USA Must Press China on Democracy

Discussion in 'China' started by sorcerer, Nov 11, 2014.

  1. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    Why the US Must Press China on Democracy

    Over the past month, protesters in Hong Kong have succeeded, despite Beijing’s best efforts, in creating and sustaining an unprecedented movement for democratic reform. Yet Hong Kong is unlikely to be feature much in President Obama’s trip to China this week. The trip’s primary purpose, after all, is economic: this year, Beijing plays host to the APEC Summit, an important gathering of trading leaders from across the Asia-Pacific region. Moreover, the Obama administration has raised the Hong Kong issue privately several times over the past few months, and the President offered a mild public rebuke on his first day in Beijing.

    But the message was clear: Hong Kong, and democracy more generally, is peripheral rather than central to U.S.-China relations. By stopping there, the Obama administration risks missing what may turn out to be a landmark moment for Chinese politics. The gripping authoritarianism that seemed to define Xi’s China now promises to give rise to the country’s most important political movement in decades. Washington should go out on a limb, and press Beijing openly and consistently to allow universal suffrage and free elections in Hong Kong.

    To be sure, doing so entails significant costs, and threatens to reverse some of the progress made in U.S.–China relations in recent years. Specifically, U.S. officials have recently softened their once-regular condemnations of China’s anti-democratic stance, as economic and security challenges have assumed greater importance, and both sides have come to the conclusion that little can be gained from further discussion on democracy and human rights. At the same time, China has made clear that it will tolerate no criticism regarding Hong Kong, which it regards as a purely internal matter. Any perceived American attempt to interfere with Beijing’s handling of the Hong Kong protests is likely to provoke a furious reaction from the Chinese government. But this time, it is worth the risk. The United States must stand up for democracy in Hong Kong by making the issue a central one in U.S.-China relations.

    Hong Kong’s protests, which began in late September and have continued, despite Beijing’s best efforts, are of unprecedented significance both for the territory and the mainland itself. Instead of seeking to protect freedoms already enjoyed under their city-state’s special political status, as they had in the past, Hong Kongers have marched, chanted, and occupied to expand their political rights – specifically, to vote in free and open elections for Hong Kong’s Chief Executive. Hong Kong’s leaders are chosen indirectly, by a body composed primarily of economic elites, and whose appointment Beijing essentially controls. Surrendering such power to the masses, even in Hong Kong, is beyond the pale for the Chinese Communist Party. Yet Hong Kong’s demand for democracy has resonated in other parts of China: last week, Taiwanese leader Ma Ying-jeou linked the territory’s democratic movement with its own, expressing support for the protesters before adding that if Beijing itself were to embrace democratic reforms, Taiwan may well accept eventual reunification with the mainland.

    This resonance creates an unsustainable tension, for it suggests that Hong Kong will not be the last large-scale civil protest that Beijing will have to confront. Beijing was betting that appeals to preserve Hong Kong’s reputation for stability and free enterprise rather than free-wheeling politics would prevent large-scale demonstrations, or at least marginalize protest leaders. In this it badly erred and in the process betrayed the error of the basic calculation that economic growth will neutralize calls for political reform. The territory’s widespread civil disobedience showed mainland China and the world that prosperity is no substitute for democracy, and that civic culture cannot survive by GDP growth alone. Although it may take quite a while, sooner or later Hong Kong-style protests will come to the mainland. Indeed, Hong Kong says much about how Beijing will respond to future calls for democratic reform: there will be no more Tiananmens, but there will be no compromise on the fundamentals, either.

    Paradoxically, this tension also opens a window for Washington to engage the Chinese government on political reform. Even as Beijing is clearly in need of fresh thinking on the issue, Chinese President Xi Jinping, widely thought to be the most powerful leader since at least Deng Xiaoping, if not Mao himself, has appeared sincere in his pursuit of some important reforms, including upholding China’s constitution, which guarantees freedom of speech and assembly, among other basic rights. Given this combination of threat and opportunity, Beijing may well be receptive to a tactful attempt to re-engage on issues related to political reform.

