11 Dead in Shooting at French Satirical Weekly's Office in Paris

Discussion in 'Europe and Russia' started by dastan, Jan 7, 2015.

  1. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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  2. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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  3. Sakal Gharelu Ustad

    Sakal Gharelu Ustad Detests Jholawalas Moderator

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  4. Singh

    Singh Phat Cat Administrator

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  5. Singh

    Singh Phat Cat Administrator

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    Re: 11 killed in Paris Shooting incident

    There are no NOGO muslim areas in Europe but there are some rough neighbourhoods where no one in there right mind should go.
     
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  6. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Veteran Member Senior Member

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    France outlines new measures to tackle terrorism



    French Prime Minister Manuel Valls has announced sweeping new measures to counter homegrown terrorism.

    The plans include giving security forces better weapons and protection, hiring more intelligence agent hiring spree and creating a better database of anyone suspected of extremist links.

    The new security measures also include increased intelligence-gathering on jihadis and other radicals, in part by making it easier to tap phones. Mr Valls said internet providers and social networks "have a legal responsibility under French law" to comply with the new measures.

    In all, France will spend 425 million euro or £325 million over the next three years for all the counter-terror efforts, he said.

    At least 2,600 counter-terrorism officers will be hired, 1,100 of them specifically for intelligence services. The Prime Minister said anti-terror surveillance is needed for 3,000 people with ties to France - some at home, others abroad.
    Last updated Wed 21 Jan 2015
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    ohkay... now we can see a protest on 'invasion of privacy' by the French againt phone tapping- though authorities will do it anyway. But a protest picnic is a must for civilized societies.
     
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  7. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Veteran Member Senior Member

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    France anti-terror plan calls for hiring more intel agents

    PARIS — Reeling from the Paris terror attacks, France announced broad new measures to fight homegrown terrorism like giving police better equipment and hiring more intelligence agents, as European officials sought to strike the right balance between rushing through tough counterterrorism laws and protecting treasured democratic rights.

    Prime Minister Manuel Valls laid out the counterterrorism initiatives just as the Paris prosecutor announced preliminary charges against four men for allegedly providing logistical support to one of the attackers behind a three-day spree of violence this month that killed 17 people before the three gunmen were shot dead by police.

    France plans to spend 425 million euros ($490 million) over the next three years for the new measures. They include leaning on Internet companies and social media to help in the fight, creating an improved database of suspected extremists, and increasing intelligence-gathering on jihadis and other radicals — in part by making it easier to tap phones. About 2,600 counter-terrorism officers will be hired, 1,100 of them specifically for intelligence services.

    Meanwhile, at the European Union headquarters in Brussels, new efforts are being made to overcome privacy objections and make the sharing of air passenger information easier. But continental leaders warned also about going too far, at the risk of undermining individual rights that are a cornerstone of the European way of life.

    "The last thing" is for Europeans "to change the nature of our open societies as a reaction to this threat. Because then, we would play into the hands of these terrorists," EU Vice President Frans Timmermans said.

    Some calls have emerged for a European equivalent of the U.S. Patriot Act, which was passed within weeks of the Sept. 11 attacks, to strengthen the hand of authorities to prevent terrorism. Some of its components were controversial — like the unprecedented authority to search, seize, detain or eavesdrop in pursuit of suspected terrorists.

    "That is not the way to go," Sophie In't Veld, a leading Liberal civil rights lawmaker at the European Parliament, told The Associated Press. "We should use more than two weeks to think about this, instead of rushing things through."

    Isabelle Falque-Pierrotin, head of France's national data protection agency CNIL, told reporters her agency would insist that any additional snooping privileges for France's intelligence services should only be allowed if they are matched by greater protections for personal data.

    France has repeatedly strengthened its counterterrorism laws over the years, including a measure passed in November that focused on preventing extremists from joining fighters abroad. One measure, set to be activated in the coming weeks, would allow authorities to ask Internet service providers to block sites that glorify terrorism.

    Despite rights concerns, the EU feels it can move forward on several fronts and the first stop is airports.

    Up to three new measures to better screen and detect suspect electronic devices carried onto flights are in the pipeline, said an official involved in drawing up the EU's new security strategy. He wasn't allowed to speak publicly about the process and wouldn't elaborate on the measures.

    Authorities across the continent are concerned about more than 3,000 Europeans who have traveled to fight in Syria and Iraq, and have noted the difficulty in tracking them.
    The three gunmen in the Paris attacks claimed allegiance to the Islamic State group and al-Qaida in Yemen.

    More than 1,200 French citizens and residents are now linked to foreign jihad, French officials say. Defense Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian said Wednesday about 10 former French soldiers are among those who have gone to Syria or Iraq to fight with Islamic extremists, but insisted the phenomenon remains an "extreme rarity."

