Which 2 countries are most likely to go to war over the next decades?

Discussion in 'International Politics' started by kickok1975, Mar 4, 2011.

  1. kickok1975

    kickok1975 Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    Which 2 countries are most likely to go to war over the next decade?

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    The latest Foreign Policy Magazine survey shows India-Pakistan relationship is among the top dangerous situation in the world right now, and a war between these two countries are considered one of the most likely scenario in next 10 years

    Since both India and Pakistan posses Nuclear weapons, one may wondering if such prediction is realistic or exaggerating. A generally peaceful but constant bumpy relationship might be better condidate.
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2011
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  3. redragon

    redragon Regular Member

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    looks like China is a very peaceful country in eyes of most people.
     
  4. kickok1975

    kickok1975 Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    India and Pakistan are not always face off each other

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    They marry each other too

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  5. kickok1975

    kickok1975 Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    How Pakistan fall in love with Bollywood

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    How Pakistan Fell in Love With Bollywood
    The history of a culture clash.
    BY ANUJ CHOPRA | MARCH 15, 2010

    Last month, just before the release of the Bollywood film My Name Is Khan, a message generated in Pakistan on the microblogging site Twitter was massively retweeted in Mumbai, India: "You might want to come to Karachi to catch MNIK's first day, first show!"
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    The release of My Name Is Khan, or MNIK, as it is popularly known, had to be scaled back in Mumbai, India's film capital, because of a political controversy. Just days before the premier, its lead actor, Shah Rukh Khan, had lamented the exclusion of Pakistani cricketers from the Indian Premier League cricket auction. This infuriated Shiv Sena, a Hindu ultranationalist group that advocates snapping all sporting and cultural ties with Pakistan. It launched a campaign against Khan, threatening to stall his film's release until he apologized and retracted his statement, which he refused to do. Placard-wielding protesters besieged his mansion in suburban Mumbai, burning his effigy and bellowing slogans like "Shah Rukh Khan, go away to Pakistan!" One of the protesters clutched in his hands a dummy airline ticket emblazoned with the words: "Mumbai to Pakistan." Mumbai stationed police officers at movie theaters and rounded up 2,000 people in advance of the opening as a cautionary measure.
    Meanwhile, on the other side of the border in Karachi, My Name Is Khan opened Feb. 13 to packed houses and was received with roaring claps and whistles. According to Pakistani cinema owners, it was the highest-earning film ever to screen in Pakistan.
    This film certainly resonates with Pakistani audiences because of its theme -- it tells the story of an autistic Muslim man's struggles against prejudices in the United States in the immediate aftermath of the 9/11 attacks. The big applause line in Pakistan comes at the beginning, when Khan proclaims, "My name is Khan, and I am not a terrorist!" But the widely published tweet inviting Indians to watch the film in Karachi offered a somewhat twisted insight into a cultural paradox: two countries sharing so many cultural references, and yet watching them through such different lenses.
    The division between India and Pakistan has been compared to the split between East Germany and West Germany during the Cold War, but the situations are widely divergent. Whereas Germany's division after World War II was largely peaceful, if tense, the subcontinent's partition in 1947 into separate Hindu and Muslim territories was followed by a fratricidal bloodbath. More than a million people were killed and 12 million uprooted. Refugees traveled by foot, carts, and trains to their promised new home, making it one of the largest mass migrations in history.
    Since partition, the two countries have spent decades attempting to erect barriers against cultural exchange across the border. Bollywood movies were banned in Pakistan after 1965, following the bloody Indo-Pakistani War. After Pakistani Gen. Muhammad Zia-ul-Haq toppled Prime Minister Zulfikar Ali Bhutto in 1977, he initiated a process of sweeping Islamization that cemented the artificial split between Indian and Pakistani culture. He labeled entertainment, particularly Indian entertainment, as fahashi, or vulgar. Classical Indian music and dance were banned, and colleges were instructed to shut down their music societies. He banned the sari, a Hindu garment that, according to him, revealed too much of a woman's body. Pakistani columnist Sarwat Ali has noted that in state TV programs, women playing negative roles were shown wearing Indian clothes (mainly saris), while the good ones wear salwar kameez and a dupatta, a more modest outfit that involves loose pants under a tunic, with a shawl covering the hair.

