Barbaric Paper Dragon People's Republic of China: Idiotic Musings.

Discussion in 'Members Corner' started by Project Dharma, Aug 21, 2017.

  1. Villager

    Villager Regular Member

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2016
    Messages:
    595
    Likes Received:
    560
    China Refusal To Admit Its Rape Problem. I Would Know.
    [​IMG]
    By Bethany Allen-Ebrahimian, Foreign Policy
    China's repressed struggle became visible last week as America belatedly dealt with longstanding sexual assault allegations against Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein.

    The Communist Party wants to blame Hollywood and "loose women," instead of acknowledging its own epidemic levels of sexual assault.
    [​IMG]
    A couple walk pass a condom vending machine July 16, 2002, on a street in Beijing, China. (Getty Images)

    In the fall of 2004, when I was 19, I studied abroad in the beautiful coastal Chinese city of Xiamen. One Friday evening, I attended an English meetup at a local university, hoping to make some Chinese friends. To my surprise, a group of Chinese men — young, but older than I was — flocked to me, asking me repeatedly if I had any boyfriends, if my dating life resembled the popular American sitcom Friends, and if I was “open,” which I later learned was a poor translation for a Chinese phrase that meant “sexually liberal.” I was not.

    The next day, one of them asked me to go swimming at a local hot springs with a group of his friends. It sounded fun. I said yes. But as it turned out, there were no friends, and I had no cellphone. Later that day, he raped me. That moment marked a new era for me — the Before Christ and Anno Domini that split my soul and altered the trajectory of my life

    Unwittingly, I had walked into the middle of a struggle to redefine Chinese identity, in a nation at times unable to come to terms with its own sexual revolution — or the epidemic of violence behind its closed doors.

    China’s repressed struggle became visible last week as America belatedly dealt with longstanding sexual assault allegations against Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein. Investigations by the New York Times and the New Yorker revealed Weinstein’s decades of abuse and assault against dozens of women in which a male-dominated media industry was complicit. The allegations triggered a society-wide reckoning, as women across the country and around the world who have experienced sexual assault posted the deceptively simple five letters “me too” on their Facebook and Twitter accounts. It was a stunning public display that seemed to shed light on a universal experience.

    It was just at this point that Chinese state-run media decided to wade into this shared public moment of confession and vulnerability in order to win points for its supposed civilizational superiority.

    On Oct. 16, the government-run English-language newspaper China Daily published an opinion article called “Weinstein case demonstrates cultural differences,” that posed the question: “What prevents sexual harassment from being a common phenomenon in China, as it is in most Western societies?” Sexual violence wasn’t universal, the author — Sava Hassan, a “Canadian Egyptian educator” who taught in China — argued. “It is a well-known fact that China is a traditional society based upon commendable values and virtues that respect the dignity and humanity of its citizens, regardless of their gender,” it explained. “Chinese authority deals harshly with those who disrespect themselves by behaving inappropriately toward others.” (The article has since been removed from the site.)

    The idea that Chinese society is somehow inherently less sexist than other societies is, of course, ludicrous. But it’s part of a worldview, heavily promoted by the Chinese Communist Party, that sees violence and social instability as an ideological or even civilizational flaw. And with Western democracy as its primary competitor, the party takes every opportunity, no matter how vulgar, to demonstrate China’s superiority over what it presents as a chaotic, violent, and debauched West.

    That explains both the tasteless China Daily piece — and what happened to me.

    Up until the early 20th century, under Chinese family structure and sexual values remained — to use the party’s own term — “feudal.” Women fell under the authority of their male relatives, and female chastity was highly prized, while men could keep concubines. After 1949, the party prioritized marriage reform as part of its goal to create a New China by sweeping away Western imperialism and feudal traditions alike. The very first law passed in the newly established People’s Republic was the marriage law of 1950, which encouraged love-based matches, made concubinage and child marriage illegal, and gave men and women equal rights in divorce proceedings.

