Why quitting Siachen will be disastrous

Discussion in 'Pakistan' started by shubhamsaikia, Apr 24, 2012.

  1. shubhamsaikia

    shubhamsaikia Regular Member

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    Following the 1947-48 war between India and Pakistan, the Cease Fire Line was delineated under the Karachi Agreement of 1949 only up to a point on the map known as Point NJ 9842. The area to the north, being highly inaccessible and glaciated, was not delineated, but the direction of the CFL beyond NJ 9842 was unambiguously stated as ‘thence north to the glaciers.’ The same happened when the CFL was replaced by the LoC after the 1971 war.

    In 1984, having received hard intelligence that the Pakistani army was about to secure the area, the Indian army, in a preemptive move, occupied the Saltoro Ridge, which constitutes the watershed and runs parallel to the length of the Siachen Glacier on its western side. It has been called the Actual Ground Position Line since. The Pakistani army made many attempts to throw us back, but all such attacks were repulsed. Having failed militarily, Pakistan decided negotiations were a more pragmatic option.

    Discussions so far have been unsuccessful as Pakistan has been insisting on their terms for a resolution. The Pakistan army’s last audacious attempt to dislodge us from Siachen was made in 1999, when they captured Kargil and surrounding areas with the aim of cutting off our supply routes to Ladakh and secure Siachen by this indirect stratagem. However, the bravery and courage of our troops saved the day. Another pertinent fact that must not be lost sight of is that in 1963, Pakistan had unilaterally and illegally conceded the Shaksgam area, north of Siachen, to China.

    Since early April, following a major avalanche in the area occupied by the Pakistani army, an orchestrated attempt is being made to bring the issue back in focus. The important myths and realities are discussed below. First, the contention that Siachen and Saltoro have no strategic value is wrong. If Saltoro had not been occupied by our troops, Pakistan from the west and China from the east would have long since linked up, with the strategic Karakoram Pass under their complete control. The illegal ceding away of the Shaksgam Valley by Pakistan to China has completed the encirclement of this crucial area. It is only our occupation of Saltoro that has driven a wedge between the two. By controlling Saltoro, we have also retained the option of negotiating with China over Shaksgam valley at the appropriate time.

    Second, the Pakistani stance that since India is the aggressor, it should vacate the area, is a travesty of truth, as what our troops did in April 1984 was to occupyour own areas; no border or line was crossed as the entire area, not having been delineated, belongs to India.

    Third, it is stated that unnecessary casualties are being incurred on account of the treacherous terrain and climate. This is no longer the case with us, as the Indian army has learnt its lessons. Fourth, an additional reason stated is that Rs5 crore is being spent every day on our troops there. While the figure may be disputed, should sovereignty be measured in this manner?

    The Siachen issue is important for the peace process, but there are many others that are more important and pressing, and which need to be resolved first. We seem to have fallen for the Pakistani ploy of looking at Siachen as a separate issue, unrelated to the LoC, when de facto it is an extension of the LoC. Pakistan’s compulsion on the issue must not translate into a sellout by India, for it will be an unmitigated disaster if it happens.

    The most important point we have to keep in mind is that while it suits Pakistan to get our troops to vacate the commanding heights of the Saltoro Ridge, we would lose them permanently if we do so, as regaining them would be militarily extremely difficult. Despite this, if there is a compulsion to resolve the issue, then the first action must be to delineate the AGPL, before any shifting of troops takes place. Pakistan has so far refused to accept this, perhaps with an ulterior motive of occupying it at some future date!

    Pakistan has been proposing that both sides should withdraw to positions that existed prior to the occupation of the Saltoro Ridge, but this must not be accepted as our troops will take longer to return to their positions, should this become necessary, on account of the difficult terrain on our side. There is also a need to work out a detailed joint mechanism to ensure that the terms of the resolution are strictly adhered to.
     
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  3. Bhadra

    Bhadra Defence Professionals Defence Professionals Senior Member

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    The only myth and reality is that India has some military advanatage in Siachin...

    Why lose it and for what in return...

    hand over the listed 19 terrorists including Dawood and Hafiz Sayid..... and Mushy boy, Hamid Gul etc.....
     
