Your iPhone Was Built,In Part,By 13 Year-Olds Working 16 Hrs A Day For 70 Cents An Hr

Discussion in 'China' started by ash2win, Jan 17, 2012.

  1. ash2win

    ash2win Regular Member

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    We love our iPhones and iPads.
    We love the prices of our iPhones and iPads.
    We love the super-high profit margins of Apple, Inc., the maker of our iPhones and iPads.
    And that's why it's disconcerting to remember that the low prices of our iPhones and iPads — and the super-high profit margins of Apple — are only possible because our iPhones and iPads are made with labor practices that would be illegal in the United States.
    And it's also disconcerting to realize that the folks who make our iPhones and iPads not only don't have iPhones and iPads (because they can't afford them), but, in some cases, have never even seen them.
    This is a complex issue. But it's also an important one. And it's only going to get more important as the world's economies continue to become more intertwined.
    (And the issue obviously concerns a lot more companies than Apple. Almost all of the major electronics manufacturers make their stuff in China. One difference with Apple, though, is the magnitude of the company's profit margin and profits. Apple could afford to pay its manufacturers more or hold them to higher standards and still be extremely competitive and profitable.)
    Last week, PRI's "This American Life" did a special on Apple's manufacturing. The show featured (among others) the reporting of Mike Daisey, the man who does the one-man stage show "The Agony and the Ecstasy of Steve Jobs," and The NYT's Nicholas Kristof, whose wife's family is from China.
    You can read a transcript of the whole show here. Here are some details:
    The Chinese city of Shenzhen is where most of our "crap" is made. 30 years ago, Shenzhen was a little village on a river. Now it's a city of 13 million people — bigger than New York.
    Foxconn, one of the companies that builds iPhones and iPads (and products for many other electronics companies), has a factory in Shenzhen that employs 430,000 people.
    There are 20 cafeterias at the Foxconn Shenzhen plant. They each serve 10,000 people.
    One Foxconn worker Mike Daisey interviewed, outside factory gates manned by guards with guns, was a 13-year old girl. She polished the glass of thousands of new iPhones a day.
    The 13-year old said Foxconn doesn't really check ages
    . There are on-site inspections, from time to time, but Foxconn always knows when they're happening. And before the inspectors arrive, Foxconn just replaces the young-looking workers with older ones.
    In the first two hours outside the factory gates, Daisey meets workers who say they are 14, 13, and 12 years old (along with plenty of older ones). Daisey estimates that about 5% of the workers he talked to were underage.

    Daisey assumes that Apple, obsessed as it is with details, must know this. Or, if they don't, it's because they don't want to know.
    Daisey visits other Shenzhen factories, posing as a potential customer. He discovers that most of the factory floors are vast rooms filled with 20,000-30,000 workers apiece. The rooms are quiet: There's no machinery, and there's no talking allowed. When labor costs so little, there's no reason to build anything other than by hand.
    A Chinese working "hour" is 60 minutes — unlike an American "hour," which generally includes breaks for Facebook, the bathroom, a phone call, and some conversation. The official work day in China is 8 hours long, but the standard shift is 12 hours. Generally, these shifts extend to 14-16 hours, especially when there's a hot new gadget to build. While Daisey is in Shenzhen, a Foxconn worker dies after working a 34-hour shift.
    Assembly lines can only move as fast as their slowest worker, so all the workers are watched (with cameras). Most people stand.