    This was no Western-style sexual revolution; Chinese society remained deeply conservative, and the Communist state preferred to keep it that way. Sex before marriage was illegal, sex education was largely nonexistent, and publications about sex or romance were prohibited as bourgeois. Behind closed doors, the abuse of women was still common. Coercion by their superiors in the Communist hierarchy often appears in memoirs, and sexual assault on the young women traveling as Red Guards or “sent down to the countryside” from the city during the Cultural Revolution seems to have been frequent. Actress Bai Ling has talked of her sexual abuse while serving in a People’s Liberation Army “entertainment unit” as a teenager.


    But with the economic reforms after 1978, industrialization and urbanization radically altered the nature of relationships. Factories sprouted up in cities across the eastern coast. The flow of rural migrants into urban areas in search of work removed them from direct family and village oversight. New education and career opportunities kept young people single longer and threw them together in confined urban spaces away from families. Young people in China began to do what young people in similar situations elsewhere in the world have always done — flirt, date, have sex. In 1989, just 15.5 percent of China’s populace had sex before marriage, according to Chinese sexologist Li Yinhe; by 2012, that number had risen to more than 70 percent.

    Chinese attitudes towards sex in some ways lurched into modernity, while in other ways remained deeply traditional. Prostitution flourished but women were still expected to be virgins when they married. Discussion of sexually transmitted diseases remained taboo; the government was complicit in the cover-upof an AIDS epidemic in the 1990s. Rules against unmarried couples sharing hotel rooms were finally lifted in the 2000s, years after they’d stopped being enforced, although the rare children born outside of marriage faced massive state stigma. To help keep the population under control, the state encouraged the use of contraception, and grocery stores put brightly-wrapped condom packages in the checkout aisles next to mints and gum. But public discussion and debate over these sweeping changes remained stunted. Even the phrase “cohabitation” could embarrass polite company.

    With China’s opening also came first a trickle, and then a flood, of foreign popular culture. Japanese fashion, Hong Kong magazines, and Hollywood films exposed a mass Chinese audience to ideas of young love, romantic choice, and sexual freedom. When a slightly censored version of The Bridges of Madison County, a movie that portrayed a passionate extramarital affair, opened in Beijing in 1996, it sold 1.3 million tickets on its first weekend there.

    But it wasn’t easy for many Chinese to adapt to the shredding of the asceticism of the early Communist era. The party had long linked China’s success, and its own legitimacy, to an essential struggle against imperialism, capitalism, and Western bourgeois values. China’s economic distinctiveness relative to the West was swiftly disintegrating. Would its sense of moral distinctiveness vanish as well?

    The problem is that the economic changes were helping cause the moral and behavioral ones — and the state preferred to lionize the former while officially opposing the latter. So rather than acknowledge the ways that urbanization, industrialization, and globalization were undermining traditional ways of life, Chinese authorities conveniently blamed their country’s new bedroom behaviors on an insidious, foreign enemy. As early as 1990, state media blamed the proliferation of pornography within China on “Western cultural infiltration.” A rash of recent laws prohibit television and movies from depicting cleavage, one-night stands, and “admiration for Western lifestyles.

    But these chastisements did little to alter anyone’s behavior, and it wasn’t long before China’s free market economy had exploited, for its own ends, the association between sex and the West. Pictures of foreign women — typically blonde Caucasians, like me — came to regularly grace packages of lingerie, sex toys, and knockoff condom brands. Inevitably, the connection entered the Chinese vernacular. I’ve heard Chinese men describe the Chinese women who frequent Shanghai nightclubs as “more Westernized than the West.”

    But perhaps nothing clinched the deal like Friends. The American sitcom became an unparalleled sensation across China, so popular that its characters and storylines remain a lingua franca between young Chinese and visiting Americans to this day; there’s even a Friends-themed coffee shop in Beijing. In the show’s 10 seasons, the six main characters had a combined total of 85 sexual partners who appeared on screen. The sitcom — and by association, American culture and the entire West writ large — came to embody the sexual freedoms that had revolutionized the Chinese bedroom.

    The perceived image of white women in China “fused the sexual and the political,” noted Louisa Schein, a professor of anthropology at Rutgers University, in her 1994 article, “The Consumption of Color and the Politics of White Skin in Post-Mao China.” When Chinese looked at the bodies of Western women, they saw freedom, democracy, abandon, critique of morality, or any number of different ideas, wrote Schein. The white woman thus served as an important element in the “recuperation of the East-West binarism” — a stable, essential Chinese society and an inferior, borrowed Western culture — a duality that provided an “antidote” to the rapid, chaotic influx of modernity and change.

