infantry. Their men were mostly enlisted from South India and consisted of Muslims and Hindus. The 4th Battalion was an oddity as being a survivor of the Bengal Army, most of whose units were disbanded following the Indian Mutiny of 1857-58. It was raised in 1776 as the 30th Battalion of Bengal Sepoys. In 1861, it was designated as the 1st Regiment of Bengal Native Infantry. It mostly recruited Hindu Brahmans from Oudh.[1
    All the battalions of the regiment played an important role in the early military campaigns of the East India Company and were actively engaged in the wars against the French, Mysore and the Marathas. Their first major engagement was the decisive Battle of Wandiwash in 1860, which ended French colonial ambitions in India. This was followed by forty years of constant warfare against the Sultans of Mysore, and then the Marathas chieftains. In the Second Maratha War of 1803-05, the 1st and 10th Battalions fought in the Battle of Assaye under General Arthur Wellesley, the future Duke of Wellington, while the 4th Battalion fought in the Battles of Laswari and Agra in 1803, and Bhurtpore in 1805. The performance of the 1st and 10th at Assaye was much appreciated and they were permitted the word "Assaye" with the device of an elephant on their colours and appointments. The two battalions were again engaged against the Marathas during the Third Maratha War of 1817-19, which decisively broke the Maratha power in India.[1]

    The regiment also made overeas forays, when the 2nd and 10th Battalions took part in the expeditions to Bourbon Island and Mauritius in the Indian Ocean in 1810, and the 3rd and 5th served in the First Anglo-Burmese War of 1824-26. In 1840, the 1st and 2nd Battalions took part in the First Anglo-Chinese War. Their performance was much appreciated and as a reward, they were the only two battalions of the Indian Army authorized to bear a golden dragon wearing the imperial crown upon their regimental colours along with the battle honour of "China". In the latter part of the 19th century, the regiment did not see much action, although all of its battalions served in Burma
    After the conquest of Sindh and the Punjab in the 1840s, British focus shifted towards the northwest and the Madras Army was largely reduced to garrison duties. This greatly affected its morale and efficiency. By the turn of the century, the reputation of Madrassi units had suffered considerably and they were either disbanded or reconstituted with northerners. Among the latter were the five battalions, which would go on to form the 1st Punjab Regiment in 1922. In 1902, the South Indians were mustered out and replaced with Punjabi Muslims, Sikhs and Rajputs in the 1st, 2nd and 10th Battalions. Next year, the 3rd and 5th Battalions were also reconstituted with Punjabi Muslims, Sikhs and Hindu Jats. Under the Kitchener Reforms of 1903, these battalions were redesignated as the 62nd, 66th, 76th, 82nd and 84th Punjabis; thus severing almost a hundred and fifty years of association with Madras. Meanwhile, the 1st Bengal Infantry was redesignated as the 1st Brahmans.
    During the First World War, except for the 1st Brahmans, all battalions of the regiment served in the Mesopotamian Campaign, while the 62nd and 76th Punjabis also served at Suez Canal during the Turkish offensive of 1915. Captain Claude Auchinleck, later Field Marshal and the last Commander-in-Chief of the British Indian Army, served with the 62nd Punjabis in Egypt and Mesopotamia.
    Battalions



      • 1st (Territorial) Battalion 62nd Punjabis - 11th (Territorial) Battalion 1st Punjab Regiment
    Engagements
    Battle of Wandiwash 1760
    Siege of Madura 1763
    First Mysore War 1767-69
    Pondicherry 1778
    Second Mysore War 1780-84
    Third Mysore War 1789-92
    Fourth Mysore War 1798-99
    Second Mahratta War 1803-06
    Travancore War 1809
    Bourbon Island 1810
    Mauritius 1810
    Anglo–Nepalese War 1814-16
    Third Mahratta War 1817-19
    First Burma War 1824-26
    Bhurtpore 1826
    Coorg War 1834
    First Afghan War 1839
    First Anglo-Chinese War 1839-42
    Indian Mutiny 1857-58
    Second Afghan War 1878-80
    Third Burma War 1885-87
    Lushai Expedition 1889-90
    Upper Burma 1890-93
    First World War 1914-18
    Third Afghan War 1919
    Second World War 1939-45

    Status :On the
    independence of Pakistan in 1947, the 1st Punjab Regiment was allotted to Pakistan Army. At the time, the active battalions were 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 5th and 7th. Sikhs and Rajputs were transferred to the Indian Army and the regiment's new class composition was fixed as Punjabis and Pathans