    Giving support to Hong Kong’s protesters while attempting to constructively engage Beijing will require delicate diplomacy, but it’s worth the effort. Ignoring the Hong Kong protests, on the other hand, as the Obama administration appears ready to do, risks sacrificing long-term strategic goals for short-term tactical wins. Whatever the direct outcome of last month’s civil disobedience, one thing is clear: we have seen the future of democratic protest in China, not just in Hong Kong, but on the mainland as well. For the United States, Hong Kong’s protests should solidify its resolve to promote democratic movements around the world, :rofl::rofl: and President Obama must take that message to Beijing—not only this week, but for the remainder of his presidency.

    Scott Moore is a Council on Foreign Relations International Affairs Fellow and a Research Associate at the Harvard Belfer Center on Science and International Affairs, where he specializes in Chinese politics.

    Source:http://thediplomat.com/2014/11/why-the-us-must-press-china-on-democracy/

    @Ray and All others


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  3. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    China cannot become a democracy for quite some time to come.

    The Communist Party of China will not abdicate their unquestioned right over the resources and citizens of the country. Notwithstanding, the codswallop about it being a Peoples' Republic, it is not so since the power and pelf is totally the privilege of the select band of Chinese Communist who rule the country. Questioned Power is a more heady elixir that is more powerful than the Opium that has seized the minds of China during the Opium War. And pelf is something that Chinese are addicted to, if one sees the greed for money over ethics of even common Mainland Chinese and surely same is applicable to the Communist leaders. Mor so, since they are practically immune to law, which in any case is subject to the dictation of the CPC.

    The Mainland Chinese have no experience of living in the freedom of Democracy; not that democracy is perfect. Yet, democracy at least guarantees one from the evils of mind control, and ensures a free and fair justice system to right the wrongs of the citizen and the State.

    But then these are alien to the Chinese since they are groomed to obey by the "Theory of Legalism", where the State is accepted as the maibaap of the citizens. So, even the Mainland citizens of China will baulk at any change. The Chinese are very suspicious and averse to change, except when the maibaap i.e. the CPC orders such a change.

    That is why the Chinese posters out here defend the indefensible or obfuscate to confuse and go tangential into the irrelevant.The concept - the State can do no wrong.

    Hong Kong is a different kettle of fish. The citizens under the British did not have democracy in its unequivocal terms. But they had guaranteed individual rights and a free and fair justice system. Therefore, the had breathed the free air of democratic norms, even if they did not govern themselves. This is the freedom that the Mainland Chinese cannot understand.

    Hence, none can advise or assist the Chinese Communist Party to allow democracy to flourish in China.

    The CPC will not abdicate their supreme control of the mind and soul of the Mainland Chinese to lose the unbridled power, pelf and privileges they enjoy in a most undemocratic and authoritarian manner.

    This is a bogus claim cranked up by the US ideologues that is hopeless flawed.

    When Hong Kong was under the British, was there democracy, beyond the guarantee of individual rights and a free and fair justice system?

    No.

    It was merely engined by GDP then.

    If it could for so long a period in history sustain itself merely on its GDP and civic culture then, how come the same does not apply now?

    What is ignoring the Hong Kong protest?

    What exactly can the Obama administration do?

    The only way to ensure that democracy comes to China is by doing another Iraq with the same clarion cry - Freedom and Democracy.

    Can the US replicate Iraq?

    Why day dream and blame Obama (not that he is someone who enthuses anyone).
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2014
  4. nimo_cn

    nimo_cn Senior Member Senior Member

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    What is so good about today's Iraq?

    Ask those who are actually living there, I guarantee that they prefer a Iraq under the dictator saddam hussein.

