Western Wars For Christianity

Discussion in 'Religion & Culture' started by hello_10, Apr 14, 2013.

  1. hello_10

    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

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    Millions of Evangelical Christians Want to Start World War III … to Speed Up the Second Coming

    But millions of Americans believe that Christ will not come again until Israel wipes out its competitors and there is widespread war in the Middle East. Some of these folks want to start a huge fire of war and death and destruction, so that Jesus comes quickly.

    According to French President Chirac, Bush told him that the Iraq war was needed to bring on the apocalypse:

    In Genesis and Ezekiel Gog and Magog are forces of the Apocalypse who are prophesied to come out of the north and destroy Israel unless stopped. The Book of Revelation took up the Old Testament prophesy:

    “And when the thousand years are expired, Satan shall be loosed out of his prison, And shall go out to deceive the nations which are in the four quarters of the earth, Gog and Magog, to gather them together to battle and fire came down from God out of heaven, and devoured them.”


    Bush believed the time had now come for that battle, telling Chirac:

    “This confrontation is willed by God, who wants to use this conflict to erase his people’s enemies before a New Age begins”…


    There can be little doubt now that President Bush’s reason for launching the war in Iraq was, for him, fundamentally religious. He was driven by his belief that the attack on Saddam’s Iraq was the fulfilment of a Biblical prophesy in which he had been chosen to serve as the instrument of the Lord.


    And British Prime Minister Tony Blair long-time mentor, advisor and confidante said:

    “Tony’s Christian faith is part of him, down to his cotton socks. He believed strongly at the time, that intervention in Kosovo, Sierra Leone – Iraq too – was all part of the Christian battle; good should triumph over evil, making lives better.
    ”


    Mr Burton, who was often described as Mr Blair’s mentor, says that his religion gave him a “total belief in what’s right and what’s wrong”, leading him to see the so-called War on Terror as “a moral cause”…

    Anti-war campaigners criticised remarks Mr Blair made in 2006, suggesting that the decision to go to war in Iraq would ultimately be judged by God.

    Bill Moyers reports that the organization Christians United for Israel – led by highly-influential Pastor John C. Hagee – is a universal call to all Christians to help factions in Israel fund the Jewish settlements, throw out all the Palestinians and lobby for a pre-emptive invasion of Iran. All to bring Russia into a war against us causing World War III followed by Armageddon, the Second Coming and The Rapture. See this and this.

    This all revolves around what is called Dispensationalism. So popular is Dispensationalism that Tim LaHaye’s Left Behind series has sold 65 million copies.


    Dispensationalists include the following mega-pastors and their churches:

    â– Jerry Falwell
    â– Pat Robertson
    â– Billy Graham


    They are supported by politicians such as:

    â– Newt Gingrich
    â– Joseph Lieberman
    â– John McCain
    â– Texas Senator John Cronyn
    â– Former House Minority Whip Roy Blunt
    â– Former House Majority Leader Tom DeLay
    â– And others

    Dr. Timothy Webber – an evangelical Christian who has served as a teacher of church history and the history of American religion at Denver Seminary and Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Vice-President at Northern Baptist Theological Seminary in Lombard, IL, and President of Memphis Theological Seminary in Tennessee – notes:

    In a recent Time/CNN poll, more than one-third of Americans said that since the terrorist attacks of 9/11, they have been thinking more about how current events might be leading to the end of the world.

    While only 36 percent of all Americans believe that the Bible is God’s Word and should be taken literally, 59 percent say they believe that events predicted in the Book of Revelation will come to pass. Almost one out of four Americans believes that 9/11 was predicted in the Bible, and nearly one in five believes that he or she will live long enough to see the end of the world. Even more significant for this study, over one-third of those Americans who support Israel report that they do so because they believe the Bible teaches that the Jews must possess their own country in the Holy Land before Jesus can return.

    Millions of Americans believe that the Bible predicts the future and that we are living in the last days. Their beliefs are rooted in dispensationalism, a particular way of understanding the Bible’s prophetic passages, especially those in Daniel and Ezekiel in the Old Testament and the Book of Revelation in the New Testament. They make up about one-third of America’s 40 or 50 million evangelical Christians and believe that the nation of Israel will play a central role in the unfolding of end-times events. In the last part of the 20th century, dispensationalist evangelicals become Israel’s best friends-an alliance that has made a serious geopolitical difference.

    Evangelical Christians Want to Start WWIII to Speed the "Second Coming" ... and Atheist Neocons are Using Religion to Rile Them Up to Justify War Against Iran
     
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  3. hello_10

    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

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    here, from 2.50min onward, if we try to make sense of the soldier's instructor then he clearly means to say to the US's soldiers that they are fighting for Christianity in Afghan and its their duty to serve Jesus. a clear sense, as explained in the same video after that also

     
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    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

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    in fact, US is habituated of organising wars for Christianity on time to time, see during Iraq War also as below:

     
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    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

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    For Christians, Vietnam war rages

    Vietnam’s “hidden” war on Christianity just rumbles along, and on March 13, the communist authorities demolished one of the first Christian churches built in Vietnam’s Central Highlands. While religious persecution is nothing new to Vietnam, the significance of this demolition is particularly symbolic because the church was more than a historical landmark. The large stone Church at Buon Ma Thuot for the last 34 years had been deliberately closed by Vietnam’s security police, and yet, all those years, the church remained a powerful symbol to the local indigenous Christians.

    Unfortunately, the church was also an unwelcome reminder for the communists who had murdered a number of Christian missionaries near the grounds in 1968, and a reminder of the very movement the government is trying to eliminate. This movement, so hated by Hanoi, is nothing other than “independent” Christian house churches.

    Thus, in the dead of night, with security forces keeping watch, heavy machinery came and brought the historic church toppling down. Word of this spread, and in mourning the loss on May 1, some 90,000 Degar Montagnards from 375 villages stopped everything and prayed for three days and nights. Security forces responded by making dozens of arrests of these tribal Christians, threatening them to cease their religious activities.

    This repression against Christians in Vietnam is decades old, and it was in 2004 that the U.S. State Department first added Vietnam to the “Country of Particular Concern” (CPC) designation, the official “watch list” of nations that commit serious religious persecution. Potentially, CPC designation involves sanctions being imposed on such countries. However, after negotiations with Hanoi, the CPC designation was removed as the communist authorities “promised” to undertake religious reforms, including stopping forced renunciations of faith, an actual policy directed against tribal Christians.

    Today, however, the question remains whether Vietnam everintended to honor such reforms and whether the State Department conveniently accepted Hanoi’s dubious promises in order to gain trade, military and diplomatic relations. If the State Department did so, it is clear the Degar Montagnards - who were America’s loyal allies during the Vietnam War - have been relegated to little or no importance. U.S. Ambassador to Vietnam Michael W. Michalak recently rejected calls by the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom (USCIRF) to put Vietnam back on the CPC watch list. He cited that there was not enough evidence of religious persecution.