    In 2003, a new peace process blossomed, and cultural contact blossomed along with it. New train and bus services were created between major cities, meaning that the two countries could connect, not only literally (poor families separated by partition rejoining for the first time), but also with shared cultural moments, such as the journey of Noor Fathima, or Baby Fathima, a 2-year-old Pakistani girl born with cardiac defects who rode the bus from Lahore to a hospital in Bangalore to be cured.
    The period also saw a rise in exchanges of actors and musicians, though some went sour. Nazar, a 2005 Bollywood film that was touted as a cross-border collaboration and starred Pakistani star Meera, provoked death threats from Pakistani conservatives when a Lahore tabloid published photos of Meera and her co-star embracing.
    Former Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf finally lifted the 40-year-old ban on Bollywood films in February 2008. Because of the active, and largely undisturbed, smuggling trade, the ban had become meaningless -- and though the government made much noise about lifting it in a way that wouldn't harm "religious and cultural norms and values," the motivation was economic. Pakistan's film industry had been driven into the ground by the ready availability of cheap pirated copies of Bollywood films. "Lollywood," as the Lahore-based industry is known, had lobbied the government to overturn the ban so that Pakistan could encourage India to begin importing Pakistani movies, while Pakistani cinemas could start reaping the rewards of Bollywood's popularity. Whatever the motives, however, Pakistani viewers welcomed the Indian films with open arms, even if the censored ones screened in cinemas were often far less interesting than the unexpurgated pirated version they could watch on DVD or VHS.
    But the November 2008 terrorist attacks on Mumbai stalled the peace talks indefinitely and reignited the culture clash as well, sparking nationalist parties in India and putting Pakistan in a defensive crouch. Soon after the attacks, Maharashtra Navnirman Sena (MNS), an ultranationalist political party created in 2006 after breaking away from Shiv Sena, began a campaign to eliminate all cultural associations with Pakistan. Its activists harassed Oxford Bookstore, a prominent Mumbai bookstore, until it stopped selling all books by Pakistani authors. The MNS also drove out Shakeel Siddiqui, a Pakistani stand-up comedian performing in Mumbai last year, sternly warning him never to return to India. The group asked "Karachi Sweets," a shop selling Indian sweets in Mumbai, to purge the Pakistani city from its name. The owners of Karachi Sweets, the Athwani family, who migrated to India from Karachi after partition, were forced to change the name of their shop to "Sri Krishna Sweets."
    In Pakistan, meanwhile, there were rumblings of a new Bollywood ban, though nothing ever came of it. Still, the cultural détente built in the heady days of the new millennium had clearly stalled, even before the outbursts surrounding Shah Rukh Khan's cricket comments and the release of My Name Is Khan.
    It's not clear when the situation will improve. Last month's tepid security talks between the Indian and Pakistani foreign ministers, following on a cafe bombing in the western Indian city of Pune, seem unlikely to build rapprochement. And little cultural progress can take place so long as terrorism remains a serious threat to both countries. Cultural progress remains hostage to the issue of terrorism. And without cultural intermingling, it's easy for jingoists to whip up hysteria each time a bomb detonates in India and leaves telltale signs of cross-border involvement. Controversies that begin as minor spats quickly escalate into violent political conflagrations, as with the My Name Is Khan mess, and until both sides eschew military competition and engage in joint defense arrangements against the very real common threats of the Taliban and al Qaeda, this pattern will continue. If either country wants to stop, it'll have to issue a far more sincere invitation to engage in joint actions than a retweeted joke.

    Of course, Pakistanis, especially in the cities, never gave up on their love for Indian culture: They continued to smuggle VHS tapes of Indian films into the country, and they bought satellite dishes to watch Indian programs. More recently, cable operators began to sometimes broadcast Indian TV shows, concealing the logos so that the shows would look like local broadcasts and evade the authorities' attention. Although Pakistani children couldn't watch Bollywood movies in the cinema, they still read the Urdu versions of Indian gossip magazines like Stardust and followed Bollywood fashions as much as they were allowed.
     
  6. kickok1975

    kickok1975 Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    Not really, we just don't have immediate enemy right now.
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2011
  7. kickok1975

    kickok1975 Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    Pakistan Girl

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    Indian girl

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  8. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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    Kickok1975, you have a good taste in women bud! You probably have a colourful life.

    My salutations to you. :)
     
  9. kickok1975

    kickok1975 Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    The history of Indian-Pakistan relationship

    Relations between India and Pakistan are defined by the violent partition of British India in 1947, the Kashmir dispute and the numerous military conflicts fought between the two nations. Consequently, even though the two South Asian nations share historic, cultural, geographic, and economic links, their relationship has been plagued by hostility and suspicion.

    After the dissolution of the British Raj in 1947, two new sovereign nations were formed — the Union of India and the Dominion of Pakistan. The subsequent partition of the former British India displaced up to 12.5 million people, with estimates of loss of life varying from several hundred thousand to a million.[1] India emerged as a secular nation with a Hindu majority population and a large Muslim minority while Pakistan was established as an Islamic republic with an overwhelming Muslim majority population

    Soon after their independence, India and Pakistan established diplomatic relations but the violent partition and numerous territorial disputes would overshadow their relationship. Since their independence, the two countries have fought three major wars, one undeclared war and have been involved in numerous armed skirmishes and military standoffs. The Kashmir dispute is the main center-point of all of these conflicts with the exception of the Indo-Pakistan War of 1971, which resulted in the secession of East Pakistan (now Bangladesh).

