Arjun Main Battle Tank (MBT) Mark II

Discussion in 'Indian Army' started by DivineHeretic, May 23, 2013.

  1. G10

    G10 Regular Member

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    ‍♂️Such parts are always a forged piece in auto industry. If this piece is not a forged, the design engineers in our private heavy auto industry are much better equipped than in defence.
    This is exactly where bharat forge earns his bread and butter.
     
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  2. darshan978

    darshan978 Regular Member

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    Our babu engineers are very rigid they do only what is told no more input or contribution unlike private players
     
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  3. Shaitan

    Shaitan Zandu balm all day Senior Member

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    ARRV


    =========================================
     
  4. WolfPack86

    WolfPack86 Senior Member Senior Member

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    India's arjun mk 2 tank.
     
  5. Vorschlaghammer

    Vorschlaghammer Regular Member

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    Fun fact: The Leopard paint scheme is a variant of a type of urban camouflage, first devised by the British garrison in West Berlin for their Chieftain tanks in the 1980s. It came to be known as Berlin Camouflage, and was apparently quite effective.

    http://www.emlra.org/index.php/articles/berlin-brigade-urban-paint-scheme
     
  6. tejas warrior

    tejas warrior Senior Member Senior Member

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  7. Bhoot Pishach

    Bhoot Pishach Regular Member

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    https://www.ndtv.com/blog/why-the-a...its-best-bet-yet-1797209?pfrom=home-topscroll

    Why The Army's Arjun Tank May Be Its Best Bet Yet

    Published: January 08, 2018 14:30 IST

    [​IMG]
    Vishnu Som

    For decades, the made-in-India Arjun tank was seen as an also-ran, a noble Indian effort but one that fell short of the Army's expectations. Yes, the Army would acquire the Arjun in limited numbers but by no means would it be a replacement for the Russian-built T-72 or T-90, the mainstay of the Army's armoured formations. The numbers tell the story - more than 1,200 T-90 tanks are in service with the Army presently. By the time the last T-90s roll in, India will end up operating more than 2000 of the tanks. By contrast, the Army employs only 124 Arjun tanks in just two of its 67 Armoured regiments.

    Does that mean that the Arjun is a bad tank? It really depends who you ask. For years, cherry-picked data on the Arjun tank's faults seemed to highlight a series of seemingly insurmountable obstacles - the tank was too heavy, it wasn't reliable and it couldn't fire an anti-tank missile. This is all true, but was this reason enough to stifle the growth of the indigenously built tank?

    [​IMG]
    Arjun tanks of the Army's 43 Armoured Regiment are a part of RAPID or Reorganised Army Plains Infantry Division.

    To get a clear idea, I travelled to the Army's 43 Armoured Regiment in Jaisalmer armed with a few facts that the Army doesn't usually want to talk about. In 2010, in comparative trials between the Arjun and the T-90, not only did the Arjun hold its own, it was actually better in some respects than the Russian tank. In exercises lasting 96 hours, the Arjun and the T-90 faced off on 20 key operational parameters. Key among them were mobility, loading the tank with ammunition, tactical manoeuvres and the most significant of all, firing at the Army's Mahajan ranges in Rajasthan. The Arjun was found to be comparable to the T-90 in almost all respects and better in aspects of mobility - aided in no small measure by its German-made 1,400 horsepower engine which is significantly more powerful than the powerpack employed on the T-90.

    The invitation to visit the Arjun tank formation was unexpected. For years, I had made requests to visit an Arjun regiment only to be denied permission by Army Headquarters, worried about a possible controversy if 'the true story' of the Arjun were to emerge. There were some valid reasons for this concern. For decades, the Army has successfully operated the T-72 tank and the T-90, now being acquired, is based on this tank. Acquisition of the Arjun would result in a logistics nightmare since it has an entirely different supply chain of components. What's more, the Arjun, for decades, was a tank seemingly always in the process of being developed. Tired of waiting for its development cycle to end, and worried about the depleting strength of its tank units, the Army pushed for the Russian tanks and eventually got them.

    [​IMG]
    Two Army Armoured Regiments deploy the Arjun tank.