  4. shubhamsaikia

    shubhamsaikia Regular Member

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    Because India is at greater Heights and that t he Siachen glacier is over looking the Salgotra ridge, the Indian Army's only hope of cutting the Karakoram Highway lies there. De-Military Siachen will be like shooting bullets in our feet. This little edge that we have should remain. Yes it's difficult to man Siachen not because of it weather but because of it Height but every dime spent there is worth it.
     
  5. utubekhiladi

    utubekhiladi The Preacher Elite Member

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    shubhamsaikia bro, also please include source link
     
  6. H.A.

    H.A. Senior Member Senior Member

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  7. shubhamsaikia

    shubhamsaikia Regular Member

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    Lt Gen Vijay Oberoi | Tuesday, April 24, 2012 DNA
     
  8. utubekhiladi

    utubekhiladi The Preacher Elite Member

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    Pakistan Army falling in love with India ?

    Did I hear it right? Pakistan’s Army Chief Ashfaq Parvez Kayani recently surprised the international community when he called for peaceful coexistence with India and demilitarisation of the Siachen glacier.

    Does his statement indicate a change in the mindset of the Pakistan Army towards India? What happened to the traditional stance the Pakistani Army has adopted on India? Why a sudden departure? Are anti-India statements not evoking enough sentiments back home? So Mr Kayani thought of trying something different this time.

    I think the recent avalanche tragedy has pushed Pakistan into a state of introspection as the country is paying a heavier price than India in Siachen as far as human and financial costs are concerned.

    His remarks came a day after Nawaz Sharif, the chief of the main opposition party PML-N, urged the Pakistan government to take initiative on resolving the Siachen issue with India.

    Undoubtedly, both India and Pakistan spend heavily on their military while millions of their people languish in poverty. The tragedy in Siachen has sparked a debate about the human as well as financial cost the two sides are bearing.

    After visiting the site of the avalanche in Siachen that buried 124 Pakistani soldiers on April 07, General Kayani told reporters: “The world knows why we are in Siachen… World knows India first sent troops to Siachen which subsequently prompted Pakistan to do so.” However, he added that this conflict should be resolved.

    The Pakistan Army Chief played it smart when he endorsed the idea of peaceful coexistence between the nuclear-armed neighbours, but tried to put the blame on India for Siachen impasse. It seems that his statement in the wake of the tragedy is aimed at building pressure on India to reach an agreement with Pakistan on the Siachen issue.

    Reports suggest that the simmering rebellion in Gilgit-Baltistan against Islamabad is pushing the Pakistani Army to think of demilitarisation.

    India should not enter in any deal with Pakistan on Siachen without understanding the repercussions of China’s presence in Gilgit-Baltistan. Reports have suggested that China has over the past decade become increasingly involved in Gilgit-Baltistan, strategically as well as economically.

    Gilgit-Baltistan in the Pakistan-occupied Kashmir is an important region in terms of its geo-strategic location. Since it is a resource-rich region, China cannot afford to leave it for exploitation. The “all-weather friend” of Pakistan seeks this region to assure unfettered road and rail access to the Gulf. In fact, China’s projects like mega dams are a threat to environment as they could accelerate glacial melting and lead to flashfloods.

    Keeping in mind the developments, India needs to be cautious enough while drafting its stand on Siachen vis-à-vis Pakistan.

    (The views expressed by the author are personal)


    Is Pak Army falling in love with India?
     
  9. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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    Maintaining soldiers in the disadvantageous positions by Pakistan was never well advised, IMHO. India, even if it could, would not risk climbing down from Siachen into Pakistan controlled Indian territory anyway. For Pakistan, it was always about making a point. Mount K2 is but a short flight from Siachen, and that peak is regularly scaled by the Chinese and Chinese hosted or sponsored mountaineers from the Shaksgam Valley, which is Indian territory that Pakistan has handed over to PRC. If we are to ever claim Shaksgam, we need to hold on to Siachen. Experienced military strategists may disagree. All I understand is that, unlilke Pakistan, India is not feeling any financial bite to have to withdraw from there.
     
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  10. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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    Shaksgam Valley w.r.t. Siachen

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  11. mayfair

    mayfair Elite Member Elite Member

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    We will not pull out of Siachen regardless of what the kandle kissers or the traitors within, say or want us to do. I believe the politucal representatives and the armed forces are pretty much on the same side on this.

    Siachen ki barfeeli chotiyon par hum baithe hain aur pichhwaada Pakistaniyon ka jama hua hai :lol:
     
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