    Yet we know the European Parliament confirmed a Degar Montagnard woman named “Puih Hbat” was arrested in April 2008 for leading prayer services in her house. Not only did the Europeans confirm that this woman had been sentenced to five years imprisonment for this “crime,” but also that this very information had been given to them by U.S. Embassy officials. “Puih Hbat” is a 42-year-old mother of five children, and her family fears that she may have been killed in custody.

    It wouldn’t be the first Degar Montagnard killed by Vietnam’s security forces, and it wouldn’t be the first such killing acknowledged by the State Department. In fact, the State Department has confirmed the killings of Degar Montagnards such as “Y Ngo Adrong” in 2006 and “Y Ben Hdok” in 2008. They also reported that killings of tribal Christians by Vietnam’s security forces on Easter 2004 reached casualty figures at least in “double digit figures.”

    If the imprisonment of “Puih Hbat” and the above killings are not evidence of persecution, what then of the hundreds of confirmed Degar Montagnards now rotting in Vietnam’s jails? Human Rights Watch, Amnesty International and the USCIRF all report that hundreds of Montagnards are currently imprisoned under Vietnam’s authoritarian laws. These laws are vaguely defined as crimes of “undermining state unity,” which, in reality, means the Degar Montagnards were imprisoned for crimes relating to religious freedom and free speech.

    The evidence today suggests that not only is religious persecution continuing in Vietnam, but also that Hanoi has merely changed tactics in persecuting Christians. Since being dropped from the CPC designation in 2006, hundreds - if not thousands - of Degar Christians have been arrested, beaten and threatened in what appears a policy to repress the house churches from expanding membership. It is estimated that during the past decade, Protestant congregations have grown 600 percent in Vietnam, a statistic that has greatly alarmed communist officials.

    Today, “forced renunciations” have been replaced by control mechanisms - namely, torture, beatings, imprisonment and killings. Instead of forcing Christians to renounce their faith, Vietnamese authorities force Degar Montagnards to join “government-approved” churches, such as the Evangelical Church of Vietnam - South (ECVN-S), where Christians can be watched, controlled and, if need be, arrested and imprisoned like “Puih Hbat.” In other words, “You can be a Christian, but you must be ourChristian.”

    Persecution is nothing new to the Degar Montagnards, and when the Vietnam War ended, the communists unleashed a brutal revenge against them that reads like a blueprint for ethnic cleansing. It started with the execution and imprisonment of their leaders and pastors. The Degar Montagnards were also subjected to forced relocations and driven off their ancestral lands. Today, they have been pushed into a life of poverty, and their once-great forests virtually clear-felled by logging companies. In the words of Human Rights Watch, “The Montagnards have been repressed for decades.”

    The Vietnam War saw an estimated 40,000 Degar Montagnards serving with American forces at any one time, and by the end of the conflict, some 200,000 of these people, a quarter of their population, had perished. The late Ed Sprague, former U.S. Special Forces soldier and Foreign Service officer, who served with the Montagnards for seven years, summed up their role stating, “There was a dual love - we loved them and they loved us, and they saved a lot of American lives.”

    In Washington today, however, the Degar Montagnards have been conveniently forgotten. The historical role they played in the Vietnam War, their sacrifice and their loyalty to the United States are practically unheard of. Only a few members of Congress have ever raised their issue, and the Obama administration seems about as interested today in hearing about Degar Montagnards as the communists are in Hanoi.

    On June 8, the United States and Vietnam held a joint “Political, Security and Defense Dialogue,” and Acting Assistant Secretary of State for Political-Military Affairs Greg Delawie stated, “The Obama administration has placed a strong emphasis on engaging with and listening to our partners in the region.”

    Of course, there was no mention of America’s former allies, the Degar Montagnards.

    Scott Johnson is a lawyer, writer and human rights activist. He co-writes the Powerline.com blog.

    For Christians, Vietnam war rages - Washington Times
     
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    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

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    and here we have a news about Western Religious War for Christianity, as below: :ranger:

     
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    and thats how things going on in Australia, where the local Indigenous people are converting into Islam to resist Western aggression towards them.... as below:

     
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    Vietnam Persecutes Christian Minority
    March 31, 2011

    BANGKOK — Vietnam has increased repression of indigenous minority Christians in the country’s Central Highlands, closing small informal churches, compelling public renunciations of faith and arresting worshipers, Human Rights Watch said in a report on Thursday.

    The hill tribe minorities, known as Montagnards, are traditionally animist but have been converted to Christianity in large numbers over the past half-century. Culturally and ethnically distinct from the majority lowland Vietnamese, the believers worship clandestinely in informal settings known as house churches, which are illegal under Vietnamese law.

    “Montagnards face harsh persecution in Vietnam, particularly those who worship in independent house churches, because the authorities don’t tolerate religious activity outside their sight or control,” said Phil Robertson, deputy Asia director of the human rights monitoring group, which is based in New York. “The Vietnamese government has been steadily tightening the screws on independent Montagnard religious groups, claiming they are using religion to incite unrest.”

    The conflicts involve more than religion as Vietnam’s population and economy expand and lowland Vietnamese settlers encroach on the farmland of indigenous hill tribes, primarily with agricultural plantations.

    There is a political aspect as well, involving government concerns over links with evangelical groups in the United States among some of the Montagnards. Many Montagnards fought alongside American and South Vietnamese troops during the Vietnam War, and some continued to resist after the Communist victory in 1975. :meeting:

    For the most part, Montagnard Christians today are nonpolitical, but the government is particularly concerned about a branch known as Dega Christianity, which is associated with a movement for land rights.

    The United States designated Vietnam as a “country of particular concern” for religious freedom in 2004 but removed it from the list two years later, saying it was satisfied with the government’s moves to loosen restrictions.

    Officially atheist, Communist Vietnam started allowing religious practice in the early 1990s. Mostly Buddhist by tradition, it also has a Roman Catholic population that is the largest in Southeast Asia outside the Philippines. Buddhist temples are packed during festivals, and churches sometimes overflow with worshipers on Sundays and at Easter and Christmas.
    But under Vietnamese law, religious groups must register with the government and operate under approved guidelines. When the government gave official sanction to some evangelical Protestant churches a decade ago, almost none of the 400 churches in the Central Highlands were included.

    Independent unregistered groups often come under harsh government pressure. They include unapproved or independent congregations of Mennonites, Cao Dai, Hoa Hao Buddhists, ethnic Khmer Theravada Buddhists and members of the Unified Buddhist Church of Vietnam, as well as the Montagnard Christians.