    In other words, the images Chinese saw in illicit magazines and on television and, later, the internet, made it easy to write off these sweeping social changes as a kind of Western sexual imperialism. The result was a workable solution to the problem of Chinese identity in a post-communist society — Chinese may choose to participate in casual relationships, but in doing so, they would be indulging in a type of freedom that is inherently Western. The same cognitive dissonance worked for the Communist Party as well. Sexual freedom was permitted, but any resulting social ills were understood to be the fault of the West, not the Chinese government.

    Of course, when I was 19, I knew nothing of this. I’d just stepped off a plane from my small Christian university in a West Texas town, where there were hundreds of churches but just a handful of clubs. That Friday evening at English Corner, the Chinese men around me entertained a notion of American womanhood that bore little resemblance to me, or most other young American women for that matter.When they looked at me, they saw Rachel, or Phoebe, or Monica. They saw the living embodiment of sexual revolution. They saw a West that existed only in their own minds, a West without values or dignity.

    The next day, in a last-ditch effort to save myself, I told the attacker I was a virgin. He didn’t believe me. He simply couldn’t.

    This was far from an isolated incident for me, though it was by far the worst. In the four years I lived in China over the past decade and a half, I lost count of the number of Chinese men who assume that because a woman is American, they could touch her, say lewd things to her, or take her home with them; they often said as much. “Many Chinese people, older and conservative-minded especially, ” said Lijia Zhang, journalist and author of the novel Lotus, “think all Western people are sexually loose, women in particular.”

    American television didn’t cause this behavior, of course; it’s simply become a new way to excuse it. It may come as no surprise that Chinese society, stubbornly patriarchal, and its governing party, obsessed with stability, have both been unable to acknowledge the epidemic of violence against women that flourishes within the country. In a 2013 U.N. Population Fund survey of one Chinese county, fully one in five male respondents admitted to having committed rape. Two percent admitted they had participated in a gang rape; 44 percent of men said they had engaged in physical violence against an intimate partner.

    “This is endemic to the Chinese system, it’s a severe problem,” said Leta Hong Fincher, author of the forthcoming book Betraying Big Brother: The Rise of China’s Feminist Resistance. The Chinese government does not release statistics on sexual assault, viewing it as a politically sensitive social problem, Hong Fincher explained. “China doesn’t want to admit how bad the problems are with sexual violence … and of course there’s an ideological component to that.”

    Violent cases tend to trigger the Chinese government’s instincts for self-preservation rather than criminal justice.
    .

    The denial at work is delicately intertwined with nationalism and political ideology.
    When India’s Daughter, the 2015 documentary about that rape, was released, it was not censored but rather was widely available on Chinese streaming websites.

    At the time, I had a Chinese colleague who, like many of the young Chinese men of his generation, evinced a confident and unquestioned nationalism. After watching the film, he expressed to me his gratitude that he hailed from a better, safer country. Something like that could never happen in China, he smugly told me.

    I bit my tongue, but my hands shook as I turned back to my computer.

    Others have been braver and bolder than me. Feminist activist Li Tingting and four fellow Chinese activists attracted global attention when Chinese authorities detained them for more than a month after their March 2015 attempt to raise awareness about sexual assault on public transit. Still, there’s little chance that the #MeToo campaign will trend in China anytime soon. Chinese social media is its own isolated ecosystem, by design. Twitter and Facebook are both blocked in China, precisely so that outside ideas and movements can’t spread.

    So women will continue to pay the price for China’s inability to take responsibility for its own changing society, and for the party’s ideological insecurity both toward the wider world and within the country that it governs. I paid this price with my own body. But I will bite my tongue no more.

    Bethany Allen-Ebrahimian is a contributing writer at Foreign Policy. @BethanyAllenEbr
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2017
  2. Villager

    Villager Regular Member

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2016
    Messages:
    595
    Likes Received:
    560
    Huhhh..... Greater country, greater culture, greater civilization. All in terms of Chinese inferiority complex.
     