    EU countries are pushing for a quick agreement on the sharing sensitive air passenger information. The bloc has passenger name record, or PNR, agreements with the U.S., Canada and Australia but has been unable to agree on one among its own 28 members.

    The EU system would oblige airlines to provide the authorities with data on people entering or leaving the bloc, vital to tracing foreign fighters. Privacy concerns have stalled the legislation in the European Parliament. In frustration, some EU states have decided to go it alone with their own PNR-like systems and interconnect them with other partners.

    On the ground, experts are looking at ways to check travel documents at the EU's borders to the outside world without stopping everybody. By law, only random checks are permitted to ensure that people do not pose a "genuine, present and sufficiently serious threat."

    To be more present in the region, the EU aims to send security attaches to countries like Egypt and Yemen, and wants to help build the counter-terror capacity of countries in the Middle East, the Gulf and North Africa.

    Recently France and Belgium have deployed soldiers in the streets, particularly around public buildings, but defending soft targets like supermarkets or sports events is the big challenge. French President Francois Hollande's office announced Wednesday that the government now plans to cut 7,500 fewer jobs from the military, to better fight terrorism.

    Another major concern is private security guards. About 2.5 million work in Europe — five times the number of police. But their quality can differ greatly, and security companies compete heavily on prices. The EU will soon propose common standards to recruit, train and vet the private guards.

    Some nations, like France, are even considering taking passports away from suspects because it is almost impossible to establish whether they might be joining the free Syrian rebels or IS.

    Outlining a web of phone calls, shared keys and prison friendships, Paris Prosecutor Francois Molins announced Wednesday that the four suspects given preliminary charges overnight will remain behind bars while the investigation continues into the deadly Jan. 7-9 attacks on staff at the Charlie Hebdo satirical newspaper, a lone policewoman and at a kosher grocery. The gunmen, brothers Cherif and Said Kouachi and their friend, Amedy Coulibaly, died in standoffs with police.

    All of the suspects, who are aged in their 20s, were arrested in the Paris region, Molins said. He identified them only as Willy P., Christophe R., Tonino G. and Mickael A. If convicted on the preliminary charges of criminal association with a terrorist organization, they could face up to 20 years in prison under French law.

    Read more here: http://www.islandpacket.com/2015/01...sues-first-charges-against.html#storylink=cpy
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2015
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  8. cobra commando

    cobra commando Tharki regiment Veteran Member Senior Member

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    Karachi Anti-Charlie Protests Rage Again, Demand Action Against France

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    MOSCOW, January 22 (Sputnik) – Thousands marched through Karachi, Pakistan's largest city, against Charlie Hebdo for publishing cartoons of Muhammad, AFP reported. "Down with Charlie Hebdo! Down with the blasphemers!" the protesters chanted, according to RFI. The rally was led by Sarwat Ejaz Qadri, head of the Pakistani Sufi Muslim organization Sunni Tehreek, together with local politicians from Islamist parties, according to the Pakistani Herald. According to RFI, although the organization is opposed to the Taliban, they are vocal on issues such as blasphemy The protestors demanded that the Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC) and the United Nations (UN) act against what they consider a blasphemous publication, according to the Pakistan Herald.
    The protest's leader, Sarwat Ejaz Qadri, also demanded that Pakistan cut diplomatic ties with France, as protesters burned a French flag, according to AFP. A rally against Charlie Hebdo in Karachi turned violent last Friday, when an AFP photographer was shot by one of the protesters, and police used tear gas and water cannons to disperse the protest. Rallies protesting against the cartoons were also held in the former French colonies of Niger, Mali, Senegal, Mauritania and Algeria. In Niger, ten people were killed during violent protests on Friday and Sunday.

    Karachi Anti-Charlie Protests Rage Again, Demand Action Against France / Sputnik International
     
  9. cobra commando

    cobra commando Tharki regiment Veteran Member Senior Member

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  10. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Veteran Member Senior Member

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    Australia's Ambivalence Toward Muslims

    As Australia moves toward the 100th anniversary of its most “sacred” national day, the commemoration of the failed Gallipoli campaign in Turkey in 1915, it is struggling to come to terms with its Muslim community and where they fit in the national self-images of war and peace. On the one hand, several Australians have figured prominently as participants and even leaders in the military campaign of Islamic State in Iraq and Syria. On the other hand, on December 15 last year, a recidivist criminal taking on the mantle of Islamist terrorist took hostages in a central Sydney siege, leading to the deaths of two of them. Australia had seen terrorist-related bombings but this was the first terrorist incident in Australia involving hostages and their death.