    The police and local officials disperse their religious gatherings, confiscate religious literature and summon religious leaders to police stations for interrogation. In some instances, police officers destroy the churches of unauthorized groups and detain or imprison their members on charges of violating national security.

    “The United States government should recognize this and should clearly designate Vietnam as a country of particular concern for violations of religious freedom,” Mr. Robertson said. “I think the facts demand it. The situation with the Montagnards is one of the most egregious violations of religious freedom in Vietnam.”

    The Central Highlands are mostly off limits to journalists and independent rights groups. The report said much of its information came from the official news media as well as from asylum seekers who had fled through the mountains to neighboring Cambodia and from overseas Montagnard advocacy groups.

    The Vietnamese news media are remarkably forthright about the pressure on the Montagnards, Mr. Robertson said.

    The Human Rights Watch report quoted one Vietnamese press report, in Bao Gia Lai, a state newspaper in Gia Lai Province, as saying: “After attempting to organize violent protests at various locations in the highlands and facing continued failure, some helpless leaders fled into the forest. But the sacred wood and untamed water could not protect them.”

    It quoted Voice of Vietnam radio as saying, “When a so-called religion becomes a tool in the hands of evil people, it should be considered evil and unlawful and should be eliminated.”

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/01/world/asia/01vietnam.html
     
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    and Western deeds in Africa is stated as below: :ranger:

     
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    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

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    and this is how non-Christian religions dominated the past, till the 18th century, and again they are going to get their previous state with fast pace growth rate


    and this was the state of Christian religious British till the 17th century, before they came to India, as below: :ranger:

     
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    here I would like to share my personal experience while living in Western Nations too..... if you ask a Western girl, "what if you get pregnant?" then they generally answer, "he/she will be one like Jesus..." first West claim that Jesus directly came from sky while their women give example of mother of Jesus to justify/ give social certificate to the kids they get by casual sex from different men.......:toilet:

    hence its clear that this "Single Mother Culture" is nothing but a "tool" to spread Christianity among the non-Christian men.... :ranger:

    and finally hard working migrants have to pay for this generation of Single Mothers of those Western Men, who fcuk and throw their women on the tax money of others :tsk:

     
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    Christianity Grows in Afghanistan, Despite Islamists’ Threat

    The negative and suspicious view of Afghanis towards Christian activities has caused Christian groups and individuals, including Christians with an Islamic background, to be targeted in this war-torn country.

    According to a story by the Iranian Christian news agency Mohabat News, Christian evangelism has turned into a sensitive and complicated issue in the last 10 years. Muslims target Christians every day. They use the Islamic Sharia Law to charge Christians with blasphemy.

    The rate of growth of Christianity in Afghanistan has caused Afghani Muslim clerics to consider it a threat. Also according to reports by news services, Afghani Muslim clerics warned the country's government against the spread of Christianity.

    Mohabat News said the Islamic council of Afghanistan, compprised of Islamic seminary students and clerics from all around the country, called on Hamid Karzai to limit the number of aid-workers and Christian missionaries coming to Afghanistan, because they can cause Afghans to convert to Christianity.

    Mohammad Hanif Atmar, the interior minister, appeared in the Afghanistan Parliament in May 2011. He said, “There are evidences of Christian evangelism in the country.”

    Mohabat News said he added, “The activities in this field might be ‘broad.’”

    According to Mohabat News, this anti-Christian wave was sparked after a private Kabul-based TV channel reported a number of Afghans had converted to Christianity and aired their pictures praying and being baptized.

    The TV channel also claimed that some foreign non-government organizations are involved in promoting Christianity in the country. This provoked parliamentary members' anger.

    Mohabat News said some of the members of parliament even asked to prosecute perpetrators of Christian evangelism in Afghanistan and convict them under Sharia Law.

    According to Sharia Law and Afghanistan's judicial system, which Mohabat News said is mostly based on Islamic laws, if someone leaves Islam and converts to another religion he or she could be executed.

    In addition, hundreds of Afghani university students, professors and Islamic experts protested against Christian evangelism in Kapisa province, in eastern Afghanistan. Mohabat News said protestors called on the Afghani government “to deal with those who promote Christianity in Afghanistan and deceive Muslims.”

    In addition, Hamid Karzai denounced some foreign institutions' evangelical operations among Afghani youth, and called for actions against these institutions.

    Mohabat News said some Afghani domestic media mentioned a lack of seriousness from the government towards those who have converted to Christianity as a reason for youth to embrace Christianity.

    Those media wrote, “If sacred Islamic rulings were implemented against people like Abdul-Rahman and Amin Mousavi, today nobody would consider converting to Christianity.”

    Mohabat News said the execution of apostates is one of the controversial issues that have made their way into Afghani media.

    Mohabat News said the threat that exists against Afghani Christians should not be trivialized. Changing one's religion is considered a crime that is punishable by death in Afghanistan. As a result, Afghani Christians are constantly being targeted by Muslim extremists and the government.

    According to Mohabat News, a video was released in 2011 showing Islamists beheading an Afghani Christian and quoting the Mohammad as saying, “Whoever changes their religion must be killed.”

    Islamists strike on Christians in Afghanistan

    Mohabat News said the Government of Afghanistan arrested 24 Christian missionaries who were serving in humanitarian aid institutions in 2001. All arrested missionaries were released in November of the same year at the request of the international community.

    Mohabat News said another controversial Christian persecution case was against Abdul-Rahman, an Afghani citizen. Abdul-Rahman's Christian faith was revealed in Feb. 2006. He was arrested by police and later sentenced to death for apostasy. Then Afghani officials announced that he was temporarily released due to a “mental disorder.” After being temporarily released, Abdul-Rahman left Afghanistan and took refuge in Italy.

    In another case, Mohabat News said, three South-Korean citizens were kidnaped by Taliban militants in July 2008. Two of them were killed before negotiations between Taliban and South Korean officials, and the other was released after a ransom was paid.

    In Sept. 2008, Islamic experts of the district of Jaghori arrested a religion teacher, Amin Mousavi, who was allegedly promoting Christianity. The Islamic experts sentenced the teacher to death, but later he was released and fled the country.

    On May 31 2010, Mohabat News reported, a 45-year-old Afghan Christian, Saeid Mousa who was physically disabled and wearing an artificial leg, was arrested because of his Christian faith.

    Shoaib Assadullah was imprisoned on Oct. 21 2010 after he handed a Bible to someone who later reported him to Afghani authorities.

    Mohabat News said most probably, institutions and organizations that are in direct contact with Afghani Christians have a more complete list of persecutions against Christians in this strictly Muslim nation. However, those referred to are examples.

    In addition, Mohabat News reported, Afghani Christians are not safe from the hands of Muslim extremists even outside their country. An Afghani Christian convert was burnt by hot water and acid last September in a center for refugees in Norway. The offenders told the man, “If you don't return to Islam we will kill you.”