    There have been numerous attempts to improve the relationship — notably, the Shimla summit, the Agra summit and the Lahore summit. Since the early 1980s, relations between the two nations soured particularly after the Siachen conflict, the intensification of Kashmir insurgency in 1989, Indian and Pakistani nuclear tests in 1998 and the 1999 Kargil war. Certain confidence-building measures — such as the 2003 ceasefire agreement and the Delhi–Lahore Bus service — were successful in deescalating tensions. However, these efforts have been impeded by Pakistan's alleged involvement in various terrorist activities in India. The 2001 Indian Parliament attack almost brought the two nations on the brink of a nuclear war. Additionally, the 2008 Mumbai attacks (which was carried out by Islamic terrorists from Pakistan)[4] resulted in a severe blow to the ongoing India-Pakistan peace talks.

    Seeds of conflict

    About half a million Muslims and Hindus were killed in communal riots following the partition of British India. Millions of Muslims living in India and Hindus and Sikhs living in Pakistan emigrated in one of the most colossal transfers of population in the modern era. Both countries accused each other of not providing adequate security to the minorities emigrating through their territory. This served to increase tensions between the newly-born countries.
    According to the British plan for the partition of British India, all the 680 princely states were allowed to decide which of the two countries to join. With the exception of a few, most of the Muslim-majority princely-states acceded to Pakistan while most of the Hindu-majority princely states joined India. However, the decisions of some of the princely-states would shape the Pakistan-India relationship considerably, in the years to come.

    Junagadh dispute

    Junagadh is one of the modern districts of Saurastra, Gujarat
    Junagadh was a state on the southwestern end of Gujarat, with the principalities of Manavadar, Mangrol and Babriawad. The Arabian Sea stood between it and Pakistan. The state had an overwhelming Hindu population which constituted more than 80% of its citizens, while the ruler of the state was a Muslim. On August 15, 1947, the ruler of the state, Nawab of Junagadh Mahabat Khan acceded to Pakistan. Pakistan confirmed the acceptance of the accession in September 1947. India did not accept the accession as legitimate.
    The Indian point of view was that since Junagadh was a state with a predominantly Hindu population it should be a part of India. Additionally, since the state was encircled by Indian territory it should have been a part of India. Indian politicians also stated that by giving Pakistan a predominantly Hindu region to govern, the basis of the two nation theory was contradicted.

    The Pakistani point of view was that since Junagadh had a ruler and governing body who chose to accede to Pakistan, they should be allowed to do so. Junagadh, having a coastline, could have maintained maritime links with Pakistan. Additionally, Pakistani politicians stated that the two nation theory did not necessarily mean a clear division of land and absolute transfer of populations as the sheer magnitude of such a proceeding would wreak havoc upon millions.
    Neither of the ten states were able to resolve this issue amicably and it only added fuel to an already charged environment.
    Sardar Patel, India's then Home Minister, felt that if Junagadh was permitted to go to Pakistan, it would create communal unrest across Gujarat. The government of India gave Pakistan time to void the accession and hold a plebiscite in Junagadh to pre empt any violence in Gujarat. Samaldas Gandhi formed a government-in-exile, the Arzi Hukumat (in Urdu: Arzi: Transitional, Hukumat: Government) of the people of Junagadh. Patel ordered the annexation of Junagadh's three principalities.

