What? Raymond Davis is one of my neighbor!

Discussion in 'China' started by kickok1975, Mar 18, 2011.

  1. kickok1975

    kickok1975 Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    Can't believe, his family has been living in our community since August. Most people in our neighborhood are nice and friendly.

    Denver Post:

    The American accused of killing two Pakistani civilians has a home in Highlands Ranch, 9News has confirmed. The U.S. State Department is trying to get the man released, saying he has diplomatic immunity.
    Wednesday afternoon, multiple sources confirmed that Raymond Allen Davis has a home in Highlands Ranch. Davis' security firm has filed paperwork to do business in Colorado.

    Pakistani authorities are currently holding Davis on suspicion of murdering two Pakistani civilians last Thursday in Lahore, Pakistan. The U.S. State Department has spent the last few days trying to secure Davis' release on a belief he has diplomatic immunity and that he was acting in self-defense.
    Davis is currently renting a home with his wife in Highlands Ranch and Davis' wife gave 9News a name and number she says she was instructed to give to reporters. The name is that of a government spokesperson and the number is in Washington, D.C.

    Public records checked by The Denver Post indicate Davis, 36, and his wife have lived in Highlands Ranch since August, and he has previously lived in Las Vegas, Lexington, Kent., Vail, Ariz., Fort Bragg, N.C., and other previous locations.

    His is listed as the managing drector of Hyperion Security Services LLC since April 2008, and the business address was the same as Davis' home in Arizona.

    Its online business profile says Hyperion is engaged in "detective, guard and armored car services" and employees two people.
    Pakistani media is covering the case extensively and multiple, sizeable rallies have been held inside Pakistan calling on the Pakistani government not to release Davis to the American government. One Pakistani newspaper has repeatedly called Davis "an American Rambo."
    A spokesperson for the U.S. State Department refused to confirm the man's identity but said the U.S. government is currently trying to bring the man home.

    Denver Post staff writer Joey Bunch contributed to this story.
     
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  3. kickok1975

    kickok1975 Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    Rebecca Davis, 44, laughs while talking with the media in Highlands Ranch on Wednesday. Her husband, Raymond Davism was released from prison in Pakistan after being pardoned by the families of two men after Davis shot and killed them during an alleged robbery attempt. (AP | Chris Schneider)
     
  4. kickok1975

    kickok1975 Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    Wife: Freed CIA contractor 'is not a killer'

    HIGHLANDS RANCH, Colo.—The wife of the CIA contractor released from jail in Pakistan on Wednesday said she is confident her husband acted in self-defense when he shot and killed two Pakistani men, and she knew he would be released eventually.
    "If he says self-defense, I believe self-defense," Rebecca Davis said outside her home in the south Denver suburbs.
    "My husband is not a killer. He's not Rambo," she said.
    Raymond Allen Davis was freed and left Pakistan after more than $2 million in "blood money" was paid to the families of the men who were killed on Jan. 27. The U.S. government described the men as robbers.
    Rebecca Davis said she did not know how much money had been paid or who came up with it.
    "I trust my husband, I trust the government, I trust the training. And I believed in my gut from day one that he was OK and it was just going to take time," she said.
    Rebecca Davis described her husband as "very cool-headed, even-tempered, highly trained."
    Davis said she got letters from him but wasn't able to speak to him while he was incarcerated.
    "He was healthy, exercising, reading, playing cribbage, (practicing) origami," she said. For their anniversary, he sent her what she described as a perfect origami crane. "So I think he had lots of time to work on it. It was beautiful."
    His letters described feeling like a caged tiger. "It wasn't a pleasant thing," she said, "but it could have been so much worse."
    Rebecca Davis appeared upbeat, even buoyant. She joked that when she first heard he was released after a payment, she thought, "That's it? That's all he's worth?" But she reiterated that she didn't know any details of the transaction.
    Davis said she got the news in two phone calls at about 6:30 a.m. Wednesday and a visitor to her home. She declined to identify the callers or the visitor.
    She fought back tears when describing the support and steady updates she got from the U.S. government, again declining to identify who had contacted her.
    She said she kept up her routine while her husband was detained, even attending a music class and getting her 2 1/2-year-old son to a school Wednesday morning after getting the news of her husband's release.
    Rebecca Davis said she and her husband are both former soldiers who met while they were in the Army. She said she knew something of his current work but not everything.
    "It's always in the back of your mind that something like this could happen," she said.
    Asked if she thought he would continue his line of work, she said she didn't know. But she said he is "all about his country" and described him as a soldier, even though he is apparently no longer in the Army.
    "One thing my husband is, he's a soldier," Rebecca Davis said. "Country first. Well, God first, and then country."
    She said she doesn't expect to see him before this weekend, because he'll need to be de-briefed first. She doesn't know where they'll reunite.
     

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