    The workers stay in dormitories. In a 12-by-12 cement cube of a room, Daisey counts 15 beds, stacked like drawers up to the ceiling. Normal-sized Americans would not fit in them.
    Unions are illegal in China. Anyone found trying to unionize is sent to prison.
    Daisey interviews dozens of (former) workers who are secretly supporting a union. One group talked about using "hexane," an iPhone screen cleaner. Hexane evaporates faster than other screen cleaners, which allows the production line to go faster. Hexane is also a neuro-toxin. The hands of the workers who tell him about it shake uncontrollably.
    Some workers can no longer work because their hands have been destroyed by doing the same thing hundreds of thousands of times over many years (mega-carpal-tunnel). This could have been avoided if the workers had merely shifted jobs. Once the workers' hands no longer work, obviously, they're canned.
    One former worker had asked her company to pay her overtime, and when her company refused, she went to the labor board. The labor board put her on a black list that was circulated to every company in the area. The workers on the black list are branded "troublemakers" and companies won't hire them.
    One man got his hand crushed in a metal press at Foxconn. Foxconn did not give him medical attention. When the man's hand healed, it no longer worked. So they fired him. (Fortunately, the man was able to get a new job, at a wood-working plant. The hours are much better there, he says — only 70 hours a week).
    The man, by the way, made the metal casings of iPads at Foxconn. Daisey showed him his iPad. The man had never seen one before. He held it and played with it. He said it was "magic."
    Importantly, Shenzhen's factories, as hellish as they are, have been a boon to the people of China. Liberal economist Paul Krugman says so. NYT columnist Nicholas Kristof says so. Kristof's wife's ancestors are from a village near Shenzhen. So he knows of what he speaks. The "grimness" of the factories, Kristof says, is actually better than the "grimness" of the rice paddies.
    So, looked at that way, Apple is helping funnel money from rich American and European consumers to poor workers in China. Without Foxconn and other assembly plants, Chinese workers might still be working in rice paddies, making $50 a month instead of $250 a month (Kristof's estimates. In 2010, Reuters says, Foxconn workers were given a raise to $298 per month, or $10 a day, or less than $1 an hour). With this money, they're doing considerably better than they once were. Especially women, who had few other alternatives.
    But, of course, the reason Apple assembles iPhones and iPads in China instead of America, is that assembling them here or Europe would cost much, much more — even with shipping and transportation. And it would cost much, much more because, in the United States and Europe, we have established minimum acceptable standards for the treatment and pay of workers like those who build the iPhones and iPads.

    Foxconn, needless to say, doesn't come anywhere near meeting these minimum standards.
    If Apple decided to build iPhones and iPads for Americans using American labor rules, two things would likely happen:
    The prices of iPhones and iPads would go up
    Apple's profit margins would go down
    Neither of those things would be good for American consumers or Apple shareholders. But they might not be all that awful, either. Unlike some electronics manufacturers, Apple's profit margins are so high that they could go down a lot and still be high. And some Americans would presumably feel better about loving their iPhones and iPads if they knew that the products had been built using American labor rules.
    In other words, Apple could probably afford to use American labor rules when building iPhones and iPads without destroying its business.
    So it seems reasonable to ask why Apple is choosing NOT to do that.
    (Not that Apple is the only company choosing to avoid American labor rules and costs, of course — almost all manufacturing companies that want to survive, let alone thrive, have to reduce production costs and standards by making their products elsewhere.)
    The bottom line is that iPhones and iPads cost what they do because they are built using labor practices that would be illegal in this country — because people in this country consider those practices grossly unfair.
    That's not a value judgment. It's a fact.
    So, next time you pick up your iPhone or iPad, ask yourself how you feel about that.


    Your iPhone Was Built, In Part, By 13 Year-Olds Working 16 Hours A Day For 70 Cents An Hour

    The Shocking Conditions Inside China's Brutal Foxconn Factory
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2012
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  3. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Its normal in China. Why the hell do u think, companies around the world goes to china ?? ......
     
  4. The Messiah

    The Messiah Bow Before Me! Elite Member

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    chinis was unfair advantage in laws and lack of labour rights and thats why they are able to produce cheaper products.
     
  5. tiranga

    tiranga Tihar Jail Banned

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    Just wish something similar happens in India...
     
  6. ice berg

    ice berg Senior Member Senior Member

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    If unfair advantage in laws(what ever that means) and lack of labour rights is all that takes to produce cheap products then Somalia should be worlds number one producer.
     
  7. utubekhiladi

    utubekhiladi The Preacher Elite Member

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    thank god, i am not iphone user... this is one of the reason why i hate apple.
     
    balai_c and The Messiah like this.
  8. ash2win

    ash2win Regular Member

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    What do u mean?!
     
  9. Galaxy

    Galaxy Elite Member Elite Member

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    Somalia doesn't have organised regime like CPC and population is only 9.3 Million. (not even 1% of China).

    West + Eastern countries like Japan, S.K., Taiwan opted China as it's big country with huge population. No Ethics, No moral value. Only Business with no protocol and cheap input cost !!
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2012
    Nagraj likes this.
  10. ash2win

    ash2win Regular Member

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    Someone pls post this to def.pk. They talk too much about Chinese goods :frusty:
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2012
  11. ice berg

    ice berg Senior Member Senior Member

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    What does population got to do with this? Check what I replied to.
    Dont jump into an argument without knowing the subject.

    A country with no ethics and moral values is one of the oldest civilization in the world? Must be nice living in your bubble world.