    Battle honours
    Sholinghur, Carnatic, Mysore, Seringapatam, Assaye, Leswarree, Bourbon, Nagpore, Ava, Bhurtpore, China, Burma 1885-87, Suez Canal, Egypt 1915, Shaiba, Kut al Amara 1915, Ctesiphon, Defence of Kut al Amara, Tigris 1916, Kut al Amara 1917, Baghdad, Mesopotamia 1915-18, Aden, NW Frontier India 1915, Afghanistan 1919, Agordat, Keren, Abyssinia 1940-41, Damascus, Syria 1941, Sidi Barrani, Omars, Benghazi, Gazala, Defence of Alamein Line, El Alamein, North Africa 1940-43, Arezzo, Advance to Florence, Gothic Line, The Senio, Italy 1943-45, Pyuntaza-Shwegyin, Yenengyaung 1942, Monywa 1942, Donbaik, Htizwe, North Arakan, Buthidaung, Razabil, Mayu Tunnels, Maungdaw, Ngakyedauk Pass, Imphal, Tamu Road, Litan, Kanglatongbi, Kohima, Defence of Kohima, Relief of Kohima, Jail Hill, Ukhrul, Kennedy Peak, Kalewa, Meiktila, Defence of Meiktila, Taungtha, The Irrawaddy, Rangoon Road, Pyawbwe, Shwemyo Bluff, Pyinmana, Toungoo, Pegu 1945, Sittang 1945, Ramree, Burma 1942-45,
     
  18. F-14B

    F-14B #iamPUROHIT Senior Member

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    10th Baluch Regiment

    Active 1922–1956
    Allegiance [​IMG] Indian Empire (1922 - 47)
    [​IMG] Pakistan (1947 - 56)
    Branch [​IMG] Indian Army
    [​IMG] Pakistan Army
    Type Infantry
    Regimental Centre Karachi
    Uniform Rifle Green; faced red
    War Cry Kai Kai
    Engagements Expedition to Aden 1839
    Anglo-Persian War 1856-57
    Indian Rebellion of 1857
    Taiping Rebellion 1860-64
    Abyssinian Campaign 1868
    Second Afghan War 1878-80
    Anglo-Egyptian War 1882
    Third Burma War 1885-87
    British East Africa 1896
    British East Africa 1897-99
    The Boxer Rebellion 1900
    British Somaliland 1908-10
    First World War 1914-18
    Third Afghan War 1919
    Iraqi Revolt 1920
    Burmese Rebellion 1931-32
    Second World War 1939-45

    The 10th Baluch or Baluch Regiment[1] was a regiment of the British Indian Army from 1922 to 1947. After the independence, it was transferred to the Pakistan Army. In 1956, it was amalgamated with the 8th Punjab and Bahawalpur Regiments. During more than a hundred years of military service, the 10th Baluch Regiment acquired an enviable reputation as one of the most distinguished among the fabled regiments of the British Indian Army. Its long list of honours and awards includes four Victoria Crosses

    The Baluch Regiment originated in the Army of Bombay Presidency in 1844, when Sir Charles Napier raised the 1st Belooch (old spelling of Baluch) Battalion (raised as the Scinde Beloochee Corps and designated as 27th Regiment of Bombay Native Infantry in 1861) for local service in the newly conquered province of Sindh. Two years later, another Belooch battalion was raised (designated as the 29th Regiment of Bombay Native Infantry in 1861), while in 1858, John Jacob raised Jacob's Rifles (30th Regiment of Bombay Native Infantry), which would soon become the 3rd Belooch Regiment. The term 'local' was interpreted fairly loosely when it became necessary to send the 2nd Beloochees to the Persian War in 1856-57, a campaign frequently overshadowed by the events of the Indian Mutiny in 1857. The 1st was in Karachi when the news of the insurrection reached the Commissioner. Sir Bartle Frere dispatched them with all haste, on foot across the Sindh desert in May, to join the siege artillery train on its way to Delhi; the only Bombay unit to join the Delhi Field Force. The regiment was brought into line for its services in North India as the 27th Regiment of Bombay Native Infantry. Meanwhile, the 2nd Beloochees were also regularized as the 29th Regiment. In 1862, the 2nd Beloochees were dispatched to China to suppress the Taiping Rebellion. Two years later, they became some of the first foreign troops to be stationed in Japan, when two companies were sent to Yokohama as a part of the garrison guarding the British legation. The 1st Beloochees greatly distinguished themselves in the tough Abyssinian Campaign of 1868 and were made Light Infantry as a reward. All Baloch battalions took part in the Second Afghan War of 1878-80, where the Jacob's Rifles suffered heavy casualties at the Battle of Maiwand. The 1st Belooch Regiment again distinguished itself in 1885-87 during the Third Burma War.[2][3]