  3. Kshatriya87

    Kshatriya87 Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2014
    Messages:
    8,825
    Likes Received:
    9,096
    Location:
    Mumbai


    Sent from my Redmi 4A using Tapatalk
     
    Villager likes this.
  4. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Veteran Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2013
    Messages:
    14,969
    Likes Received:
    38,976
    Location:
    India
    Want Friendly Ties With Neighbours India And Bhutan, Says China


    After President Ram Nath Kovind appreciated Bhutan's support during the Doklam standoff, China today said it wants to see New Delhi and Thimphu develop "normal relations". Reacting to Bhutan King's Jigme Khesar Namgyel Wangchuck's visit to India, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesperson Hua Chunying told a media briefing that both India and Bhutan are China's close neighbours.

    "We are committed to developing friendly relations with these two countries and also we would like to see India and Bhutan developing normal relations," she said.:rofl::rofl::rofl::rofl:

    About President Kovind appreciating Bhutan's support in resolving the Doklam standoff, Ms Hua said, "You mentioned about the Indian border troops trespassing incident from June to August. We have talked about our position many times before. I believe we are also clear about that".

    :rofl::rofl:"We believe that China and India had properly settled this issue through diplomatic means. Consistent with our common interest, we hope India could follow the historical conventions and work with China to ensure peace and tranquillity of the border area," she said.:rofl::rofl:

    In his meeting with King Wangchuck, President Kovind expressed appreciation for Bhutan's support in resolving the recent standoff with China at Doklam. The manner in which both India and Bhutan stood together to address the situation in Doklam "is a clear testimony to our friendship", a Rashtrapati Bhavan statement said.

    India and China were locked in a 73-day-long standoff in Doklam, a tri-junction between India, China and Bhutan after Indian troops stopped the Chinese Army from building a road in the plateau.'''


    https://www.ndtv.com/india-news/wan...eighbours-india-and-bhutan-says-china-1770430


    :rofl::rofl::rofl:
    Just look at how the chinese bitch played with the words.
    "NORMAL RELATIONS" as if India and Bhutan had a problem before.
    :rofl::rofl::rofl:


    This is how India should take the words coming from chinese FM. I think we should put all chinese brain farts from their higher office here on this discussion as, its all idiotic musings from china


    [​IMG]
     
    Willy2 and aditya10r like this.
  5. dhananjay1

    dhananjay1 Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2013
    Messages:
    3,299
    Likes Received:
    5,510
    Location:
    india
    Indians want friendly relations with Tibet and China.
     
    Villager, aditya10r and Yggdrasil like this.
  6. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Veteran Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2013
    Messages:
    14,969
    Likes Received:
    38,976
    Location:
    India
    China proposes alternative routes for CPEC via J&K, Nepal

    China may consider alternative routes through Jammu and Kashmir to address India’s concerns regarding the China Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) that passes through Pakistan-occupied Kashmir (PoK).

    In an interaction with experts on Chinese affairs and students, Beijing’s envoy Luo Zhaohui suggested the alternative routes, and said he was keen on accomplishing a bilateral friendship and trade treaty during his stint in India.

    “We :pound:can change the name of CPEC:pound: [China Pakistan Economic Corridor]. Create an alternative corridor through Jammu and Kashmir, Nathu La pass or Nepal to deal with India’s concerns,” said the envoy in a speech at the Centre for Chinese and South-East Asian Studies in the School of Language, JNU, on Friday.:rofl::rofl:

    The Ambassador made a detailed presentation of the expectations on both sides and said that while the Dalai Lama’s presence and activities remain an issue for China, Beijing recognised that India’s expectations on the CPEC and Masood Azhar were also issues that both sides need to be deal with.


    Dynamic situation

    Referring to the dynamic situation in the world, Ambassador Luo said, “There is widespread change in world affairs since the coming to power of President Donald Trump of the U.S.” and said that the recent visit of President Trump to Beijing has proved that China is a reliable partner.