    According to a report by the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom, the last church building in Afghanistan was destroyed in March 2010, and currently not even one Christian school exists in the country.

    Today, the society in which people are raised with extreme Islamic thoughts from birth, is facing a deep change in its people's religious attitudes. Mohabat News said knowledgeable officials of the country acknowledge that Christianity has found a special place not only among youth but also among other members of Afghani society. House churches are also growing rapidly.

    Christianity has spread not only among ordinary Afghans but also among Afghani elites and well-known figures.

    Mohabat News said Afghan Telex News Service published a report on the conversion of some members of the Afghani Parliament to Christianity. It read in part, “Evangelism and Christian propaganda is spreading in the country at a high level, but this is the first time that those who call themselves representatives of the Afghani people not only have become ‘apostates,’ but have joined Christian ministries to evangelize.”

    According to human rights advocacy groups, Mohabat News reported, at least tens of thousands of Christian converts are living inside Afghanistan, despite persecution.

    Christianity Grows in Afghanistan, Despite Islamists’ Threat
     
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    The Crusade for a Christian Military, the US/NATO forces
    DEMOCRACY NOW! -

    The military is denying it allows its soldiers to proselytize to Afghans, following the release of footage showing US soldiers in Afghanistan discussing how to distribute Bibles translated into Pashto and Dari. We speak to Air Force veteran and former Reagan administration counsel Mikey Weinstein, founder of the Military Religious Freedom Foundation, and journalist Jeff Sharlet, author of a Harper’s Magazine article on “The Crusade for a Christian Military.”

    The former prime minister of Afghanistan Ahmed Shah Ahmedzai has called for an investigation into allegations that US soldiers are trying to convert Afghans to Christianity, saying: “This is a complete deviation from what they are supposed to be doing.”

    His comments come after a report on Al Jazeera showed footage of soldiers at Bagram air base discussing how to distribute Bibles translated into Pashto and Dari. The US military is denying it allows its soldiers to proselytize to Afghans. The military claims the Bibles shown in the video had been confiscated and destroyed and were “never distributed.” Admiral Mike Mullen told a Pentagon briefing Monday: “It certainly is, from the United States military’s perspective, not our position to ever push any specific kind of religion, period.”

    The Pentagon has also sharply criticized Al Jazeera for releasing the year-old footage which was shot by filmmaker and former soldier Brian Hughes. Military spokesperson Colonel Greg Julian said: “Most of this is taken out of context. This is irresponsible and inappropriate journalism. There is no effort to go out and proselytize to Afghans."

    On Tuesday, Al Jazeera released unedited footage of the US soldiers’ bible study in Bagram to counter the Pentagon"s allegations. These excerpts from the unedited video show military chaplain Captain Emmit Furner leading the discussion on the definition of the US Central Command’s General Order Number One that explicitly forbids active duty troops from trying to convert people to any religion.

    Excerpts of Al Jazeera footage.

    I’m joined now by two guests who have closely followed this story. Jeff Sharlet is a contributing editor for Harper’s Magazine and joins me from Rochester, New York. He is author of “The Family: The Secret Fundamentalism at the Heart of American Power” which is coming out in paperback next month. His latest article is the cover story of the May issue of Harper’s magazine. Its called “Jesus Killed Mohammed: The Crusade for a Christian Military.”

    We’re also joined from Albuquerque, New Mexico by Mikey Weinstein, an Air Force veteran and founder of the Military Religious Freedom Foundation. A registered Republican, he served as legal counsel to the Reagan administration for three years and is the author of “With God On Our Side: One Man’s War Against an Evangelical Coup in America’s Military.”

    We spoke with Colonel Greg Julian in Afghanistan and invited him on the program but he declined to join us.

    Jeff Sharlet, contributing editor for Harper’s Magazine. He is author of The Family: The Secret Fundamentalism at the Heart of American Power, which is coming out in paperback next month.

    Mikey Weinstein, Air Force veteran and founder of the Military Religious Freedom Foundation. A registered Republican, he served as legal counsel to the Reagan administration for three years. He is the author of With God on Our Side: One Man’s War Against an Evangelical Coup in America’s Military.

    DEMOCRACY NOW! -

    DEMOCRACY NOW! -
     
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    Vietnam war rumbles on, Christians branded 'the enemy'
    March 30, 2008

    Release International has completed a fact-finding visit and finds the Vietnam War is still rumbling on - with Christians now regarded as the enemy, says one of the leading persecution watchdogs, Release International.

    Christians in Vietnam are being targeted as 'agents of America'. They describe torture and near starvation as the authorities threaten to kill them slowly.


    Prisoners' wives and a former prisoner have been describing the way Christians from Vietnam's tribal highlands are routinely beaten, tortured and starved behind bars - in a land which supposedly guarantees freedom of religion.

    'Esther' and 'Deborah' and former prisoner 'Silas' have been telling Release International about the ordeal suffered in jail by Christians calling for true freedom of worship and the return of land seized by the authorities. They tell their story in the latest edition of the webcast World Update on the Persecuted Church, available on Release International - Home Page

    They travelled hundreds of miles and have taken a great risk to explode the myth of freedom of religion in Vietnam and to call for prayer and support for Christian prisoners.

    Esther described how they set about 'Abraham', her husband, with a wooden club spiked with two long nails. Then they turned a snarling Alsatian on him, before lashing his unconscious body to their Jeep and dragging it along the road.

    When they finally permitted Esther to see her husband she says: "He could not recognise me. He was like a dumb man. They had beaten him in the face and broken his jaw. He could not talk."

    Esther and Abraham are Christians, from one of the mountain tribes of Vietnam.

    "My husband requested freedom for the tribal people, and freedom to worship God." Esther explains. "And he asked for this publicly."

    'Job', another Christian prisoner, also called for freedom of worship - a freedom guaranteed under Vietnamese law.

    Despite those legal guarantees, the authorities closed Job's village church and confiscated their land - measures commonplace in the tribal highlands of Vietnam, where unregistered Christians are regarded with suspicion as enemy agents working to undermine communism.

    They accused Job of being involved with separatists, tortured him to extract a confession and threw him behind bars.

    Vietnam war rumbles on, Christians branded 'the enemy' | Christian News on Christian Today
     
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    Vietnam Civilian Killings Went Unpunished
    uploaded 08 Aug 2006

    Declassified papers show U.S. atrocities went far beyond My Lai.

    by Nick Turse and Deborah Nelson

    The men of B Company were in a dangerous state of mind. They had lost five men in a firefight the day before. The morning of Feb. 8, 1968, brought unwelcome orders to resume their sweep of the countryside, a green patchwork of rice paddies along Vietnam's central coast.