    What many hadn't catered for was the day when the production version of the Arjun, the Arjun Mk 1 not only starting exhibiting qualities of a genuine world beater but also seemed to have overcome many of its key problem areas. For starters - its weight. At 58.5 tonnes, the Arjun is among the heaviest tanks in the world, difficult to transport by rail and difficult to operate in areas where existing bridges and culverts could not handle its bulk. But today, in 2018, most of these problems have been resolved - an indigenously built bridge-layer, the Sarvatra, has been designed, from its inception, with the Arjun tank in mind - and can handle the weight of the tank with ease. The Sarvatra has been trial evaluated by 2 Arjun regiments and is in the process of induction. The Railways have deployed a type of bogey called BFAT (Bogey Flat Arjun Type) designed to transport the tank to areas where it may need to be operationally deployed. What's more, despite its weight, the nominal ground pressure of the tank or kilos per square centimeter, is comparable with any modern tank.

    Neither does the actual fighting ability of the Arjun Mk 1 fall short of tanks of its generation - A French built thermal imaging sight (which allows operations in pitch darkness) allows the detection of targets 5 kms away, recognition at 3 kms and identification 2 kilometres away.

    [​IMG]
    Arjun tank commander's position with gunners position below.

    Any enemy tank can be taken out at a range of 3 kilometres through the Arjun's 120 mm main gun, an entirely indigenous effort. The tank fires 2 kinds of shells - APFSDS (Armour Piercing Fin Stabilised Discarding Sabot) which can breach the armour of enemy tanks and HESH (High Explosive Squash Head) rounds meant to take on 'softer' targets including armoured personnel carriers or infantry bunkers. The accuracy of the system is such that 80 per cent of all targets are taken out with the first shell that is fired even when the tank is on the move - this compares favourably with any tank in the world. Key to ensuring this hit-rate is the Arjun suspension. An indigenous hydro-pneumatic unit, the suspension lets the Arjun glide over undulating cross-country terrain at 40 kilometres per hour while ensuring that the gun is stable enough to fire accurately.

    What the Arjun Mk 1 lacks is an anti tank guided missile and new generation Explosive Reactive Armour, designed to defeat incoming missiles. It also lacks electronic countermeasures designed to spook enemy missiles once they have been launched.

    But here too, there are solutions - there is a new Arjun tank, its called the Arjun Mark 2, and its better than the existing tank in just about every critical parameter. Unveiled a few years ago, the Arjun Mk 2 incorporates 70 changes demanded by the Army. Its laser warning control system detects a missile homing in on the Arjun and fires aerosol grenades to confuse the incoming missile's seeker head. The tank is fitted with new Explosive Reactive Armour that the Mark 1 lacks and features a remote control weapon system - an externally mounted gun designed to take on helicopters and drones. It also has a new integrated fire control system with an automatic target tracker, all systems which are designed to make the Arjun Mk 2's weapon system more accurate than its predecessor. Unfortunately, the Israeli made LAHAT missile meant to be fired through the tank's main gun failed its tests - it could not engage targets at ranges less than 1.2 kilometres with the precision that the Army required, a problem more to do with the operational philosophy of the missile in Israeli service. It turns out that the Israeli Army usually does not use anti-tank missiles at short ranges preferring to use the tank's primary weapon, its kinetic energy shells which are both faster and more lethal than anti-tank missiles in a close-range duel between tanks. India has since decided to built its own anti-tank missile.

    [​IMG]
    The Arjun project had to overcome adverse commentary from groups more impressed by foreign wares.

    There are interesting similarities between the Arjun project and the indigenous Tejas Light Combat Aircraft - both the Tejas and the Arjun have had protracted development phases - having to overcoming not just technical challenges in development but also adverse commentary from groups more impressed by foreign wares. Both have now emerged as very competent platforms at a time when Make in India is one of the government's flagship programmes.

    Last month, in a clear signal that it had not lost hope in the Tejas, the government paved the way for the manufacture of 83 Tejas Mk-1A fighters in a deal likely to be worth close to Rs.60,000 crores. In September, the new Defence Minister Nirmala Sitharaman visited 43 Armoured Regiment to get a first hand look at the Arjun tank. A month later, she visited the Combat Vehicles Research and Development Establishment in Chennai where the tank was developed - signals which some say are an indicator that the Arjun main battle tank's best days are yet to come.
     