    :pound::pound:“President Trump sealed $250 billion worth of trade deals with China during his trip. Would that be possible if China was a threat,” he asked, arguing that China and India as growing economies must cooperate with each other.:pound::pound:

    “One of my goals is to have a treaty of friendship and :bs:free trade :bs:with India,” he said, elaborating that both sides need to find more areas to collaborate like the Delhi smog. “Beijing also has smog and two sides can jointly deal with this issue,” he said

    It was the first time that the Chinese ambassador was meeting Indian scholars and China experts five days after India held the first official-level meeting on the quadrilateral grouping with Japan, U.S., and Australia but the envoy declined to answer The Hindu’s question on the issue. However, he indicated his approval when a faculty member of the centre said that the quadrilateral was not a serious grouping as it could not produce a joint statement following the first meeting.


    Untapped potential

    Ambassador Luo said China and India have untapped economic potential that needs to be explored and highlighted that there is a need for balanced trade between two sides. He also announced that China plans to hold major commemorative events :bs:next year to mark the 40th anniversary of China’s economic reforms where I:rofl::rofl:ndia is expected to feature prominently.:rofl::rofl:

    http://www.thehindu.com/news/intern...tes-for-cpec-via-jk-nepal/article20546919.ece


    What an immature world view of these chinki monkeys!

    Since Donald Trump signed it...its not a threat for India :D

    Changing name of CPEC :D

    The opium has not left chinese shores
     
    Bharat Ek Khoj and Kshatriya87 like this.
  7. Kunal Biswas

    Kunal Biswas Member of the Year 2011 Moderator

    Joined:
    May 26, 2010
    Messages:
    31,124
    Likes Received:
    40,323
    Location:
    BHARAT, INDIA, HINDUSTHAN


    China has some SERIOUS firepower and military power to put onto the table of global influence. Do we as westerners underestimate them?
     
    tharun likes this.
  8. tharun

    tharun Patriot Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2014
    Messages:
    2,110
    Likes Received:
    1,290
    Location:
    Telangana/India
    Too much smoke while firing the gun and lol comedy too.
     
    aditya10r likes this.
  9. HariPrasad-1

    HariPrasad-1 Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2016
    Messages:
    5,452
    Likes Received:
    7,613
    Location:
    Gujarat
  10. Villager

    Villager Regular Member

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2016
    Messages:
    595
    Likes Received:
    560
    15 Nasty pictures of Chinese tourists that will truly disgust you

    What would you do if you ever saw these things unfolding in front of your eyes?

    Victoria Tunggono, 01 April 2016 15:47

    Brilio.net - The Chinese mainland is famous for its nastiness and unfortunately they bring the habit along when visiting other countries.

    From Thailand, Taiwan to England, the whole world knows how gross they can be. Still, we can (almost) do nothing about it for it could be the only lifestyle they know (and they mostly don’t speak other languages than their own).

    Brilio.net compiled 15 photos of how gross Chinese lifestyle can be, gathered from a few sources. What would you do if you ever saw these things unfolding in front of your eyes?

    1. A woman ignorantly tries to let her bra dry in the waiting room in a Thailand airport.

    [​IMG]

    2. A couple of Chinese tourists wash their feet on the basin in a toilet in Thailand.

    [​IMG]

    3. A local tourist chose to finish his contraband liquor when it was detected in the Guangzhou airport.

    [​IMG]

    4. The parents taught their child to poop in the middle of a Hong Kong street. Gross!

    [​IMG]

    5. No wonder adults could poop in public area shamelessly in the Singapore airport.

    [​IMG]

    6. And they would litter in the airplane. Ugh!

    [​IMG]

    7. Pooping in public transportation seems to be a normal thing for them.

    [​IMG]
     
  11. Villager

    Villager Regular Member

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2016
    Messages:
    595
    Likes Received:
    560
    8. In China, children’s pants have holes in the groin area...

    [​IMG]
    9. …which would allow them to poop easily anywhere they need to.

