US Wasted Billions in Iraq with Few Results: Inspector

Discussion in 'Americas' started by asianobserve, Mar 8, 2013.

  1. asianobserve

    asianobserve Elite Member Elite Member

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    Agence France-Presse on Thursday, March 7th, 2013


    After invading Iraq ten years ago, the United States spent $60 billion on a vast reconstruction effort that left behind few successes and a litany of failures, an auditor’s report said Wednesday.

    The ambitious plan to transform the country after the fall of Saddam Hussein has been marked by half-finished projects and crushed expectations, according to the final report of the Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction, Stuart Bowen.

    The aid effort was plagued by in-fighting among US agencies and an improvised “adhocracy” approach, with no one clearly in charge of a massive investment that was supposed to put Iraq on a stable footing, said the report to Congress.

    “Management and funding gaps caused hundreds of projects to fall short of promised results, leaving a legacy of bitter dissatisfaction among many Iraqis,” it said.

    Some of the reconstruction money was stolen, with a number of US military officers and contractors now imprisoned for fraud, while other funds remain unaccounted for to this day, it said.

    Of $2.8 billion in Iraqi oil revenues handled by the US Defense Department, officials could not produce documents accounting for the use of about $1.7 billion, including $1.3 billion in fuel purchases, it said.

    The lengthy report highlighted some of the worst examples of mismanagement and graft and included interviews with senior Iraqi and US officials who mostly regretted the outcome of the reconstruction program.

    “The level of fraud, waste, and abuse in Iraq was appalling,” Senator Susan Collins, a Republican from Maine, was quoted as saying.

    She was “especially angry when she learned that some reconstruction money found its way into the hands of insurgent groups,” the report said.

    The review, however, concluded that a program to train and arm Iraqi security forces stood out as a success.

    Both Iraqi and US officials agreed that the Americans tended to ignore the advice of Iraqis or never bothered to consult them before launching costly projects, with sometimes disastrous results.

    The list of failures included a new police academy with raw sewage leaking through ceilings, a subcontractor charging $900 for a control switch valued at seven dollars and a project to build large prison in Diyala province that was eventually abandoned, despite an investment of $40 million.

    Hoping to restore a vital oil and gas pipeline at the al-Fatah bridge, which had been blown up during the US invasion, American officials tried to build a pipeline under the Tigris river at a cost $75 million.

    A geological study had predicted that drilling in the sandy soil under the river would doom the attempt and the warning proved correct. After the project failed, the pipeline and bridge were fixed, but at an additional cost of $29 million.

    Iraqi officials recounted a bewildering array of US bureaucrats and contractors who rushed through poorly planned projects while arguing among themselves.

    “Not only was there no coordination between the Department of State, the Pentagon and the CPA (coalition provisional authority), they were fighting each other,” Fuad Hussein, chief of staff to the Kurdish regional government’s president, Massoud Barzani, told the inspector general.

    “The policy was to control the Ministries of Oil, Interior, and Defense completely, but if you know nothing about the culture you’re trying to control, the result is chaos,” he said.

    The US commander credited with rescuing the war effort and containing sectarian violence, David Petraeus, offered the report’s authors a more optimistic view.

    The reconstruction program brought “colossal benefits to Iraq,” said Petraeus, while acknowledging mistakes made immediately after the invasion, including disbanding the Iraqi army.

    “Over time, we got the electricity infrastructure running and the oil industry working again, and, thanks to these efforts, the country began generating significant oil revenues,” Petraeus was quoted as saying. The four-star general went on to lead the CIA before resigning last year over an extra-marital affair.

    A senior diplomat, Deputy Secretary of State William Burns, told the auditors that in any future aid effort, the United States should move with more caution and not expect to “do it all and do it our way.”


    Read more: US wasted billions in Iraq with few results: inspector | Defense & Security News at DefenceTalk
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2013
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  3. W.G.Ewald

    W.G.Ewald Defence Professionals/ DFI member of 2 Defence Professionals

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    There should be no aid efforts at all related to military missions. The goal should be to destroy the enemy and then leave.
     
  4. satish007

    satish007 Senior Member Senior Member

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    US not only let a participator pay for 9/11, but control a big oil producing area and get the respect from all over the world.
    who can evaluate the value of last one using money?
     
  5. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    Who was the enemy in Iraq? What was the reason? Who benefited from the sham reconstruction? I heard one Dick Cheney was the president of some company that won all contracts.

    America has a lot to answer on the Iraq war. It was a sham and was not necessary. The worse part is that it botched the post war scene so badly that it has no favors from Iraqis now. If the war was bad, the post war effort by the US was worse. It reminds me of India. Contracts are for just making money while no work is done.
     
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  6. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    $900 for a $7 switch. I get you will get the same switch for under $1 from china. I wish I had got some contract in Iraq :D
     
  7. anoop_mig25

    anoop_mig25 Senior Member Senior Member

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    they should have invested in afgaistan instead of iraq , that would have solved problem , but iraq had oil , while afganistan has desert
     
  8. W.G.Ewald

    W.G.Ewald Defence Professionals/ DFI member of 2 Defence Professionals

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    For some reason, Iraq War has been separated from the Gulf War which preceded it.

