Young Indian in MIT young innovator list

Discussion in 'Politics & Society' started by Tamil Arasan, Jan 11, 2012.

  1. Tamil Arasan

    Tamil Arasan Regular Member

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    It's sad that our media give so much important on negative news or unwanted news on movie stars and ignore or omit news which is really important for the young Indians to know, below is one such news ignored by our useless media...

    TR35: Ajit Narayanan, 30 - Technology Review
    Ajit Narayanan, 30

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    Affordable speech synthesizers
    Invention Labs

    Some four million people in India suffer from cerebral palsy and other disabilities that make it difficult or impossible for them to speak. Giving them a voice is the job of Ajit Narayanan's low-cost tablet-based system, Avaz. Even someone with only limited movement control can use Avaz to construct phrases that are spoken out loud by an artificial voice.
    Speech synthesizers have long been used in the West (perhaps most famously by Stephen Hawking), but they are prohibitively expensive to all but the richest in India. Narayanan's Invention Labs, based in Chennai, designed Avaz to be not only cheap but also capable of supporting multiple languages. "The average young person in India speaks and uses three different languages every day," Narayanan points out. By working directly with Asian hardware manufacturers, he has been able to bring the cost of an Avaz down to around $800, compared with $5,000 to $10,000 for a single-censoredlanguage device in the United States.
    Just over 100 of the devices have been sold so far, mainly to specialist schools, and they are in use by around 500 children. "I've seen parents weep when Avaz allows them to talk with their [child] for the first time," says Narayanan. He is currently working with the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, to improve the quality of the speech synthesis, and he also plans to use mobile app stores to distribute a version of his software with about 90 percent of the full Avaz system's functionality. —Tom Simonite

     
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  3. Tamil Arasan

    Tamil Arasan Regular Member

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    Bhaskar Krishnamachari, 33

    Smarter wireless networks
    University of Southern California

    http://www.technologyreview.com/tr35/profile.aspx?trid=1096&mod=tr35_riverofnames


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    By creating smarter wireless networks that can handle mobile devices and interference more efficiently than today's Wi-Fi and cellular networks, Bhaskar Krishnamachari aims to ease the increasing digital congestion of the airwaves and open the door to new applications for wireless communications.
    For example, censoredKrishnamachari is working with General Motors on a vehicle-to-vehicle network that lets cars in motion swap information about traffic flow and road conditions. His design can reliably route data within a shifting network of cars and other vehicles across freeways and city streets without having to tax the congested cellular network. One key to his approach is that data is not directed to specific addresses, as is standard in many computer networks. Instead, packets of data are labeled with tags that describe things such as the packet's contents, the geographic area the information is relevant to, and the time when the data should be considered out of date. Data is passed along the fleeting connections as needed and soon discarded. "This is opening up additional, almost free, bandwidth," he says. —Tom Simonite





     
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  4. Tamil Arasan

    Tamil Arasan Regular Member

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    Aishwarya Ratan, 30

    Converting paper records to digital in real time

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    TR35: Aishwarya Ratan, 30 - Technology Review

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    Paper trail: Designed to help rural microcredit lenders keep better records, this slate digitizes entries as they are handwritten in a ledger, then displays and speaks the recorded amounts.
    Credit: Aishwarya Lakshmi Ratan, Sunandan Chakraborty


    Beginning in 2009, while working with Microsoft Research India, Aishwarya Ratan spent 15 months figuring out how to help local microcredit co-ops, which often struggle with handwritten entries that are illegible, incorrect, or incomplete. Her solution combines digital technology with the familiar paper notebooks that villagers prefer. Co-op members use an electronic ballpoint pen to write in ledgers placed on a slate equipped with software that recognizes handwritten numbers. The slate provides feedback on whether the records are complete and legible, stores them in a database, and gives real-time balance updates, both on a screen and verbally in the local language. The database can be shared with the nongovernmental organizations and banks that back each co-op.
    In field tests, the hybrid slate yielded entries that were 100 percent complete and made record keeping faster while letting co-op members retain the paper records they are comfortable with. The potential of the system is tremendous: microfinance co-ops serve 86 million Indian households. High-censoredquality record keeping could make them more efficient, helping members save more and repay faster, and it could allow the co-ops to borrow more easily from banks.
    In June, Ratan became the director of the Microsavings and Payments Innovation Initiative at Yale University, which as part of its mission studies how technologies can help the poor financially. Meanwhile, the NGO that Ratan was partnering with continues to test the slate in villages. —Prachi Patel

     
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