    They met no resistance as they entered a nondescript settlement in Quang Nam province. So Jamie Henry, a 20-year-old medic, set his rifle down in a hut, unfastened his bandoliers and lighted a cigarette.

    Just then, the voice of a lieutenant crackled across the radio. He reported that he had rounded up 19 civilians, and wanted to know what to do with them. Henry later recalled the company commander's response:

    Kill anything that moves.

    Henry stepped outside the hut and saw a small crowd of women and children. Then the shooting began.
    Moments later, the 19 villagers lay dead or dying.

    Back home in California, Henry published an account of the slaughter and held a news conference to air his allegations. Yet he and other Vietnam veterans who spoke out about war crimes were branded traitors and fabricators. No one was ever prosecuted for the massacre.

    Now, nearly 40 years later, declassified Army files show that Henry was telling the truth — about the Feb. 8 killings and a series of other atrocities by the men of B Company.

    The files are part of a once-secret archive, assembled by a Pentagon task force in the early 1970s, that shows that confirmed atrocities by U.S. forces in Vietnam were more extensive than was previously known.

    The documents detail 320 alleged incidents that were substantiated by Army investigators — not including the most notorious U.S. atrocity, the 1968 My Lai massacre.

    Though not a complete accounting of Vietnam war crimes, the archive is the largest such collection to surface to date. About 9,000 pages, it includes investigative files, sworn statements by witnesses and status reports for top military brass.

    The records describe recurrent attacks on ordinary Vietnamese — families in their homes, farmers in rice paddies, teenagers out fishing. Hundreds of soldiers, in interviews with investigators and letters to commanders, described a violent minority who murdered, raped and tortured with impunity.

    Abuses were not confined to a few rogue units, a Times review of the files found. They were uncovered in every Army division that operated in Vietnam.

    Retired Brig. Gen. John H. Johns, a Vietnam veteran who served on the task force, says he once supported keeping the records secret but now believes they deserve wide attention in light of alleged attacks on civilians and abuse of prisoners in Iraq.

    "We can't change current practices unless we acknowledge the past," says Johns, 78.
    Among the substantiated cases in the archive:

    • Seven massacres from 1967 through 1971 in which at least 137 civilians died.
    • Seventy-eight other attacks on noncombatants in which at least 57 were killed, 56 wounded and 15 sexually assaulted.
    • One hundred forty-one instances in which U.S. soldiers tortured civilian detainees or prisoners of war with fists, sticks, bats, water or electric shock.

    Investigators determined that evidence against 203 soldiers accused of harming Vietnamese civilians or prisoners was strong enough to warrant formal charges. These "founded" cases were referred to the soldiers' superiors for action.
    Ultimately, 57 of them were court-martialed and just 23 convicted, the records show.

    Fourteen received prison sentences ranging from six months to 20 years, but most won significant reductions on appeal. The stiffest sentence went to a military intelligence interrogator convicted of committing indecent acts on a 13-year-old girl in an interrogation hut in 1967.

    He served seven months of a 20-year term, the records show.

    Many substantiated cases were closed with a letter of reprimand, a fine or, in more than half the cases, no action at all.
    There was little interest in prosecuting Vietnam war crimes, says Steven Chucala, who in the early 1970s was legal advisor to the commanding officer of the Army's Criminal Investigation Division. He says he disagreed with the attitude but understood it.
    "Everyone wanted Vietnam to go away," says Chucala, now a civilian attorney for the Army at Ft. Belvoir in Virginia.

    In many cases, suspects had left the service. The Army did not attempt to pursue them, despite a written opinion in 1969 by Robert E. Jordan III, then the Army's general counsel, that ex-soldiers could be prosecuted through courts-martial, military commissions or tribunals.

    "I don't remember why it didn't go anywhere," says Jordan, now a lawyer in Washington.
    Top Army brass should have demanded a tougher response, says retired Lt. Gen. Robert G. Gard, who oversaw the task force as a brigadier general at the Pentagon in the early 1970s.

    "We could have court-martialed them but didn't," Gard says of soldiers accused of war crimes. "The whole thing is terribly disturbing."

    Early-Warning System

    In March 1968, members of the 23rd Infantry Division slaughtered about 500 Vietnamese civilians in the hamlet of My Lai. Reporter Seymour Hersh exposed the massacre the following year.

    By then, Gen. William C. Westmoreland, commander of U.S. forces in Vietnam at the time of My Lai, had become Army chief of staff. A task force was assembled from members of his staff to monitor war crimes allegations and serve as an early-warning system.
    Over the next few years, members of the Vietnam War Crimes Working Group reviewed Army investigations and wrote reports and summaries for military brass and the White House.

    The records were declassified in 1994, after 20 years as required by law, and moved to the National Archives in College Park, Md., where they went largely unnoticed.

    The Times examined most of the files and obtained copies of about 3,000 pages — about a third of the total — before government officials removed them from the public shelves, saying they contained personal information that was exempt from the Freedom of Information Act.

    In addition to the 320 substantiated incidents, the records contain material related to more than 500 alleged atrocities that Army investigators could not prove or that they discounted.

    Johns says many war crimes did not make it into the archive. Some were prosecuted without being identified as war crimes, as required by military regulations. Others were never reported.

    In a letter to Westmoreland in 1970, an anonymous sergeant described widespread, unreported killings of civilians by members of the 9th Infantry Division in the Mekong Delta — and blamed pressure from superiors to generate high body counts.

    "A batalion [sic] would kill maybe 15 to 20 [civilians] a day. With 4 batalions in the brigade that would be maybe 40 to 50 a day or 1200 to 1500 a month, easy," the unnamed sergeant wrote. "If I am only 10% right, and believe me it's lots more, then I am trying to tell you about 120-150 murders, or a My Lay [sic] each month for over a year."

    A high-level Army review of the letter cited its "forcefulness," "sincerity" and "inescapable logic," and urged then-Secretary of the Army Stanley R. Resor to make sure the push for verifiable body counts did not "encourage the human tendency to inflate the count by violating established rules of engagement."

    Investigators tried to find the letter writer and "prevent his complaints from reaching" then-Rep. Ronald V. Dellums (D-Oakland), according to an August 1971 memo to Westmoreland.

    The records do not say whether the writer was located, and there is no evidence in the files that his complaint was investigated further.

    Pvt. Henry

    James D. "Jamie" Henry was 19 in March 1967, when the Army shaved his hippie locks and packed him off to boot camp.
    He had been living with his mother in Sonoma County, working as a hospital aide and moonlighting as a flower child in Haight-Ashbury, when he received a letter from his draft board. As thousands of hippies poured into San Francisco for the upcoming "Summer of Love," Henry headed for Ft. Polk, La.