    Sent from my HUAWEI P7-L07 using Tapatalk 2
     
  5. Srinivas_K

    Srinivas_K Senior Member Senior Member

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    Let those chinese citizens live under dictatorial, oppressive, fascist, brutal CCP regime. :lol:

    Chinese are like frogs in well thinking they are in a big ocean !!
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2014
  6. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    I totally agree with this.

    Democracy is good.

    But it cannot be foisted on the people who live under and accept a different system.

    If indeed democracy is to be inculcated in such country, it has to be done with compassion and care and only when they accept it, should it be done.
     
  7. nimo_cn

    nimo_cn Senior Member Senior Member

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    I disagree!

    Democracy is not necessarily good, or I should say that the democracy you are refering to is not necessarily good.

    Democracy is neither commentary nor derogatory, but a neuter noun. it's like one of many tools we have in our kit box, it's more important to find a suitable tool than to own a fancy one.

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  8. nimo_cn

    nimo_cn Senior Member Senior Member

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    I really hope that people could leave us alone, let us to take our own path.

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  9. Srinivas_K

    Srinivas_K Senior Member Senior Member

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    China is most isolated country in history, building walls around them.

    You people cannot take your own path, You people will follow CCP's path !!
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2014
  10. ladder

    ladder Senior Member Senior Member

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    Does China have oil? If no, USA will not press for democracy.
     
  11. rock127

    rock127 Maulana Rockullah Senior Member

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    China needs Democracy.

    Let's help enslaved Chinese help free themselves from Oppressive Communists.
     
  12. jus

    jus Senior Member Senior Member

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    oh common,how can u compare yourself with those Middle east muslim savages :rofl:
    But u can't stop democracy it ignited mini fire in HK and it will spread to mainland.But i really believe democracy will make China a great nation. :thumb:
     
  13. Srinivas_K

    Srinivas_K Senior Member Senior Member

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    Atleast their music is different, some of the songs are good :cool2:

    Plus they have Belly dance !! :basanti::basanti::basanti:
     
  14. jus

    jus Senior Member Senior Member

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    Stop ur belly dance,Chin/ese is great &intellectual continuous civilization.Thanks to CCP they are became ctrl C ctrl V.

    But plz don't compare muslims with any civilized or civilization :pound:
     
  15. Srinivas_K

    Srinivas_K Senior Member Senior Member

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    Those are Belly dancers, not me Bit%h !! :shocked:

    Chinese admit that ctrl+c, ctrl+v is one trait that descended from their culture. As if China is the only country that has one continuous civilization :sarcastic:

    India is Great !!

    Turks have good civilization, similarly Iranians have good civilization.
     
  16. nimo_cn

    nimo_cn Senior Member Senior Member

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    Given the obvious animosity Indians are having toward China, I would rather be disenchanted with the idea of Indians sincerely offering something we Chinese actually need.

    Please let us stay where we are, being enslaved and oppressed. Only by comparison with a totalitarian China could the superiority of Indian democracy be well demonstrated.

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  17. nimo_cn

    nimo_cn Senior Member Senior Member

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    Then allow us to take the CCP's path, not everyone has to take the Indian path.

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  18. Srinivas_K

    Srinivas_K Senior Member Senior Member

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    The reverse is true, It is China which is causing trouble in India by border incursions and claiming Arunachal Pradesh.
     
  19. Srinivas_K

    Srinivas_K Senior Member Senior Member

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    Oh Please continue walking in CCP's dictatorial and warmongering path. Either China will incur heavy losses or before that CCP will be dethroned. Any way CCP will loose power for sure!!
     
  20. jus

    jus Senior Member Senior Member

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    we ruled by barbaric invaders(moguls&brits) but they are not.

    don't start muslims again,they are destroyers.period
     
  21. Srinivas_K

    Srinivas_K Senior Member Senior Member

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    What does that has to do with Civilization??

    Indian retained its major part of civilization !!

    Chinese are also ruled by Mongols for 100 years, also conquered by Koreans and Japanese.
     
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