    Try stick to topic.
     
  12. Galaxy

    Galaxy Elite Member Elite Member

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    You bought Somalia.

    There are 100+ millions Chinese working in various manufacturing unit. which is 2nd country which can provide so much cheap human resources with no rules and regulation ?? India is democratic country and not ruled by any dictator. There is no other option beside China.

    :nono: Not oldest civilization. Say it "One of the oldest civilization"

    BTW, Civilization has nothing to do with Moral and Ethics otherwise Tibet won't be part of China.

    All are related with topic only.
     
  13. ice berg

    ice berg Senior Member Senior Member

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    And I repeat, the number of people in a country got nothing to do with it. No matter if it is 10 millions or 100 millions. Look what I replied to.

    You must living in a bubble world. Child labour is known across India. I see no need to bring it up. But try to get down from your high horse.
    It is wrong no matter which country who practices it.

    Civilizations got nothing to do with moral and ethics? Thanks for a good laugh.

    Ignorance is a bliss. :lol:
     
  14. ash2win

    ash2win Regular Member

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    Remember,when you decide to stop using iphone/ipad you might have put some poor 13 year old Chinese girl out of work.!! #WiredThought :scared2:
     
  15. Galaxy

    Galaxy Elite Member Elite Member

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    ^^^^

    Do Chinese follow Ancient Chinese civilization ? They are doing opposite in killing innocent Tibetans and Uighur people. Anyway, Off topic.

    On topic- Many countries needed huge amount of human resources in 80's and 90's. China was only option at that time. So, They opted. China population is much more than whole Africa combined. So, It was relatively easy to target 1 country i.e. China for various manufacturing requirement. Also, It's nearby developed nations like Japan, S.K., Taiwan and even ASEAN are not so far. If one see, Most of the industries are based at east coast which makes easy for transportation too.

    We also have many problems like child labor but at least we have law which will not allow any foreign manufacturing unit to hire 5,00,000 people in which many will be under 15 and work 12-16 hours an day. All NGO's and News agency will ask for ban in that case. In China, Nothing called Human rights NGO or independent News agency. Hu JIntao can do anything he wants after all he is dictator.
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2012
  16. ash2win

    ash2win Regular Member

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    The other side of the story - http://m.techcrunch.com/tag/foxconn/

    Foxconn manufactures consumer electronics for a number of well-known companies, including:
    Acer Inc.
    Amazon.com
    Apple Inc.
    ASRock
    Asus
    Barnes & Noble
    Cisco
    Dell
    EVGA Corporation
    Hewlett-Packcard
    Intel
    IBM
    Lenovo
    Logitech
    Microsoft
    MSI
    Motorola
    Netgear
    Nintendo
    Nokia
    Panasonic
    Philips
    Samsung
    Sharp
    Sony Ericsson
    Toshiba
    Vizio
     
  17. ash2win

    ash2win Regular Member

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    The other side of the story - http://m.techcrunch.com/tag/foxconn/

    Foxconn manufactures consumer electronics for a number of well-known companies, including:
    Acer Inc.
    Amazon.com
    Apple Inc.
    ASRock
    Asus
    Barnes & Noble
    Cisco
    Dell
    EVGA Corporation
    Hewlett-Packcard
    Intel
    IBM
    Lenovo
    Logitech
    Microsoft
    MSI
    Motorola
    Netgear
    Nintendo
    Nokia
    Panasonic
    Philips
    Samsung
    Sharp
    Sony Ericsson
    Toshiba
    Vizio
     
  18. sob

    sob Moderator Moderator

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    No matter what you buy you are scrwd by this Chinese company
     
  19. utubekhiladi

    utubekhiladi The Preacher Elite Member

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  20. mki

    mki Regular Member

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    Thts why i always see the bottom of the product, where it is made...
    If it is made in china i dont buy it.
    because either it is unreliable or as we read, made by some innocent's blood.



    My Chines friend dont tell me all the products are made in china... may be you are right but there are other manufacturing facilities around the world, definitely you need to spend more to by same product, or have to import it from other part of the world.
    and yes i know that, i shouldnt be stereotype for all Chines company, but your great govt (oldest civilization's govt) who dont give basic freedom rights to there people, makes me believe that all the chines products are indirectly or directly an inhuman manufacturing facility.
     
  21. niceguy2011

    niceguy2011 Tihar Jail Banned

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    Check the bottom of your laptop.

     

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