    [​IMG]

    10. Another pooping in public area in a Taiwan airport. Ewww!

    [​IMG]

    11. Even when visiting England—who else would poop in front of a Burberry store?

    [​IMG]

    12. They don’t bother entering a cubicle to change shirts in a toilet in the Bangkok airport.

    [​IMG]

    13. And when they got a hotel buffet dining, it seems like they had never eaten in their life!

    [​IMG]

    14. This photograph in particular made Thailand people get angry with the Chinese visitors.

    [​IMG]

    15. They also show no respect to art and beauty, as is shown with this sculpture in the shrine.

    [​IMG]

    @SexyChineseLady
     
  12. Bharat Ek Khoj

    Bharat Ek Khoj Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2016
    Messages:
    2,993
    Likes Received:
    4,921
    Location:
    Gujarat
    ^^ You gave a job to sexy lady

    Now she will refute one by one with her sexy logic :lol:
     
  13. Mikesingh

    Mikesingh Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2015
    Messages:
    5,638
    Likes Received:
    18,250
    Location:
    Tora Bora
    Chink stink!
    Untitled-1 copy.jpg Untitled-2 copy.jpg
     
  14. Villager

    Villager Regular Member

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2016
    Messages:
    595
    Likes Received:
    560
    Chinese aren't getting any smarter and civilised with their economic rise. Verry much obsessed with shitting and pissing at shocking places.

    Boy trapped in elevator after pissing in.
     
    AMCA and aditya10r like this.
  15. lcafanboy

    lcafanboy Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2013
    Messages:
    3,176
    Likes Received:
    9,472
    Location:
    bangalore
    Chinese Sperm Bank Seeks Donors. Only Good Communists Need Apply.
    Image[​IMG]
    A lab technician at the fertility clinic of Peking University Third Hospital in Beijing in 2005.CreditAgence France-Presse — Getty Images


    By Javier C. Hernández

    April 11, 2018
    查看简体中文版查看繁體中文版
    BEIJING — The advertisement for sperm donors was exacting.

    No bald men. No hereditary diseases like color blindness. And in case there were any doubts, the sperm bank at Peking University Third Hospital clarified: Only men with an abiding love for the “socialist motherland” need apply.

    President Xi Jinping’s drive to restore the Communist Party’s place at the center of everyday life in China has brought socialist banners to city streets, nationalistic rap music to the airwaves and patriotic heroes to movie theaters. Now Mr. Xi has inspired a new test of party loyalty — reproduction.

    The ad placed by the hospital sperm bank, which has circulated widely on social media in recent days, listed support for the Communist Party and Mr. Xi as its top requirements for potential donors.

    “He must have good ideological thoughts,” the ad said by way of describing ideal donors, “love the socialist motherland and support the leadership of the Chinese Communist Party.”

    ADVERTISEMENT


    Those men who were approved to donate could earn up to 5,000 renminbi, about $800, according to the ad. About 19 percent of the hospital’s applicants are accepted, according to a 2016 news report.

    The ad, widely mocked on social media, was later removed.

    “Love for the country and the party starts from sperm,” one user sarcastically wrote on Weibo, a microblogging site.


    You have 4 free articles remaining.

    Subscribe to The Times


    Several commenters questioned the basis for the criteria. The ad also said that donors needed to be law-abiding, “honest and upright” and free of “political issues.”

    “Where is the scientific proof?” another Weibo user wrote.

    A staff member at the Peking University Third Hospital, reached by telephone, declined to comment.

    ADVERTISEMENT


    Mr. Xi’s demands for unflinching party loyalty have been known to encourage overzealous action from officials eager to prove their devotion. Critics have said Mr. Xi is encouraging the return of a personality cult unseen since the days of Mao Zedong.


    Under Mr. Xi, government officials have also spoken frequently about the need to instill the so-called “red gene” in younger generations, a reference to carrying on the Communist tradition.

    William A. Callahan, a professor of international relations at the London School of Economics, said the ad reflected Mr. Xi’s efforts to blend science with ideology.

    “Nationalism and socialism are mixing in peculiar ways to promote Chinese identity as a bloodline race,” he said. “The sperm bank announcement shows how the party increasingly dominates Chinese politics, and how nationalism increasingly is defined according to racial purity.”

    ADVERTISEMENT


    The ad comes at a time when Chinese sperm banks are facing pressure to attract donors, as more families seek to have a second child following the relaxation of the one-child policy. The country faces intense pressure to grow its labor force as its society ages, and some sperm banks have resorted to using patriotic calls to persuade young men to donate.