    Soon he was on his way to Vietnam, part of a 100,000-man influx that brought U.S. troop strength to 485,000 by the end of 1967. They entered a conflict growing ever bloodier for Americans — 9,378 U.S. troops would die in combat in 1967, 87% more than the year before.

    Henry was a medic with B Company of the 1st Battalion, 35th Infantry, 4th Infantry Division. He described his experiences in a sworn statement to Army investigators several years later and in recent interviews with The Times.

    In the fall of 1967, he was on his first patrol, marching along the edge of a rice paddy in Quang Nam province, when the soldiers encountered a teenage girl.

    "The guy in the lead immediately stops her and puts his hand down her pants," Henry said. "I just thought, 'My God, what's going on?' "

    A day or two later, he saw soldiers senselessly stabbing a pig.

    "I talked to them about it, and they told me if I wanted to live very long, I should shut my mouth," he told Army investigators.
    Henry may have kept his mouth shut, but he kept his eyes and ears open.

    On Oct. 8, 1967, after a firefight near Chu Lai, members of his company spotted a 12-year-old boy out in a rainstorm. He was unarmed and clad only in shorts.

    "Somebody caught him up on a hill, and they brought him down and the lieutenant asked who wanted to kill him," Henry told investigators.

    Two volunteers stepped forward. One kicked the boy in the stomach. The other took him behind a rock and shot him, according to Henry's statement. They tossed his body in a river and reported him as an enemy combatant killed in action.

    Three days later, B Company detained and beat an elderly man suspected of supporting the enemy. He had trouble keeping pace as the soldiers marched him up a steep hill.

    "When I turned around, two men had him, one guy had his arms, one guy had his legs and they threw him off the hill onto a bunch of rocks," Henry's statement said.

    On Oct. 15, some of the men took a break during a large-scale "search-and-destroy" operation. Henry said he overheard a lieutenant on the radio requesting permission to test-fire his weapon, and went to see what was happening.

    He found two soldiers using a Vietnamese man for target practice, Henry said. They had discovered the victim sleeping in a hut and decided to kill him for sport.

    "Everybody was taking pot shots at him, seeing how accurate they were," Henry said in his statement.

    Back at base camp on Oct. 23, he said, members of the 1st Platoon told him they had ambushed five unarmed women and reported them as enemies killed in action. Later, members of another platoon told him they had seen the bodies.

    Tet Offensive

    Capt. Donald C. Reh, a 1964 graduate of West Point, took command of B Company in November 1967. Two months later, enemy forces launched a major offensive during Tet, the Vietnamese lunar New Year.

    In the midst of the fighting, on Feb. 7, the commander of the 1st Battalion, Lt. Col. William W. Taylor Jr., ordered an assault on snipers hidden in a line of trees in a rural area of Quang Nam province. Five U.S. soldiers were killed. The troops complained bitterly about the order and the deaths, Henry said.

    The next morning, the men packed up their gear and continued their sweep of the countryside. Soldiers discovered an unarmed man hiding in a hole and suspected that he had supported the enemy the previous day. A soldier pushed the man in front of an armored personnel carrier, Henry said in his statement.

    "They drove over him forward which didn't kill him because he was squirming around, so the APC backed over him again," Henry's statement said.

    Then B Company entered a hamlet to question residents and search for weapons. That's where Henry set down his weapon and lighted a cigarette in the shelter of a hut.

    A radio operator sat down next to him, and Henry was listening to the chatter. He heard the leader of the 3rd Platoon ask Reh for instructions on what to do with 19 civilians.

    "The lieutenant asked the captain what should be done with them. The captain asked the lieutenant if he remembered the op order (operation order) that came down that morning and he repeated the order which was 'kill anything that moves,' " Henry said in his statement. "I was a little shook … because I thought the lieutenant might do it."

    Henry said he left the hut and walked toward Reh. He saw the captain pick up the phone again, and thought he might rescind the order.

    Then soldiers pulled a naked woman of about 19 from a dwelling and brought her to where the other civilians were huddled, Henry aaid.

    "She was thrown to the ground," he said in his statement. "The men around the civilians opened fire and all on automatic or at least it seemed all on automatic. It was over in a few seconds. There was a lot of blood and flesh and stuff flying around….

    "I looked around at some of my friends and they all just had blank looks on their faces…. The captain made an announcement to all the company, I forget exactly what it was, but it didn't concern the people who had just been killed. We picked up our stuff and moved on."

    Henry didn't forget, however. "Thirty seconds after the shooting stopped," he said, "I knew that I was going to do something about it."

    Homecoming

    For his combat service, Henry earned a Bronze Star with a V for valor, and a Combat Medical Badge, among other awards. A fellow member of his unit said in a sworn statement that Henry regularly disregarded his own safety to save soldiers' lives, and showed "compassion and decency" toward enemy prisoners.

    When Henry finished his tour and arrived at Ft. Hood, Texas, in September 1968, he went to see an Army legal officer to report the atrocities he'd witnessed.

    The officer advised him to keep quiet until he got out of the Army, "because of the million and one charges you can be brought up on for blinking your eye," Henry says. Still, the legal officer sent him to see a Criminal Investigation Division agent.
    The agent was not receptive, Henry recalls.

    "He wanted to know what I was trying to pull, what I was trying to put over on people, and so I was just quiet. I told him I wouldn't tell him anything and I wouldn't say anything until I got out of the Army, and I left," Henry says.

    Honorably discharged in March 1969, Henry moved to Canoga Park, enrolled in community college and helped organize a campus chapter of Vietnam Veterans Against the War.

    Then he ended his silence: He published his account of the massacre in the debut issue of Scanlan's Monthly, a short-lived muckraking magazine, which hit the newsstands on Feb. 27, 1970. Henry held a news conference the same day at the Los Angeles Press Club.

    Records show that an Army operative attended incognito, took notes and reported back to the Pentagon.
    A faded copy of Henry's brief statement, retrieved from the Army's files, begins:

    "On February 8, 1968, nineteen (19) women and children were murdered in Viet-Nam by members of 3rd Platoon, 'B' Company, 1st Battalion, 35th Infantry….

    "Incidents similar to those I have described occur on a daily basis and differ one from the other only in terms of numbers killed," he told reporters. A brief article about his remarks appeared inside the Los Angeles Times the next day.

    Army investigators interviewed Henry the day after the news conference. His sworn statement filled 10 single-spaced typed pages. Henry did not expect anything to come of it: "I never got the impression they were ever doing anything."

    In 1971, Henry joined more than 100 other veterans at the Winter Soldier Investigation, a forum on war crimes sponsored by Vietnam Veterans Against the War.

    The FBI put the three-day gathering at a Detroit hotel under surveillance, records show, and Nixon administration officials worked behind the scenes to discredit the speakers as impostors and fabricators.