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  8. Kshithij

    Kshithij DharmaYoddha Senior Member

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    Why is this person claiming that Tejas cost is 60000 crore? Even if it is for entire 123 fighters, it still comes to 80 million a plane. Is this guy mentally sound in the first place? I can't believe anything about his Arjun Mk2 review either after this
     
  9. pankaj nema

    pankaj nema Senior Member Senior Member

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  10. Vinod DX9

    Vinod DX9 Senior Member Senior Member

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    A very old Arjun prototype PicsArt_01-16-09.22.21.jpg
     
  11. torque456

    torque456 Regular Member

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    Since Pakistan is buying vt4 seemingly, I suspect army might be interested in acquiring a heavier tank, i.e. arjun. All the buzz about Arjun and it's supposed turnaround is I guess to welcome it in the army.

    Another big factor I guess is cvrde is located in Tamil Nadu and sitharaman is from the same state. She will want some jobs and economic dividends for her home state. Even parrikar tried everything to be shifted to Goa and all new ships to be constructed in Goa shipyard.

    A little minor factor might be the maturity of the platform itself and major push on make in india.
     
  12. Vinod DX9

    Vinod DX9 Senior Member Senior Member

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    I heard there is going to be a parallel tank manufacturing unit along side Avadi and that can be operated by private sector (read TATA)
     
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  13. WolfPack86

    WolfPack86 Senior Member Senior Member

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    MBT ARJUN IS A FORMIDABLE TANK, BUT CAN IT REPLACE RUSSIAN MADE T-90?
    Battle tanks can be deadly war machines in certain kinds of terrains. A division of tanks can lend a powerful support to the infantry and crush the enemy defences when used in right conditions and terrain. In India's context, tank divisions are mostly used in borders areas of Rajasthan where desert poses a major challenge for other equipments to be moved into position in the event of war. Tanks are used both for offensive and defensive maneuvers of the army.

    Most of India's tank fleet comprises of Russian made T-90s which is a modern variation of the T-72B and incorporates many features found on the T-80U. The T-90M Bhishma is a vehicle tailored for Indian service, improving upon the T-90S, and developed with assistance from Russia and France. The tanks are equipped with the French Thales-built Catherine-FC thermal sights, and utilise Russian Kontakt-5 K-5 explosive reactive armoured plates.

    Our focus here is on ingenuously made Main Battle Tank Arjun. It is a state-of-the-art tank with superior firepower, high mobility, and excellent protection. The superior armour defeating capability of the ingenuously developed Fin Stabilized Armour Piercing Discarding Sabot (FSAPDS) ammunition and 120 mm caliber rifled gun give MBT ARJUN an edge over contemporary world tanks. A computer-controlled integrated fire control system incorporating day-cum-night stabilized sighting system guarantees a very high first round hit probability and reduced reaction time to bring effective fire on targets.

    The Arjun entered service with the Indian Army in 2004. The tanks were first inducted into the 43 Armoured Regiment, Indian Army Armoured Corps while the latest induction has been into the 75 Armoured Regiment on 12 March 2011.

    The reason why the Indian Army relies heavily on T-90s is because of considerable delays and other problems in Arjun's development from the 1990s to the 2000s. This prompted the Indian Army to order T-90S tanks from Russia to meet requirements that the Arjun had been expected to fulfill.

    In March and April 2010, comparative trials on the maneuverability of the Arjun MBT and the Russian T-90 tank in Rajasthan deserts resulted in a better performance from the Arjun tank.

    Arjun Vs T-90


    If we compare specifications of Arjun and T-90, then we can see that Arjun is far more heavier than T-90. But, at the same time, Arjun has a 1400 hp engine as compared to 950 hp engine of T-90, which explains why the top speed of Arjun is 72 km/h, whereas that of T-90 is 60 km/h.

    Arjun requires a crew of four to operate - commander, gunner, loader and driver. T-90 needs a crew of three to operate.
    It was also reported that T-90s have had performance issues in extremely hot weather. Recent comments from Army sources indicate that the Russian T-90S will form the mainstay of its future force, despite that tank's performance issues in hot weather.

