Where does Indian claim to Gilgit-Baltistan come from?

Discussion in 'Defence & Strategic Issues' started by ArmchairGeneral, May 18, 2015.

  1. ArmchairGeneral

    ArmchairGeneral Regular Member

    Nov 7, 2014
    Likes Received:
    I am aware of the situation with PoK so called "azad jammu kashmir" being a part of maharaja hari singh's princely state, and Pakistan's illegal occupation. However, Gilgit- Baltistan was ruled by princely states of Hunza and Nagar, which individually acceded to Pakistan, hence why PoK and G-B have different constitutional statuses within Pakistan.

    If Hunza and Nagar princely states acceded to Pakistan, where does Indian claim to G-B originate?
  3. Zebra

    Zebra Senior Member Senior Member

    Mar 18, 2011
    Likes Received:
    Q : Where does Indian claim to Gilgit-Baltistan come from?

    A : From Heaven. It came straight from Heaven.

    freegan clown.
  4. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Apr 17, 2009
    Likes Received:
    “ The period of greatest prosperity was probably under the Shin Ras, whose rule seems to have been peaceable and settled. The whole population, from the Ra to the poorest subject lived by agriculture. According to tradition, Shri Buddutt's rule extended over Chitral, Yassin, Tangir, Darel,Chilas, Gor, Astor, Hunza, Nagar and Haramosh all of which were held by tributary princes of the same family.[4]
    The area had been a flourishing tract but prosperity was destroyed by warfare over the next fifty years, and by the great flood of 1841 in which the river Indus was blocked by a landslip below the Hatu Pir and the valley was turned into a lake.[14] After the death of Abas, Sulaiman Shah, raja of Yasin, conquered Gilgit. Then, Azad Khan, Raja of Punial, killed Sulaiman Shah, taking Gilgit; then Tair Shah, Raja of Buroshall (Nagar), took Gilgit and killed Azad Khan. Tair Shah's son Shah Sakandar inherited, only to be killed by Gaur Rahman, Raja of Yasin of the Khushwakhte Dynasty, when he took Gilgit. Then in 1842, Shah Sakandar's brother, Karim Khan, expelled Gaur Rahman with the support of a Sikh army from Kashmir. The Sikh general, Nathu Shah, left garrison troops and Karim Khan ruled until Gilgit was ceded to Gulab Singh of Jammu and Kashmir in 1846 by the Treaty of Amritsar,[1] and Dogra troops replaced the Sikh in Gilgit.

    Nathu Shah and Karim Khan both transferred their allegiance to Gulab Singh, continuing local administration. When Hunza attacked in 1848, both of them were killed. Gilgit fell to the Hunza and their Yasin and Punial allies, but was soon reconquered by Gulab Singh's Dogra troops. With the support of Gaur Rahman, Gilgit's inhabitants drove their new rulers out in an uprising in 1852. Gaur Rahman then ruled Gilgit until his death in 1860, just before new Dogra forces from Ranbir Singh, son of Gulab Singh, captured the fort and town.[1] In the 1870s Chitral was threatened by Afghans, Maharaja Ranbir Singh was firm in protecting Chitral from Afghans, the Mehtar of Chitral asked for help. In 1876 Chitral accepted the authority of Jammu Clan and in reverse get the protection from the Dogras who have in the past took part in many victories over Afghans during the time of Gulab Singh Dogra.[15]

    ALBY likes this.

Share This Page