    Kashmir dispute

    Main article: Kashmir conflict
    Kashmir was a princely state, ruled by a Hindu[5] king, Maharaja Hari Singh. The Maharaja of Kashmir was equally hesitant to join either India–, because he knew his Muslim subjects would not like to join a Hindu-based and Hindu-majority nation[citation needed]-, or Pakistan– which as a Hindu he was personally averse to[citation needed]. Pakistan coveted the Himalayan kingdom, while Indian leader Mahatma Gandhi[citation needed] and Indian PM Jawaharlal Nehru hoped that the kingdom would join India. Hari Singh signed a Standstill Agreement (preserving status quo) with Pakistan, but did not make his decision by August 15, 1947.
    Rumours spread in Pakistan that Hari Singh was trying to accede Kashmir to India. Alarmed by this threat, a team of Pakistani forces were dispatched into Kashmir, fearing an Indian invasion of the region. Backed by Pakistani paramilitary forces, Pashtuns invaded Kashmir in September 1947. Kashmir's security forces were too weak and ill-equipped to fight against Pakistan. Troubled by the deteriorating political pressure that was being applied to Hari Singh and his governance, the Maharaja asked for India's help. However, the Constitution of India barred the Indian Armed Forces' intervention since Kashmir did not come under India's jurisdiction. Desperate to get India's help and get Kashmir back in his own control, the Maharaja acceded Kashmir to India (which was against the will of the majority of Kashmiris), and signed the Instrument of Accession.[6] By this time the raiders were close to the capital, Srinagar. On October 27, 1947, the Indian Air Force airdropped Indian troops into Srinagar and made an intervention. The Indian troops managed to seize parts of Kashmir which included Jammu, Srinagar and the Kashmir valley itself, but the strong and intense fighting, flagged with the onset of winter, made much of the state impassable. After weeks of intense fighting between Pakistan and India, Pakistani leaders and the Indian Prime Minister Nehru declared a ceasefire and sought U.N. arbitration with the promise of a plebiscite. Sardar Patel had argued against both, describing Kashmir as a bilateral dispute and its accession as justified by international law. In 1957, north-western Kashmir was fully integrated into Pakistan, becoming Azad Kashmir (Pakistan-administered Kashmir), while the other portion was acceded to Indian control, and the state of Jammu and Kashmir (Indian-administered Kashmir) was created. In 1962, China occupied Aksai Chin, the northeastern region bordering Ladakh. In 1984, India launched Operation Meghdoot and captured more than 80% of the Siachen Glacier.
    Pakistan maintains Kashmiris' rights to self-determination through a plebiscite in accordance with an earlier Indian statement and a UN resolution. Pakistan also points to India's failure of not understanding its own political logic and applying it to Kashmir, by taking their opinion on the case of the accession of Junagadh as an example (that the Hindu majority state should have gone to India even though it had a Muslim ruler), that Kashmir should also rightfully and legally have become a part of Pakistan since majoirity of the people were Muslim, even though they had a Hindu ruler. Pakistan also states that at the very least, the promised plebiscite should be allowed to decide the fate of the Kashmiri people.
    India on the other hand asserts that the Maharaja's decision, which was the norm for every other princely state at the time of independence, and subsequent elections, for over 40 years, on Kashmir has made it an integral part of India. This opinion has often become controversial, as Pakistan asserts that the decision of the ruler of Junagadh also adhered to Pakistan. Due to all such political differences, this dispute has also been the subject of wars between the two countries in 1947 and 1965, and a limited conflict in 1999. The state/province remains divided between the two countries by the Line of Control (LoC), which demarcates the ceasefire line agreed upon in the 1947 conflict.
    See also: Indo-Pakistani War of 1947, Indo-Pakistani War of 1965, and Kargil War
    Other Territorial Disputes
    Pakistan is locked in other territorial disputes with India such as the Siachen Glacier and Kori Creek. Pakistan is also currently having dialogue with India regarding the Baglihar Dam being built over the River Chenab in Jammu and Kashmir.

    Bengal refugee crisis

    In 1949, India recorded close to 1 million Hindu refugees, who flooded into West Bengal and other states from East Pakistan(Now Bangladesh), owing to communal violence, intimidation and repression from authorities. The plight of the refugees outraged Hindus and Indian nationalists, and the refugee population drained the resources of Indian states, which were unable to absorb them. While not ruling out war, Prime Minister Nehru and Sardar Patel invited Liaquat Ali Khan for talks in Delhi. Although many Indians termed this appeasement, Nehru signed a pact with Liaquat Ali Khan that pledged both nations to the protection of minorities and creation of minority commissions. Although opposed to the principle, Patel decided to back this Pact for the sake of peace, and played a critical role in garnering support from West Bengal and across India, and enforcing the provisions of the Pact. Khan and Nehru also signed a trade agreement, and committed to resolving bilateral disputes through peaceful means. Steadily, hundreds of thousands of Hindus returned to East Pakistan, but the thaw in relations did not last long, primarily owing to the Kashmir dispute.

    1971 Bangladesh Liberation War

    Main articles: Indo-Pakistani War of 1971 and Bangladesh Liberation War
    Pakistan, since independence, was geo-politically divided into two major regions, West Pakistan and East Pakistan. East Pakistan was occupied mostly by Bengali people. In December 1971, following a political crisis in East Pakistan, the situation soon spiralled out of control in East Pakistan and India intervened in favour of the rebelling Bengali populace. The conflict, a brief but bloody war, resulted in an independence of East Pakistan. In the war, the Pakistani army swiftly fell to India, forcing the independence of East Pakistan, which separated and became Bangladesh. The Pakistani military, being a thousand miles from its base and surrounded by enemies, was forced to give in.


    Simla Agreement

    Since the 1971 war, Pakistan and India have made only slow progress towards the normalisation of relations. In July 1972, Indian Prime Minister Indira Gandhi and Pakistani President Zulfikar Ali Bhutto met in the Indian hill station of Simla. They signed the Simla Agreement, by which India would return all Pakistani personnel (over 90,000) and captured territory in the west, and the two countries would "settle their differences by peaceful means through bilateral negotiations." Diplomatic and trade relations were also re-established in 1976.