    The political context of this has at least two parts. The first is Australian military participation in the operations in Iraq against Islamic State under the leadership of the United States and on the invitation of the government of Iraq. The second is cultural revolt in Australia against people who are portrayed by some as looking and acting so differently from the traditional national self–image. This latter dimension was illustrated most negatively in 2014 when the speaker of the House of Representatives, Bronwyn Bishop, sought to segregate people wearing burqa or niqab in the public gallery of the parliament in an area behind a transparent glass security screen. The move was overturned after intervention by Prime Minister Tony Abbott.

    In Australia, people identifying as members of the Islamic faith constitute about 2 per cent of the population, which is more than the Jewish population, but less than the populations of Christians (61 per cent), atheists (22 per cent), and Buddhists (2.5 per cent). Several leading Australian sports figures, such as aboriginal boxer Tony Mundine, have converted to Islam (following the example of American boxer Muhammad Ali).

    Australia’s political leaders and media commentators, very few of whom know anything meaningful about Islam, terrorism or the Middle East, are struggling to come to terms with the presence of Muslims in their community. The father of Joe Hockey, the current federal treasurer of Australia, was born in Bethlehem, with some Palestinian and Armenian lineage. Hockey made a celebrated speech in 2009 in which he said: “Australia has embraced religious diversity. It must always remain so, and as a member of parliament I am a custodian of that principle of tolerance. That is why it is disturbing to hear people rail against Muslims and Jews, or Pentecostals and Catholics.”

    A January 21 headline in The Australian, one of the country’s leading broadsheet dailies, read, “Debate Islam’s Place in the West Now.” Both the headline and the accompanying commentary reveal a high level of ignorance of just how much the issue has already been debated and equal ignorance of the unjustified discrimination that Australian Muslims regularly suffer. This article actually cited in positive terms a statement by Egypt’s (elected) dictator, Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, whose regime has undertaken unspeakable crimes of repression and massive human rights abuses, including of Australian journalist Peter Greste.

    Muslim organizations in Australia cite as an example of discrimination a new law that criminalizes travel to designated zones (mostly intended to be in Muslim countries) as a means of stopping Australian Muslims from going to fight in Syria and Iraq, and providing for incarceration of returnees where evidence of their direct involvement in the fighting or in a terrorist organization may be hard to establish by normal evidentiary standards in court. Under amendments made in 2014 to the Criminal Code Act 1995, notably section 119, the Australian parliament made it an offense, punishable by ten years in jail, for Australians (citizens, residents and certain visa holders) to enter an area that has been declared by the Foreign Minister to be an area where “a listed terrorist organization is engaging in a hostile activity.” While the provisions do not identify Muslims in particular, the only zone so declared so far is in Syria (Al Raqqah province). There has been little talk of making such declarations for localities in non-Muslim countries where terrorist organizations are known to be based.

    The Australian National Imams Council has reacted strongly to these provisions, which place a burden of proof on the traveler. In a statement issued in October 2014, the Council said it “supports the concern of academics and community groups in Australia that the new travel offenses contained in the Bill are extreme and unnecessarily burdens people who may need to visit designated areas for innocent reasons such as religious pilgrimage. :pound:
    We recommend that the declared area provision be removed or alternatively amended to include as part of the offense a specific illegitimate purpose for being in the area rather than the traveler being required to provide a legitimate defense.”

    The Australian law can be legitimated in part by the U.N. Security Council Resolution 2178 on September 24, 2014 that called on member states to prevent travel for terrorism purposes
    , but the provisions of this law go further than those envisaged by the resolution.

    Most Australians have yet to make a connection between their sacred Anzac Day commemorating the 1915 landing in Gallipoli by the British Empire Forces, including the Australia and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC), with the fact that their enemies then were Muslims. One can only hope that the new Russell Crowe movie The Water Diviner, where a prototypical Aussie male falls in love with a Muslim woman in a plot directly linked to the Gallipoli campaign, will help shift some of the Australian atavism toward Muslims.

    Australia’s Ambivalence Toward Muslims | The Diplomat
     
  11. Redhawk

    Redhawk Regular Member

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    Most Australians are not ambivalent about Moslems. They are seen as a foreign and alien presence on our soil. Full stop! Deal with it, multiculturalists!
     
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  12. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Then it is time for you to take some remedial steps.

    I am sure you are not hamstrung by votebank politics like the UK.

    What actions are being taken?

    What is being done to assimilate them into the Australian ethos and away from radicalism?
     
  13. Redhawk

    Redhawk Regular Member

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    Quite right! Moslems ought not to take this from the arrogant West. I'd pack up and go and live in a Moslem country if I were them! Why live in the arrogant West when they can live in a beautiful, peaceful Moslem country!
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2015
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  14. The Germans are coming

    The Germans are coming Regular Member

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  15. Redhawk

    Redhawk Regular Member

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    And what "remedial steps" would you suggest, Ray?

