World's tallest dam approved by Chinese environmental officials

Discussion in 'China' started by drkrn, May 17, 2013.

  1. drkrn

    drkrn Senior Member Senior Member

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    Chinese environmental authorities have approved construction plans for what could become the world's tallest dam, while acknowledging that the project would affect endangered plants and rare fish species.

    The 314 metre-high dam (1,030ft) will serve the Shuangjiangkou hydropower project along the Dadu river in south-western Sichuan province, according to China's state news agency, Xinhua. A subsidiary of Guodian Group, one of China's five major state-owned power companies, will complete the project over a decade at an estimated cost of £2.9bn.

    The dam will be far taller than the 185 metre-high Three Gorges dam along the Yangtze river – the world's most powerful hydroelectric project – and slightly edge out the current record holder, the 300 metre-high Nurek dam in Tajikistan. The world's second-tallest dam, the 292 metre-high Xiaowan dam on the Lancang (Mekong) river, is also in China.

    China's environment ministry acknowledged that the dam would have an impact on the area's highly biodiverse flora and fauna.

    "The project will affect the spawning and movement of rare fish species, as well as the growth of endangered plants, including the Chinese yew, which is under first-class state protection," the ministry said, according to Xinhua.

    The ministry proposed counter-measures to mitigate the environmental impact, such as "protecting fish habitats in tributaries, building fish ladders and increasing fish breeding and releasing", Xinhua reported. The project is still awaiting a final go-ahead from China's state council.

    The Dadu river is a tributary of the 450 mile-long Min river, which cuts through the centre of Sichuan province before joining the Yangtze further south.

    Upon completion, the plant will have a total installed capacity of 2GW and produce nearly 8bn KW-hours of energy a year, about twice as much as the Hoover dam in the US.

    China's hydropower development has surged in recent years as the country moves to increase non-fossil energy sources to 15% of its total energy use by 2020. Central authorities approved a controversial cascade of 13 dams on the pristine upper reaches of the Nu (Salween) river in January. The plans had stalled nearly a decade ago under pressure from environmental groups.

    Scientists and environmental activists have raised concerns that a profusion of dams in south-west China could increase the area's risk of natural disasters, such as earthquakes and landslides.

    Another hydroelectric project on the Dadu river prompted social unrest in 2004, as tens of thousands of farmers along its banks rioted against plans to relocate them. Authorities responded by halting the Pubugou dam's construction for a year.


    World's tallest dam approved by Chinese environmental officials | Environment | guardian.co.uk
     
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  3. huaxia rox

    huaxia rox Senior Member Senior Member

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    no one should care about the 'endangered plants and rare fish species' when human beings our self have no enough water to drink and use.

    the quality of our peoples life should always come first.
     
  4. drkrn

    drkrn Senior Member Senior Member

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    if your statement is taken into consideration then humans will be the only species left.we should never undermine any living creature because they cant resist
     
  5. no smoking

    no smoking Senior Member Senior Member

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    That scenario is still better than human beings killing each other.
     
  6. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Only a materialist would be impervious to environmental disasters.

    Sichuan is earthquake prone and the dams are adding to the problem.

    Even the official Chinese agencies accept that.

    Sichuan quakes linked to China’s frenetic hydropower program
    The massive hydroelectric dam building program in Southwest China may have a causal link to the magnitude-7 earthquake that rocked Lushan, in China’s Sichuan province on Saturday, killing 179 and leaving thousands injured and homeless.

    The April 20 earthquake occurred along the same Longmenshan Fault Belt as the magnitude-8 tremor that killed more than 80,000 people in Sichuan five years ago. According to Fan Xiao, a geologist and chief engineer of the Regional Geological Survey Team of the Sichuan Geology and Mineral Bureau, the latest quake is likely to have been part of a stress adjustment process, making the region more dangerous after the Wenchuan quake.

    Last year Fan wrote a report on the Wenchuan earthquake, published by Probe International, which found a “mounting body of evidence and analysis indicates that the magnitude-8 earthquake was triggered by the mass loading and increased pore pressure caused by the Zipingpu reservoir.” He says Southwest China has been made more dangerous by the government’s frenetic dam-building along the great rivers of Sichuan-Yunnan in actively seismic zones.

    According to the Sichuan branch of the China Earthquake Administration, an analysis of 1,832 small-scale earthquakes from October 2006 to December 2011 found a concentrated pattern around the region’s dams. All the more reason, says Fan that “studies be done to determine the extent to which the filling and drawdown of Zipingpu’s reservoir has had an impact on the stress adjustment and seismic activity of the Longmenshan Fault Zone in general, and on the latest Lushan earthquake in particular.”
    Sichuan quakes linked to China’s frenetic hydropower program | News on environment, business sustainability and cleantech in Asia
     
  7. huaxia rox

    huaxia rox Senior Member Senior Member

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    sichuan is a place that is a bit like japan or iran when it comes to the frequences of earthquake. so earthquakes may be in fact inevitable.

    maybe we can see an interesting story about an area in india where it used to be immunie to earthquakes.
    'Tremors were due to Koyna river fault' - Times Of India
    The moderately strong earthquake of magnitude 5.1 that occurred on March 14 was epicentred at around Koyna in Maharashtra, according to the India Meteorology Department at Colaba.

    Earthquakes in the Koyna region: This area has been witnessing a large number of tremors of low magnitude consistently for over a quarter of a century since the first quake appeared in 1968.

    It took everyone by surprise because the Indian peninsular region was considered quite stable and immune to earthquakes until then. In an attempt to find out why the quake occurred where it did, some earth scientists landed on a very convenient answer -the presence of the Koyna dam with a fairly large reservoir behind it.

    And it was thought that the weight of the reservoir water was responsible for bringing about the earthquake - 'Reservoir Induced Seismicity' as it was christened.
    ...


    i dont know how and why indians kept going with other dam projects like Sardar Sarovar Dam project having known earthquakes could be induced when big dams are around but i think some ractional indians with basic knowledges knew water resources are important for mankind so they kept going.

    imo to build dams is inevitable with population increasing. i guess new technology can help us find some good ways to further get some thing from the nature and avoid getting harm from it.
     

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