    Afghanistan crisis

    After the 1979 Soviet war in Afghanistan where Soviet Union military Occupied Afghanistan, new strains appeared in Indo-Pakistani relations. Pakistan actively supported the Afghan resistance against the Soviet Union, which was a close ally of India, which brought opposing political opinions.
    The Taliban regime in Afghanistan was strongly supported by Pakistan - one of the few countries to do so - before the September 11 attacks. India, on the other hand, firmly opposed the Taliban and criticised Pakistan for supporting it.
    Agreements, talks, and confidence building measures
    In the following eight years, India voiced increasing concern over Pakistani arms purchases, U.S. military aid to Pakistan, and a clandestine nuclear weapons programme. In an effort to curtail tensions, the two countries formed a joint commission to examine disputes. In December 1988, Prime Ministers Benazir Bhutto and Rajiv Gandhi concluded a pact not to attack each other's nuclear facilities. Agreements on cultural exchanges and civil aviation were also initiated.
    In 1997, high-level Indo-Pakistan talks resumed after a three-year pause. The Prime Ministers of Pakistan and India met twice and the foreign secretaries conducted three rounds of talks. In June 1997, the foreign secretaries identified eight "outstanding issues" around which continuing talks would be focused. The dispute over the status of Kashmir, (referred by India as Jammu and Kashmir), an issue since Independence, remains the major stumbling block in their dialogue. India maintains that the entire former princely state is an integral part of the Indian union, while Pakistan insists that UN resolutions calling for self-determination of the people of the state/province must be taken into account. It however refuses to abide by the previous part of the resolution, which calls for it to vacate all territories occupied.
    In September 1997, the talks broke down over the structure of how to deal with the issues of Kashmir, and peace and security. Pakistan advocated that the issues be treated by separate working groups. India responded that the two issues be taken up along with six others on a simultaneous basis. In May 1998 India, and then Pakistan, conducted nuclear tests.
    After Manmohan Singh become prime minister of India the Punjab provincial Government declared it would develop Gah, his place of birth, as a model village in his honour and name a school after him.[7] There is also a village in India named Pakistan, despite occasional pressure over the years to change its name the villagers have resisted.[8]

    2001 Gujarat Earthquake in India

    Pakistani President Pervez Mushrraf sent a plane load of relief supplies to India from Islamabad to Ahmedabad.[9] That carried 200 tents and more than 2,000 Blankets.[10] Furthermore the President called Indian PM to express his 'sympathy' over the loss from the earthquake.[11]
    2005 Earthquake in Pakistan
    India offered generous aid to Pakistan in response to the 2005 Earthquake. Indian and Pakistani High Commissioners consulted with one another regarding cooperation in relief work. India sent 25 tonnes of relief material to Pakistan including food, blankets and medicine. Large Indian companies such as Infosys have offered aid up to $226,000. On October 12, an Ilyushin-76 cargo plane ferried across seven truckloads (about 82 tons) of army medicines, 15,000 blankets and 50 tents and returned to New Delhi. A senior airforce official also stated that they had been asked by the Indian government to be ready to fly out another similar consignment.[12] On October 14, India dispatched the second consignment of relief material to Pakistan, by train through the Wagah Border. The consignment included 5,000 blankets, 370 tents, 5 tons of plastic sheets and 12 tons of medicine. A third consignment of medicine and relief material was also sent shortly afterwards by train.[13] India also pledged $25 million as aid to Pakistan.[14] India opened the first of three points at Chakan Da Bagh, in Poonch, on the Line of Control (LoC) between India and Pakistan for the 2005 Kashmir earthquake relief work. (Rediff) Such generous gestures signalled a new age in confidence, friendliness and cooperation between both India and Pakistan.

    2007 Samjhauta Express bombings

    Main article: 2007 Samjhauta Express bombings
    The 2007 Samjhauta Express bombings was a terrorist attack targeted on the Samjhauta Express train on the 18th of February. The Samjhauta Express is an international train that runs from New Delhi, India to Lahore, Pakistan, and is one of two trains to cross the India-Pakistan border.

    2008 Mumbai attacks
    Main article: 2008 Mumbai attacks
    The 2008 Mumbai attacks by ten terrorists killed over 173 and wounded 308. The sole surviving gunman Ajmal Kasab who was arrested during the attacks was found to be a Pakistani national. This fact was acknowledged by Pakistani authorities.[15] In May 2010, an Indian court convicted him on four counts of murder, waging war against India, conspiracy and terrorism offences, and sentenced him to death.[16]
    India blamed the Lashkar-e-Taiba, a Pakistan-based militant group, for planning and executing the attacks. Islamabad resisted the claims and demanded evidence. India provided evidence in the form of interrogations, weapons, candy wrappers, Pakistani Brand Milk Packets, and telephone sets.[17] Indian officials demanded Pakistan extradite suspects for trial. They also said that, given the sophistication of the attacks, the perpetrators "must have had the support of some official agencies in Pakistan".[18]