    Although a formidable tank, Arjun (the original version) has had issues. The Arjun faced persistent problems of overheating and that "tank's main subsystems, the fire control system (FCS), the suspension system, integrated gunner's main sight, which includes a thermal imager and laser range-finder, which were rendered erratic and useless by the abnormally high peak internal temperature of beyond 55 °C in India.

    Arjun Mk II
    Recently, the Army had asked for 93 improvements in Arjun tank which includes the capability of firing the anti-tank LAHAT missile, laser protection suite and improved armoured protection for the vehicle.

    The Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) Chairman S Christopher last year said necessary modifications have been made to the advanced version of the indigenous Arjun Mark II main battle tank as recommended by the Army.

    Arjun Mark II is the modified version of Arjun. As per DRDO, Arjun Mark II can fire missiles, has advanced explosive reactive armour panels, mine plough, automatic target tracking, advanced land navigation system, digital control harness and advanced commander panoramic sight among other features.

    The Arjun Mark II is an advanced third generation tank.[citation needed] Its development was completed in 2 years owing to experience gained from developing the first version. It has outclassed the T-90 during comparative trials.

    Regarding the trials, a Ministry of Defence press release reported: "After many years of trial and tribulation it has now proved its worth by its superb performance under various circumstances, such as driving cross-country over rugged sand dunes, detecting, observing and quickly engaging targets, accurately hitting targets, both stationary and moving, with pin pointed accuracy. Its superior fire-power is based on accurate and quick target acquisition capability during day and night in all types of weather and shortest possible reaction time during combat engagements".

    The Fire control system of the new tank has a hit probability over 90%, when firing on the move. The new tank also has improved communication systems and new navigation system.

    So as of now it looks like Arjun MK 2 is the tank that the army is looking for. But, the production of tanks take time, so it may not be able to replace T-90s completely in near future. The army has shown confidence in the performance of Arjun MK 2, and will acquire more of them as they become available.
    http://www.indiandefensenews.in/2018/01/mbt-arjun-is-formidable-tank-but-can-it.html
     
  14. WolfPack86

    WolfPack86 Senior Member Senior Member

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    Indian Army may order more Arjun MK 2 tank in near future.:balleballe:
     
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  15. VIP

    VIP Ultra Nationalist Senior Member

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    Source of this awesome news please....
     
  16. WolfPack86

    WolfPack86 Senior Member Senior Member

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  17. WolfPack86

    WolfPack86 Senior Member Senior Member

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    I posted complete article above the link see.
     
  18. Blood+

    Blood+ Regular Member

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    So the rifled gun gives our Arjun an edge over other contemporary tanks according to this 'journalist', alright, then may I ask why virtually every other nations (barring UK) decided to go for smooth barrel guns for their tanks??Food for thought.

    Ps - What is so 'advanced' about the ERA tiles used in Arjun MkII??How is it any better than Russian legacy systems like Kontakt V or the Polish ERAWA (or ERA from any other nation) ??Oh and about the fit and finish of the interior, less the better.
     
  19. binayak95

    binayak95 Regular Member

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    Dude. The article is quite clearly a cut and paste job. There's a citation needed from Wikipedia!!!

    About the Rifled gun: its advantage is in its ability to fire HESH rounds. Smoothbore guns don't have that option.

    The Arjun is far more comfortable for the crew than the T-90 could ever be. This is from the IA's crews who man the tank, and Kanchan armour is superior to T-90's armour. Especially since, it defeated the best APFSDS that one can get their hands on from Israel.
     
  20. Blood+

    Blood+ Regular Member

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    You don't say.
    Yeah, the HESH round, which has become pretty much useless against almost every type of battle field structures, static or mobile, there is!!Not much of an advantage if you ask me, especially so once you take all the disadvatages that come with the rifled barrels into consideration.
    No one needs it any more anyway.So again, not much of a disadvantage.
    True that, but I never said anythging in the contradictory.
    And I never said anything about the quality of the so called Kanchan armour.And besides, the base armor of the T 90S isn't really the benchmark to weigh a certain armour type against!!
    Best in the sense against BM 42 Mango and its equivalent from Israel, which are of mid 80's vintage and again, not really the benchmark to test a particular armor against!!Frankly speaking, we have absolutely zero idea as to how good (or bad) the armor would perform against more modern APFSDS ammo like you know which ones.
     

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