    Timeline of the Gulf War - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Timeline of the Gulf War begins in August 2, 1990 and ended on February 28, 1991.
    1990


     
  9. W.G.Ewald

    W.G.Ewald Defence Professionals/ DFI member of 2 Defence Professionals

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    I was thinking about this comment about America having to answer for the Iraq War, or anything else for that matter. Answer to whom, exactly? Uncle Sam goes around the world stepping on his dick all the time, and everybody complains, but he doesn't really have to answer to anybody.:truestory:

    I am not really trying to be provocative, just making an observation.:pokerface:
     
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  10. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    Firstly the US has to answer its own people on why the nation got into a false war. Wasn't the public opinion divided? There was a Relublican bravado mainly Bush-Cheny.

    The US will have to answer the world on the situation that has made the Mid East even more dangerous.

    Mind you I am a staunch pro US person you will ever find in India.
     
  11. W.G.Ewald

    W.G.Ewald Defence Professionals/ DFI member of 2 Defence Professionals

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    Yes, there was outrage among some of the population over Bush-Cheney, Halliburton, etc for 8 years. I did not see that US policy changed because of it. The Mideast has been dangerous since at least 1948. Again, how will the US have to "answer" for that? If US policy changed because of world opinion, the US would not be trying to oust Assad today.
     
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  12. Armand2REP

    Armand2REP CHINI EXPERT Veteran Member

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    Billions? More like a Trillion! That entire war was a waste of money. Now you have a country aligned with Iran and Syria... wtf was GW thinking?!? Oh wait, he is a retard.

     
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  13. The Messiah

    The Messiah Bow Before Me! Elite Member

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    Bush was an idiot, he literally kicked iraq into the lap of iran.

    Iran benefitted from the iraq war and so did private yankee companies.
     
  14. W.G.Ewald

    W.G.Ewald Defence Professionals/ DFI member of 2 Defence Professionals

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    Private Yankee companies benefit from every war. Eisenhower made the point in 1961.

     
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  15. W.G.Ewald

    W.G.Ewald Defence Professionals/ DFI member of 2 Defence Professionals

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  16. W.G.Ewald

    W.G.Ewald Defence Professionals/ DFI member of 2 Defence Professionals

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    What Bush Got Right on Iraq — and What Obama Can Learn from It | TIME.com

     
  17. mattster

    mattster Respected Member Senior Member

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    The lesson I learned from the Iraq War:

    The Iraq war is living proof that even established democracies with long-standing strong, independent legal, judicial, political traditions, with advanced economies, and an educated populace in place - are amazingly not very different from 3rd world states; in the sense that, a single "bad dumb choice" in the top leadership of the country can literally be a disaster for the entire country and its impact felt for decades after the "bad choice" has left the scene.

    Simply put - "Nothing can insulate you or your country from just one dumb President or Prime Minister"

    The "Iraq War" in my humble opinion was probably the dumbest most idiotic war ever waged in the current and last century.
    The tab for this war is not billions......but well over a Trillion USD. Hundreds of Thousands of lives destroyed !!!
    The results - Iraq today is incredibly a bigger mess than when Saddam and his goons ran it.

    BE CAREFUL WHO YOU VOTE FOR !!!
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2013
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  18. W.G.Ewald

    W.G.Ewald Defence Professionals/ DFI member of 2 Defence Professionals

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    The myth persists among the perennial sophomores. Do yourself a favor and look and the congressional votes on the war so you can finally emerge from your ignorance,

    Iraq Resolution - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    The melodramatic posturing on DFI can be at times quite tedious.
     
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  19. mattster

    mattster Respected Member Senior Member

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    I was fully aware of the fact that a big majority in congress voted in favor of the war(both Democrats and Republicans) when i first responded to this thread.

    The fact remains that Bush and his senior team cherry-picked every once of intelligence to support this war.
    They came up with some of the craziest stories to get people on their side.

    Congress is nothing but a bunch of sheep when it comes to authorizing a war/military action.
    The President leads and Congress follows. Did you really expect congress to block a US President from going to war ?
    Who is the sophomore here - me or you ??

    But the ultimate responsibility lies with Bush and his national security team.
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2013
  20. linjooo

    linjooo New Member

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    American voted Bush to be the president,so they should take the responsibility. Now it is not to time to blame bush, but to rethink of what they done. For the last decades, US messed up everything, e.g creating enemy around the world, quantitative Easing, drone strike. They thought they freed people in Iraq, but they never ask what the normal Iraq residents say. I saw a new that Obama promise not to use drone attack for US citizen. Can Obama also make a promise not to use it for other countries ,at least for US allies. I really don't think so.
     
  21. W.G.Ewald

    W.G.Ewald Defence Professionals/ DFI member of 2 Defence Professionals

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    Even with hindsight the Iraq war was the best option for all concerned

    Alexander Downer was foreign minister from 1996 to 2007.

    Alexander Downer - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
     

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