    Terrorism In Kashmir
    See also: Insurgency in Jammu and Kashmir
    Terrorism in Jammu and Kashmir
    Terrorist attacks on Jammu & Kashmir State Assembly: A car bomb exploded near the Jammu and Kashmir State Assembly on October 1, 2001, killing 27 people on an attack that was blamed on Kashmiri separatists. It was one of the most prominent attacks against India apart from on the Indian Parliament in December 2001. The dead bodies of the terrorists and the data recovered from them revealed that Pakistan was solely responsible for the activity.[4]
    • 1997 Sangrampora massacre: On March 21, 1997, 7 Kashmiri Pandits were killed in Sangrampora village in the Budgam district.
    • Wandhama Massacre: In January 1998, 24 Kashmiri Pandits living in the city Wandhama were killed by Islamic terrorists.
    • Qasim Nagar Attack: On July 13, 2003, armed men believed to be a part of the Lashkar-e-Toiba threw hand grenades at the Qasim Nagar market in Srinagar and then fired on civilians standing nearby killing twenty-seven and injuring many more.[5]
    • Assassination of Abdul Ghani Lone: Abdul Ghani Lone, a prominent All Party Hurriyat Conference leader, was assassinated by an unidentified gunmen during a memorial rally in Srinagar. The assassination resulted in wide-scale demonstrations against the Indian occupied-forces for failing to provide enough security cover for Mr. Lone.[6]
    • July 20, 2005 Srinagar Bombing: A car bomb exploded near an armoured Indian Army vehicle in the famous Church Lane area in Srinagar killing four Indian Army personnel, one civilian and the suicide bomber. Terrorist group Hizbul Mujahideen, claimed responsibility for the attack.[7]
    • Budshah Chowk attack: A terrorist attack on July 29, 2005 at Srinigar's city centre, Budshah Chowk, killed two and left more than 17 people injured. Most of those injured were media journalists.[8]
    • Murder of Ghulam Nabi Lone: On October 18, 2005 suspected Army man killed Jammu and Kashmir's then education minister Ghulam Nabi Lone. No Terrorist group claimed responsibility for the attack. [9]