    In 1891, two battalions of Bombay Infantry also became "Baluchi," when they were reconstituted with Baluchis, Hazaras and Pathans from Baluchistan and localized in the province. The first of these, the 24th (Baluchistan) Infantry was raised in 1820, while the other, 26th (Baluchistan) Infantry was raised in 1825.[4] Following the Kitchener Reforms of 1903, these battalions were redesignated as the 124th Duchess of Connaught's Own Baluchistan Infantry, 126th Baluchistan Infantry, 127th Queen Mary's Own Baluch Light Infantry, 129th Duke of Connaught's Own Baluchis and 130th King George's Own Baluchis (Jacob's Rifles). In 1914, their full dress uniforms included red trousers worn with rifle green or drab tunics

    During the First World War, most of the regiments raised second battalions, while the 124th Baluchistan Infantry raised two battalions. Only 2/124th Baluchistan Infantry of the wartime raisings was retained after the post-war reforms.

    The 129th DCO Baluchis served on the Western Front in France and Belgium, where they became the first Indian regiment to attack the Germans and the only Indian regiment to fight in both the First & Second Battles of Ypres. At Hollebeke, during the First Ypres, Sepoy Khudadad Khan became the first Muslim and pre partition Indian soldier to win the Victoria Cross; Britain's highest decoration for valour. Prior to 1911 pre partition Indian soldiers had not been eligible for the Victoria Cross. The battalion would go on to serve with distinction in German East Africa alongside the 127th QMO Baluch Light Infantry and 130th KGO Baluchis. Meanwhile, the 1st and 3rd Battalions of 124th DCO Baluchistan Infantry served in Persia, while the 2nd distinguished itself in Mesopotamia and Palestine.

    After the First World War, a major re-organization of British Indian Army took place. Most of the wartime units were disbanded, while the remaining single-battalion regiments were merged to form large regimental groups of 4-6 battalions each. Among these was the 10th Baluch Regiment, formed in 1922 at Rajkot (Rajasthan) from the five old Baluch battalions and the second battalion of 124th Baluchistan Infantry. The regimental depot later shifted to Karachi. The distinctive rifle green and red uniform of the old Baluch battalions was adopted by the entire regiment. The officers wore a cherry boss surmounted by a silver 'X' on field and forage caps, while the old battalion badges continued to be worn on pagris and helmets by the 1st, 3rd, 4th and 5th Battalions. It was not until 1945 that a single cap badge was adopted by the regiment on introduction of berets during the Second World War. It consisted of a Roman numeral 'X' within a crescent moon, a crown above and title scroll below, all in white metal. The badges of rank were in black metal with red edging, while the lanyard was of rifle green cord with two red runners. Another distinctive feature of Baluchi uniforms were plain silver ball buttons worn on service and mess dresses

    The line up of the new regiment was:[3]

    • 1st Battalion (DCO) - 124th Duchess of Connaught's Own Baluchistan Infantry.
    • 2nd Battalion - 126th Baluchistan Infantry.
    • 3rd Battalion (QMO) - 127th Queen Mary's Own Baluch Light Infantry.
    • 4th Battalion (DCO) - 129th Duke of Connaught's Own Baluchis.
    • 5th Battalion (KGO) - 130th King George's Own Baluchis (Jacob's Rifles).
    • 10th (Training) Battalion - 2/124th Duchess of Connaught's Own Baluchistan Infantry.
    The regiment's record of service in the war was once again most impressive. It suffered 6572 casualties and won numerous gallantry awards including two Victoria Crosses to Naik Fazal Din and Sepoy Bhandari Ram. During the Second World War, the regiment raised another ten battalions, although most of them were disbanded after the war. At the end of 1945, the 10th Baluch Regiment lost its number and became The Baluch Regiment.
    At the time of independence, the active battalions were 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 7th & 17th. The regiment was allotted to Pakistan. Dogra companies of the Baluch Regiment were transferred to the Indian Army. The Regimental Centre shifted to Quetta in 1947 to make room for the Government offices in the new capital of Pakistan