    Although the administration never publicly identified any fakers, one of the organization's leaders admitted exaggerating his rank and role during the war, and a cloud descended on the entire gathering.

    "We tried to get as much publicity as we could, and it just never went anywhere," Henry says. "Nothing ever happened."
    After years of dwelling on the war, he says, he "finally put it in a closet and shut the door."

    The Investigation

    Unknown to Henry, Army investigators pursued his allegations, tracking down members of his old unit over the next 3 1/2 years.
    Witnesses described the killing of the young boy, the old man tossed over the cliff, the man used for target practice, the five unarmed women, the man thrown beneath the armored personnel carrier and other atrocities.

    Their statements also provided vivid corroboration of the Feb. 8, 1968, massacre from men who had observed the day's events from various vantage points.

    Staff Sgt. Wilson Bullock told an investigator at Ft. Carson, Colo., that his platoon had captured 19 "women, children, babies and two or three very old men" during the Tet offensive.

    "All of these people were lined up and killed," he said in a sworn statement. "When it, the shooting, stopped, I began to return to the site when I observed a naked Vietnamese female run from the house to the huddle of people, saw that her baby had been shot. She picked the baby up and was then shot and the baby shot again."

    Gregory Newman, another veteran of B Company, told an investigator at Ft. Myer, Va., that Capt. Reh had issued an order "to search and destroy and kill anything in the village that moved."

    Newman said he was carrying out orders to kill the villagers' livestock when he saw a naked girl head toward a group of civilians.
    "I saw them begging before they were shot," he recalled in a sworn statement.

    Donald R. Richardson said he was at a command post outside the hamlet when he heard a platoon leader on the radio ask what to do with 19 civilians.

    "The cpt said something about kill anything that moves and the lt on the other end said 'Their [sic] moving,' " according to Richardson's sworn account. "Just then the gunfire was heard."

    William J. Nieset, a rifle squad leader, told investigators that he was standing next to a radio operator and heard Reh say: "My instructions from higher are to kill everything that moves."

    Robert D. Miller said he was the radio operator for Lt. Johnny Mack Carter, commander of the 3rd Platoon. Miller said that when Carter asked Reh what to do with the 19 civilians, the captain instructed him to follow the "operation order."

    Carter immediately sought two volunteers to shoot the civilians, Miller said under oath.
    "I believe everyone knew what was going to happen," he said, "so no one volunteered except one guy known only to me as 'Crazy.' "

    "A few minutes later, while the Vietnamese were huddled around in a circle Lt Carter and 'Crazy' started shooting them with their M-16's on automatic," Miller's statement says.

    Carter had just left active duty when an investigator questioned him under oath in Palmetto, Fla., in March 1970.
    "I do not recall any civilians being picked up and categorically stated that I did not order the killing of any civilians, nor do I know of any being killed," his statement said.

    An Army investigator called Reh at Ft. Myer. Reh's attorney called back. The investigator made notes of their conversation: "If the interview of Reh concerns atrocities in Vietnam … then he had already advised Reh not to make any statement."
    As for Lt. Col. Taylor, two soldiers described his actions that day.

    Myran Ambeau, a rifleman, said he was standing five feet from the captain and heard him contact the battalion commander, who was in a helicopter overhead. (Ambeau did not identify Reh or Taylor by name.)

    "The battalion commander told the captain, 'If they move, shoot them,' " according to a sworn statement that Ambeau gave an investigator in Little Rock, Ark. "The captain verified that he had heard the command, he then transmitted the instruction to Lt Carter.
    "Approximately three minutes later, there was automatic weapons fire from the direction where the prisoners were being held."
    Gary A. Bennett, one of Reh's radio operators, offered a somewhat different account. He said the captain asked what he should do with the detainees, and the battalion commander replied that it was a "search and destroy mission," according to an investigator's summary of an interview with Bennett.

    Bennett said he did not believe the order authorized killing civilians and that, although he heard shooting, he knew nothing about a massacre, the summary says. Bennett refused to provide a sworn statement.

    An Army investigator sat down with Taylor at the Army War College in Carlisle, Pa. Taylor said he had never issued an order to kill civilians and had heard nothing about a massacre on the date in question. But the investigator had asked Taylor about events occurring on Feb. 9, 1968 — a day after the incident.

    Three and a half years later, an agent tracked Taylor down at Ft. Myer and asked him about Feb. 8. Taylor said he had no memory of the day and did not have time to provide a sworn statement. He said he had a "pressing engagement" with "an unidentified general officer," the agent wrote.

    Investigators wrote they could not find Pvt. Frank Bonilla, the man known as "Crazy." The Times reached him at his home on Oahu in March.

    Bonilla, now 58 and a hotel worker, says he recalls an order to kill the civilians, but says he does not remember who issued it. "Somebody had a radio, handed it to someone, maybe a lieutenant, said the man don't want to see nobody standing," he said.
    Bonilla says he answered a call for volunteers but never pulled the trigger.

    "I couldn't do it. There were women and kids," he says. "A lot of guys thought that I had something to do with it because they saw me going up there…. Nope … I just turned the other way. It was like, 'This ain't happening.' "

    Afterward, he says, "I remember sitting down with my head between my knees. Is that for real? Someone said, 'Keep your mouth shut or you're not going home.' "

    He says he does not know who did the shooting.

    The Outcome

    The Criminal Investigation Division assigned Warrant Officer Jonathan P. Coulson in Los Angeles to complete the investigation and write a final report on the "Henry Allegation." He sent his findings to headquarters in Washington in January 1974.

    Evidence showed that the massacre did occur, the report said. The investigation also confirmed all but one of the other killings that Henry had described. The one exception was the elderly man thrown off a cliff. Coulson said it could not be determined whether the victim was alive when soldiers tossed him.

    The evidence supported murder charges in five incidents against nine "subjects," including Carter and Bonilla, Coulson wrote. Those two carried out the Feb. 8 massacre, along with "other unidentified members of their element," the report said.

    Investigators determined that there was not enough evidence to charge Reh with murder, because of conflicting accounts "as to the actual language" he used.

    But Reh could be charged with dereliction of duty for failing to investigate the killings, the report said.
    Coulson conferred with an Army legal advisor, Capt. Robert S. Briney, about whether the evidence supported charges against Taylor.

    They decided it did not. Even if Taylor gave an order to kill the Vietnamese if they moved, the two concluded, "it does not constitute an order to kill the prisoners in the manner in which they were executed."

    The War Crimes Working Group records give no indication that action was taken against any of the men named in the report.
    Briney, now an attorney in Phoenix, says he has forgotten details of the case but recalls a reluctance within the Army to pursue such charges.

    "They thought the war, if not over, was pretty much over. Why bring this stuff up again?" he says.