    Terrorist activities elsewhere
    The attack on the Indian Parliament was by far the most dramatic attack carried out by Pakistani terrorists. India blamed Pakistan for carrying out the attacks, an allegation which Pakistan strongly denied and one that brought both nations to the brink of a nuclear confrontation in 2001-02. However, international peace efforts ensured the cooling of tensions between the two nuclear-capable nations.
    Apart from this, the most notable was the hijacking of Indian Airlines Flight IC 814 en route New Delhi from Kathmandu, Nepal. The plane was hijacked on December 24, 1999 approximately one hour after take off and was taken to Amritsar airport and then to Lahore in Pakistan. After refueling the plane took off for Dubai and then finally landed in Kandahar, Afghanistan. Under intense media pressure, New Delhi complied with the hijackers' demand and freed Maulana Masood Azhar from its captivity in return for the freedom of the Indian passengers on the flight. The decision, however, cost New Delhi dearly. Maulana, who is believed to be hiding in Karachi, later became the leader of Jaish-e-Mohammed, an organisation which has carried out several terrorist acts against Indian Security Forces in Kashmir.[10]
    On December 22, 2000, a group of terrorists belonging to the Lashkar-e-Toiba stormed the famous Red Fort in New Delhi. The Fort houses an Indian military unit and a high-security interrogation cell used both by the Central Bureau of Investigation and the Indian Army. The terrorists successfully breached the security cover around the Red Fort and opened fire at the Indian military personnel on duty killing two of them on spot. The attack was significant because it was carried out just two days after the declaration of the cease-fire between India and Pakistan.[11]
    Two Kashmiri terrorists belonging to Jaish-e-Mohammed raided the Swami Narayan temple complex in Ahmedabad, Gujarat killing 30 people, including 18 women and five children. The attack was carried out on September 25, 2002, just few days after state elections were held in Jammu and Kashmir. Two identical letters found on both the terrorists claimed that the attack was done in retaliation for the deaths of thousands of Muslims during the Gujarat riots.[12]
    Two car bombs exploded in south Mumbai on August 25, 2003; one near the Gateway of India and the other at the famous Zaveri Bazaar, killing at least 48 and injuring 150 people. Though no terrorist group claimed responsibility for the attacks, Mumbai Police and RAW suspected Lashkar-e-Toiba's hand in the twin blasts.[13]
    In an unsuccessful attempt, six terrorists belonging to Lashkar-e-Toiba, stormed the Ayodhya Ram Janmbhomi complex on July 5, 2005. Before the terrorists could reach the main disputed site, they were shot down by Indian security forces. One Hindu worshipper and two policemen were injured during the incident.[14]
    Alleged Human rights violations by India
    A report by the Human Rights Watch, stated two main reasons for the improving human rights condition in the region: First, sincere efforts were made by the new Jammu and Kashmir state government headed by Mufti Muhammad Sayeed to investigate cases of human rights abuses in the state and to punish those guilty including Indian soldiers. More than 15 Indian army soldiers were convicted by the Indian government in 2004 for carrying out human rights abuses in the state. Second, the decrease in cross-border infiltration into India by armed insurgents.[15]
    Developments since 2004
    Violent activities in the region declined in 2004. There are two main reasons for this: warming of relations between New Delhi and Islamabad which consequently lead to a ceasefire between the two countries in 2003 and the fencing of the LOC being carried out by the Indian Army. Moreover, coming under intense international pressure, Islamabad was compelled to take actions against the militants' training camps on its territory. In 2004, the two countries also agreed upon decreasing the number of troops present in the region.
    Under pressure, Kashmiri militant organisations have made an offer for talks and negotiations with New Delhi, which India has welcomed.
    India's Border Security Force blamed the Pakistani military for providing cover-fire for the terrorists whenever they infiltrated into Indian territory from Pakistan. Pakistan has in turn has also blamed India for providing support for terrorist groups inside Pakistan such as the MQM
    In 2005, Pakistan's information minister, Sheikh Rashid, was alleged to have run a terrorist training camp in 1990 in N.W. Frontier, Pakistan. The Pakistani government dismissed the charges against its minister as an attempt to hamper the ongoing peace process between the two neighbours.
    Both India and Pakistan have launched several mutual confidence-building measures (CBMs) to ease tensions between the two. These include more high-level talks, easing visa restrictions, and restarting of cricket matches between the two. The new bus service between Srinagar and Muzaffarabad has also helped bring the two sides closer. Pakistan and India have also decided to co-operate on economic fronts.
    A major clash between Indian Security Forces and militants occurred when a group of insurgents tried to infiltrate into the Indian-administered Kashmir from Pakistan in July 2005. The same month also saw a Kashmiri militant attack on Ayodhya and Srinagar. However, these developments had little impact on the peace process.
    Some improvements in the relations are seen with the re-opening of a series of transportation networks near the India–Pakistan border, with the most important being bus routes and railway lines.
    An Indian man held in Pakistani prisons since 1975 as an accused spy walked across the border to freedom March 3, 2008, an unconditional release that Pakistan said was done to improve relations between the two countries.[19]
    In 2006, a "Friends Without Borders" scheme began with the help of two British tourists. The idea was that Indian and Pakistani children would make pen pals and write friendly letters to each other. The idea was so successful in both countries that the organisation found it "impossible to keep up". The World's Largest Love Letter was recently sent from India to Pakistan.[20]
    In April 2010 a high profile Pakistani cricketer, Shoaib Malik married the Indian tennis star Sania Mirza.[21] The wedding received much media attention and was said to transfix both India and Pakistan.[22]
    On 10 Feb, 2011, India agreed to resume talks with Pakistan which were suspended after 26/11 Mumbai Attacks[23]. India had put on hold all the diplomatic relations saying it will only continue if Pakistan will act against the accused of Mumbai attacks.
    Possible solutions to the Kashmir issue
    Many consider that the best way to end present violence in Kashmir is negotiations between various Kashmiri-separatists groups, Pakistan and India. Here are a few possible solutions [16] to the Kashmir dispute[17] -
    The status quo Currently a boundary - the Line of Control (LOC)- divides the region in two, with one part administered by India and one by Pakistan. India would like to formalize this status quo and make it the accepted international boundary. Factors Opposing - Pakistan rejects the plan partially as it will get lesser control over the region and wants greater. Kashmiri political parties too would oppose the plan as it violates the UN resolution for a referendum
    Kashmir becomes a part of India
    Though New Delhi and much of the Hindu population of Jammu and Buddhists in Ladakh would have no objections to such a plan.[24] Factors Opposing– The Muslim majority population of Pakistan-administered Azad Kashmir, might object the outcome as would a majority of those in Kashmir valley in India

    The status quo for something else Pakistan accepts the status quo in return for India giving away disputed Sir Creek

    Kashmir becomes a part of Pakistan
    Kashmir joining Pakistan. Factors Opposing– The communities of Hindus of Jammu and the Buddhists of Ladakh would object the outcome. Hindu Kashmiri Pandits, who were forced out of Kashmir by militants are also a major topic to consider.
    Kashmir becomes an independent sovereign republic As an independent state, the region would most likely be economically viable with tourism probably being the largest source of income, however being a landlocked country, it would be heavily dependent on India and Pakistan. Factors Opposing - The outcome is unlikely because it requires both India and Pakistan (and potentially China) to give up territory.

    A smaller independent Kashmir A smaller independent Kashmir formed out of the current strip of Kashmir (administered by Pakistan) and the Kashmir valley (controlled by India). This would leave the Northern areas with Pakistan while India retains Jammu and Ladakh. However this region should maintain good relations with both India and Pakistan as it is landlocked and is covered with snow in winter. This region can also have its defence and foreign relations jointly handled by India and Pakistan. Factors Opposing - The outcome is unlikely because it requires both India and Pakistan to give up territory.