    Battle Honours


    Battle HonoursEdit


     
  19. F-14B

    F-14B #iamPUROHIT Senior Member

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    Alwar State Forces

    Delhi Independent Brigade area - Alwar,

    Jaipur Residency, Rajputana Agency

    Headquarters

    Alwar Mangal Lancers: Alwar

    Alwar Jey Paltan: Alwar

    Alwar Pratap Paltan: Alwar

    fa-01-02_26.jpg
     
  20. F-14B

    F-14B #iamPUROHIT Senior Member

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    Location:
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    Bahawalpar State Forces: Lahore District - Bahawalpur, Punjab States

    Headquarters

    His Highness the Nawab of Bahawalpar's Own Bodyguard Lancers: Sadiq Garh Palace, Dera Nawab Sahib
    1st Bahawalpar Infantry (Sadiq Battalion) : Sadiq Garh Palace, Dera Nawab Sahib
    2nd Bahawalpar Light Infantry (Huron Battalion) : Sadiq Garh Palace, Dera Nawab Sadib

    Bahawalpur was a semiautonomous Princely State within British India, lying along the left bank of the River Sutlej in areas now comprising southwestern Punjab. At the time of independence in 1947, it acceded to Pakistan.[2] The two senior battalions of Bahawalpur Regiment trace their origin to 1827, when the Nawab of Bahawalpur first organized his forces. In 1848, Bahawalpur State actively supported the British war effort during the Second Sikh War with 7000 infantry and 2500 cavalry, who were engaged in operations near Multan. During the Great Indian Rebellion of 1857, Bahawalpur State troops aided the British "in quelling mutinies in Oudh, a Bahawalpur contingent of 1000 men occupying Sirsa and maintaining quiet in the district."[3] During the Second Afghan War of 1878-80, “Five hundred men of the State Infantry and 100 sowars were stationed at Dera Ghazi Khan and did useful service in strengthening the frontier posts vacated by regular regiments.”[3] In 1889, Bahawalpur State Forces were accepted as Imperial Service Troops, and a small force of cavalry and infantry was placed at the disposal of the British for use in emergencies. However, in 1901, the force was disbanded and in its place, Bahawalpur raised a camel baggage train with an escort of mounted infantry, called the Bahawalpur Imperial Service Mounted Rifles and Camel Transport Corps, which would go on to become the 1st Bahawalpur Sadiq Battalion in 1924. In 1912, the colour of their uniform was khaki with green facings

    • 1st (Sadiq) Battalion The Bahawalpur Regiment - 8th Battalion The Baluch Regiment - 1st Abbasia
    • 2nd (Haroon) Battalion The Bahawalpur Regiment - 9th Battalion The Baluch Regiment
    • 3rd (Abbas) Battalion The Bahawalpur Regiment - 20th Battalion The Baluch Regiment
    • 4th Battalion The Bahawalpur Regiment - 21st Battalion The Baluch Regiment
    • Battle honours awarded by the Governments of British India and Pakistan[1][7]
    Suez Canal, Egypt 1915-17, Gaza, Megiddo, Nablus, Palestine 1917–18, NW Frontier, India 1917, Baluchistan 1918, Johore, Singapore Island, Malaya 1941–42.

    • Battle honours awarded by the Nawab of Bahawalpur[1][4]
    1st Kabul War 1837, Multan Campaign 1848, Mutiny 1857, 2nd Kabul War 1879, Great War 1914-18, East Africa 1915, Mesopotamia 1915, Persian Gulf 1916-18, Jordan Valley 1918, Waziristan 1917, Marri Field Force 1918, Afghanistan 1919, Kot Sabzal 1930.
     
  21. F-14B

    F-14B #iamPUROHIT Senior Member

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    Hyderabad State Forces:

    images (53).jpg
    1st (Nizam's Own) Hyderabad Imperial Service Lancers: Asufnagar
    2nd (Nizam's Own) Hyderbad Imperial Service Lancers: Golconda. Chawan Muhamundi
    3rd Hyderabad (Nizam's Own) Golconda Lancers: Golconda Fort
    Hyderabad Cavalry Training Squadron: Asafnagar
    'A' Battery, Hyderabad Horse Artillery: Mullapalli
    1st Hyderabad Infantry: Goshamahal
    2nd Hyderabad Infantry: Chandraingutta
    3rd Hyderabad Infantry (Nizam's Own): Saifabad
    Hyderabad Infantry Training Company: Nampally, Saifabad
     
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