    We don't want them in Australian society! Full stop! We want them to pack up and go away. Failing that, I am hoping for a government that will intern Moslems, strip them of their Australian citizenship, and deport them to a faraway place, like Somalia or Iraq. They cannot be assimilated into Australian society. They are the adherents of a barbarous religion which is inherently anti-Western civilisation. Islam is an inherently radical or militant religion, call it what you like, that is inherently inimical to the Western way of life. Full stop! Moslem immigration in Australia should never have been allowed to proceed.

    If India could not assimilate scores of millions of Moslems in India after centuries and that is why Pakistan was created, what chance does Australia have after a few decades? Get real! Assimilation of Moslems in Australian society is not going to happen in a thousand years, if the country lasts that long.
     
  16. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    Why can't west be peaceful and give parts of their country?(sarcasm)
     
  17. ezsasa

    ezsasa Senior Member Veteran Member Senior Member

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    Sorry to butt in your conversation with @Ray

    Would like to point out a correction in your assumption, majority of Muslims have integrated in a good way into indian society. Our contention is only with those Muslims who put religion before the country there by leaning towards anti-nationalistic sentiments. As a example I had a Muslim friend in school who was last of three sons. His mother prepared him early from childhood that he is born to serve the nation. First son was meant for looking after their family business, second son was designated to be educated, third for our armed forces. I think we were 15/16 at that time and this guy would jump from building to building four floors up I.e 50 foot drop.

    Those muslims who have integrated well into indian society cannot be distinguished in our general life unless they tell you their name. They are doing well for themselves. Only those who have come into the trap of secular politics are an issue. I hope the negative comments you hear on this forum are meant for Muslims with anti-nationalistic tendencies and not the indian Muslim community as a whole.
     
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  18. Redhawk

    Redhawk Regular Member

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    O.k. I can dig it. There's a difference between Indian Moslems and Pakistanis. O.k. that still leaves about 180 million Moslems in Pakistan and about 176 million Moslems in India, according to Google. So between the Moslems in India and in Pakistan there isn't much between them. So yeah, a lot of those Moslems in India are loyal Indians. That's good. But they are also ethnic Indians or members of ethnic groups that have been in India for centuries.

    Moslems in Australia are not ethnically Australians; they are foreign ethnic groups introduced into Australia and ethnically different from the host population. That's bad.

    As I have said several times on this forum, most Moslems are Arabs and those Arab Moslems that were born in Australia identify themselves this way: No. 1 they identify as Moslems, not an ethnic group, but a religious group that identifies with non-European/non-Western peoples, so they are making a statement about their ethnicity by identifying themselves as Moslems; No. 2 they identify as Arabs, their main ethnic group or race; No. 3 they identify with the nationality of their parents or of their forebears/ancestors, that is they identify as an Arab nationality, e.g. Lebanese, Iraqi, Egyptian, Palestinian, etc.; then at No. 4 they might, and I stress might, identify as Australian if they were born in the country, but this is unlikely as it is so far down on the list that it hardly matters, to either them or us.

    So you see, they themselves and we ourselves don't really consider them Australians: if they as Moslems don't consider themselves Australians, why should we?

    The ball is in their court, not ours. Game, set, and match.
     
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  19. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    @Redhawk

    Just curious How do other minorities mostly Asians identify themselves in Australia?
     
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  20. Redhawk

    Redhawk Regular Member

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    Good question.

    It depends on the original nationality and ethnicity of the person concerned. For example, some young Chinese will identify themselves as ABCs: Australian-born Chinese. Many ethnic Chinese whose families have been in Australia five or six generations will identify themselves first and foremost as Chinese. Some members of these older Chinese-Australian families will identify as, for example, a fourth-generation-Australian-born Chinese. Many will identify as Chinese-Australian or, conversely, Australian-Chinese. Some, a minority, will identify as Australians, first and foremost, of Han Chinese descent. The Chinese are very ethnocentric and are a good example as they are an old non-European community.

    If I wanted to put my ethnic group forward first in the manner of many Chinese I would identify myself as a fifth-generation-Australian-born Anglo-Saxon, taking Anglo-Saxon in its true and full meaning of being English or of English descent, not just of Northern European descent as it is erroneously used in America. But identifying myself this way would be, rather stupidly, considered racist in some circles in this country.

    Other ethnic minorities I shall discuss later, but right now I must retire for the night as it is dreadfully late and in the small hours of the morning. Good night! And have a great Republic Day for 26 Jan.!
     
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