    Re-evaluation
    The insurgents who initially started their movement as a pro-Kashmiri independence movement, have gone through a lot of change in their ideology. Most of the insurgents portray their struggle as a religious one.
    Indian analysts allege that by supporting these insurgents, Pakistan is trying to wage a proxy war against India while Pakistan claims that it regards most of these insurgent groups as "freedom fighters" rather than terrorists
    Internationally known to be the most deadly theatre of conflict, nearly 10 million people, including Muslims, Hindus, and Buddhists, have been fighting a daily battle for survival. The cross-border firing between India and Pakistan, and the terrorist attacks combined have taken its toll on the Kashmiris, who have suffered poor living standards and an erosion of human rights.
    This section requires expansion.

    Kargil crisis
    Attempts to restart dialogue between the two nations were given a major boost by the February 1999 meeting of both Prime Ministers in Lahore and their signing of three agreements.
    These efforts have since been stalled by the intrusion of Pakistani forces into Indian territory near Kargil in Jammu and Kashmir in May 1999. This resulted in intense fighting between Indian and Pakistani forces, known as the Kargil conflict. Backed by the Indian Air Force, the Indian Army successfully regained Kargil. A subsequent military coup in Pakistan that overturned the democratically elected Nawaz Sharif government in October of the same year also proved a setback to relations.
    In 2001, a summit was called in Agra; Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf turned up to meet Indian Prime Minister Atal Behari Vajpayee. The talks fell through.
    On June 20, 2004, with a new government in place in India, both countries agreed to extend a nuclear testing ban and to set up a hotline between their foreign secretaries aimed at preventing misunderstandings that might lead to a nuclear war. [18]
    As of early 2005, both countries are committed to a process of dialogue to solve all outstanding issues. Baglihar Dam issue was a new issue raised by Pakistan in 2005.
    Sporting ties
    Main article: Sports diplomacy#Cricket
    Cricket and hockey matches between the two (as well as other sports to a lesser degree such as those of the SAARC games) have often been political in nature. During the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan Generah Zia-ul Haq traveled to India for a bout of "cricket diplomacy" to keep India from supporting the Soviets by opening another front. Pervez Musharaff also tried to do the same more than a decade later but to no avail.
    Diasporic relations
    Indians and Pakistanis living in the Britain are said to have friendly relations with one another.[25][26] There are various cities such as Birmingham, Blackburn and Manchester where both communities live alongside each other in peace and harmony. Both Indians and Pakistanis living in the UK fit under the category of British Asian. The UK is also home to the Pakistan & India friendship forum.[27]
    The MEP Saj Karim is of Pakistani origin. He is a member of the European Parliament Friends of India Group, Karim was also responsible for opening up Europe to free trade with India.[28][29] He has given his full support to the Indian government for a death sentence to be given to Ajmal Kasab,[30] who was involved in the 2008 Mumbai attacks
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2011
  10. kickok1975

    kickok1975 Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    lol, I'm not Muslim and can't marry a muslim woman.
     
  11. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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    Love knows no bounds buddy.

    "Tu pyaar ka saagar hai" - it means, you are the ocean of love. (interpret it whatever way you want, it is actually from a Hindi song)

    Anyways, I don't want this to get into a wrong direction, and this is not supposed to be a political question, but don't Han men marry Uighur women in PRC? Just curious. Legally, it should not be a problem.

    P.S.:

    Love is blind, let it be blind. Don't let politics, religion or anything in this world stop you from seeking the fair maiden you want.

    I want to share a poem with you: La Belle Dame Sans Merci, Keats , 1819. Hope you like it.

    All the best to you.
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2011
  12. kickok1975

    kickok1975 Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    Yes, I personally saw some. But most of them have to convert to Islamism before marry their sweet heart.
     
  13. LurkerBaba

    LurkerBaba Staff Administrator

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    Is this also the case with the Hui ?
     
  14. kickok1975

    kickok1975 Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    I sincerely hope India and Pakistan have a better relationship in the future and be removed from this damn list once for all. I can't imagine people separated a little over 60 years ago from a same country where they lived thousands year could turn so resentful and hateful to each other
     
  15. kickok1975

    kickok1975 Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    For Hui, way more marriages between Han and Hui but Han Men still need convert to Muslim, no choice.
     
  16. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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    I must say, Uighur women are really pretty:

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    P.S.: I have seen many Indian women like that.
     
  17. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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    I would add the following to the list:
    • Armenia-Azerbaijan
    • Uzbekistan-Kyrgyzstan
    • US-Iran
     
  18. kickok1975

    kickok1975 Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    US-Iran is there on list, pmaitra
     
  19. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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    LOL, yeah, thanks for the corrigendum. So is Armenia-Azerbaijan. I just overlooked it. Thanks.
     
  20. kickok1975

    kickok1975 Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    She is our Hottest Uighur in China now

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  21. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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    ^^ Cool.

    Thanks for sharing. She is really pretty.
     

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