    Years Later

    Taylor retired in 1977 with the rank of colonel. In a recent interview outside his home in northern Virginia, he said, "I would not have given an order to kill civilians. It's not in my makeup. I've been in enough wars to know that it's not the right thing to do."
    Reh, who left active duty in 1978 and now lives in Northern California, declined to be interviewed by The Times.
    Carter, a retired postal worker living in Florida, says he has no memory of his combat experiences. "I guess I've wiped Vietnam and all that out of my mind. I don't remember shooting anyone or ordering anyone to shoot," he says.

    He says he does not dispute that a massacre took place. "I don't doubt it, but I don't remember…. Sometimes people just snap."
    Henry was re-interviewed by an Army investigator in 1972, and was never contacted again. He drifted away from the antiwar movement, moved north and became a logger in California's Sierra Nevada foothills. He says he had no idea he had been vindicated — until The Times contacted him in 2005.

    Last fall, he read the case file over a pot of coffee at his dining room table in a comfortably worn house, where he lives with his wife, Patty.

    "I was a wreck for a couple days," Henry, now 59, wrote later in an e-mail. "It was like a time warp that put me right back in the middle of that mess. Some things long forgotten came back to life. Some of them were good and some were not.

    "Now that whole stinking war is back. After you left, I just sat in my chair and shook for a couple hours. A slight emotional stress fracture?? Don't know, but it soon passed and I decided to just keep going with this business. If it was right then, then it still is."
    Times researcher Janet Lundblad contributed to this report.

    About this report

    Nick Turse is a freelance journalist living in New Jersey. Deborah Nelson is a staff writer in The Times' Washington bureau.
    This report is based in part on records of the Vietnam War Crimes Working Group filed at the National Archives in College Park, Md. The collection includes 241 case summaries that chronicle more than 300 substantiated atrocities by U.S. forces and 500 unconfirmed allegations.

    The archive includes reports of war crimes by the 101st Airborne Division's Tiger Force that the Army listed as unconfirmed. The Toledo Blade documented the atrocities in a 2003 newspaper series.

    Turse came across the collection in 2002 while researching his doctoral dissertation for the Center for the History and Ethics of Public Health at Columbia University.

    Turse and Nelson also reviewed Army inspector general records in the National Archives; FBI and Army Criminal Investigation Division records; documents shared by military veterans; and case files and related records in the Col. Henry Tufts Archive at the University of Michigan.

    A selection of documents used in preparing this report can be found at latimes.com/vietnam.

    Source: Los Angeles Times

    Vietnam Civilian Killings Went Unpunished
     
  18. hello_10

    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

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    Vietnam Persecutes Christian Minority
    March 31, 2011

    BANGKOK — Vietnam has increased repression of indigenous minority Christians in the country’s Central Highlands, closing small informal churches, compelling public renunciations of faith and arresting worshipers, Human Rights Watch said in a report on Thursday.

    The hill tribe minorities, known as Montagnards, are traditionally animist but have been converted to Christianity in large numbers over the past half-century. Culturally and ethnically distinct from the majority lowland Vietnamese, the believers worship clandestinely in informal settings known as house churches, which are illegal under Vietnamese law.

    “Montagnards face harsh persecution in Vietnam, particularly those who worship in independent house churches, because the authorities don’t tolerate religious activity outside their sight or control,” said Phil Robertson, deputy Asia director of the human rights monitoring group, which is based in New York. “The Vietnamese government has been steadily tightening the screws on independent Montagnard religious groups, claiming they are using religion to incite unrest.”

    The conflicts involve more than religion as Vietnam’s population and economy expand and lowland Vietnamese settlers encroach on the farmland of indigenous hill tribes, primarily with agricultural plantations.

    There is a political aspect as well, involving government concerns over links with evangelical groups in the United States among some of the Montagnards. Many Montagnards fought alongside American and South Vietnamese troops during the Vietnam War, and some continued to resist after the Communist victory in 1975. :usa:

    For the most part, Montagnard Christians today are nonpolitical, but the government is particularly concerned about a branch known as Dega Christianity, which is associated with a movement for land rights.

    The United States designated Vietnam as a “country of particular concern” for religious freedom in 2004 but removed it from the list two years later, saying it was satisfied with the government’s moves to loosen restrictions.

    Officially atheist, Communist Vietnam started allowing religious practice in the early 1990s. Mostly Buddhist by tradition, it also has a Roman Catholic population that is the largest in Southeast Asia outside the Philippines. Buddhist temples are packed during festivals, and churches sometimes overflow with worshipers on Sundays and at Easter and Christmas.
    But under Vietnamese law, religious groups must register with the government and operate under approved guidelines. When the government gave official sanction to some evangelical Protestant churches a decade ago, almost none of the 400 churches in the Central Highlands were included.

    Independent unregistered groups often come under harsh government pressure. They include unapproved or independent congregations of Mennonites, Cao Dai, Hoa Hao Buddhists, ethnic Khmer Theravada Buddhists and members of the Unified Buddhist Church of Vietnam, as well as the Montagnard Christians.

    The police and local officials disperse their religious gatherings, confiscate religious literature and summon religious leaders to police stations for interrogation. In some instances, police officers destroy the churches of unauthorized groups and detain or imprison their members on charges of violating national security.

    “The United States government should recognize this and should clearly designate Vietnam as a country of particular concern for violations of religious freedom,” Mr. Robertson said. “I think the facts demand it. The situation with the Montagnards is one of the most egregious violations of religious freedom in Vietnam.”

    The Central Highlands are mostly off limits to journalists and independent rights groups. The report said much of its information came from the official news media as well as from asylum seekers who had fled through the mountains to neighboring Cambodia and from overseas Montagnard advocacy groups.

    The Vietnamese news media are remarkably forthright about the pressure on the Montagnards, Mr. Robertson said.

    The Human Rights Watch report quoted one Vietnamese press report, in Bao Gia Lai, a state newspaper in Gia Lai Province, as saying: “After attempting to organize violent protests at various locations in the highlands and facing continued failure, some helpless leaders fled into the forest. But the sacred wood and untamed water could not protect them.”

    It quoted Voice of Vietnam radio as saying, “When a so-called religion becomes a tool in the hands of evil people, it should be considered evil and unlawful and should be eliminated.”

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/01/world/asia/01vietnam.html
     
  19. hello_10

    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

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    as discussed above, the current state of these Single Mother Kids of US/UK is as below: :toilet:


    and hence, the total outcome of Western Culture is as below :toilet:

     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2013
  20. A chauhan

    A chauhan "अहिंसा परमो धर्मः धर्म हिंसा तथैव च: l" Senior Member

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    If this is true than it's an alarm! we Indians don't want to become like Syrians have.
     
    hello_10 likes this.
  21. Defenceindia2010

    Defenceindia2010 Regular Member

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    We have to stop it by any means.
     

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