    Some were skeptical of the ad’s significance, noting that it appeared to be an isolated case.

    Hu Xijin, the editor of Global Times, a staunchly nationalistic mainland newspaper, said the ad was “ridiculous” and seemed aimed at stirring up critical news reports.

    “Leaders of this kind of organization who made this kind of accident should be asked to take responsibility and be given punishment,” Mr. Hu wrote in a Weibo post.
    https://mobile.nytimes.com/2018/04/11/world/asia/china-sperm-communist-party.html

    All communist sperms present on forum.

    So @nimo_cn @rockdog @badguy2000 before your dads injected sperms into your mom's it was checked whether it's truly communist or not. No doubt you people are communist CCP robots in shape of humans....:pound::pound::pound::rofl::rofl::rofl:
     
  16. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Veteran Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2013
    Messages:
    14,969
    Likes Received:
    38,976
    Location:
    India
    The great musings from china
    30 cars!!
     
  17. Bhumihar

    Bhumihar Jako Rakhe Saiyan Mar Sake Na Koi Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2017
    Messages:
    3,730
    Likes Received:
    10,091
    Location:
    West Bengal, kolkata
    Let's do this in India as well but instead communist we will collect Sanghi sperm :megusta:
     
    angeldude13 likes this.
  18. angeldude13

    angeldude13 Lestat De Lioncourt Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2010
    Messages:
    2,367
    Likes Received:
    3,207
    You. I like you :D
    ....................
     
    Bhumihar likes this.
  19. HariPrasad-1

    HariPrasad-1 Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2016
    Messages:
    5,452
    Likes Received:
    7,613
    Location:
    Gujarat
    So that only cpc loyalist born in cjina.
     
  20. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Veteran Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2013
    Messages:
    14,969
    Likes Received:
    38,976
    Location:
    India
    The Chinese military's biggest weakness is inexperience

    China's People's Liberation Army Gen. He Lei, one of the more hawkish voices asserting Beijing's absolute rights to the South China Sea, made a telling observation at a defense conference in Singapore that reveals his military's biggest weakness.

    China has undertaken massive strides to build a world-class navy. After what the nationalists in China call a century of humiliation, going back to Japan's occupation of China, Beijing has emerged as a military power that could soon surpass the US.

    But even with the world's largest military, cheap labor, massive spy services, and suspected cyber theft of US military secrets, the Chinese can't match the US where it counts.


    "I am retiring soon. My one big regret is that I never had a chance to fight in a war," Gen. He said, according to Aaron Connelly, director of the Southeast Asia Project at the Lowy Institute.


    Though it's strange to regret peace, He correctly identified what the Academy of Military Science of the Chinese People's Liberation Army previously told Business Insider was the Chinese military's biggest weakness: inexperience.

    The People's Liberation Army, the military owned by China's Communist Party, has never fought a real war. Its missions center around humanitarian relief and policing its own borders. Besides a brief fights with Vietnam, India, and Russia on its borders, as well as involvement in the Korean War, the entire post-World War II period for China has been peaceful.

    Meanwhile, the US and Russia, other top-tier militaries, have engaged in regular battles.

    While much of China's emerging new military doctrine seems sound in theory, it's yet to be tested.


    China can build ships and planes, but can't shake the doubt ::

    China has impressed with quick progress on military projects like fighter jets and building new navy ships, but US Navy Vice Admiral Tom Rowden, the commander of the US Navy's Surface forces, told Defense News in 2017 that it might just be hype.

    Rowden explained that while a US and a Chinese ship may both appear combat-ready,"[o]ne of them couldn't fight their way out of a wet paper bag and the other one will rock anything that it comes up against."

    But that's just at sea, and ground combat with its toll on individual soldiers is a whole different beast. When Chinese soldiers, many of them conscripts, are tested in battle, it's unclear if they'll soldier on with the same grit as the US's all-volunteer force.

    While the world can appreciate peace and a lack of fighting, as China looks to displace the US as the dominant military power, it will remain untested and doubt-ridden until it faces real combat

    https://www.wearethemighty.com/chinese-militarys-biggest-weakness-inexperience
     
    sthf and nongaddarliberal like this.

Share This Page