US to send marines to Australia

Discussion in 'Americas' started by Yusuf, Nov 16, 2011.

  1. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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  3. SHASH2K2

    SHASH2K2 New Member

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    These will be some special ops team or for some training purpose . 2500 seems to be very small number that can have any impact in such a huge area.
     
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  4. SHASH2K2

    SHASH2K2 New Member

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    [h=1]Eyeing China, U.S. Expands Military Ties to Australia
    [/h]
    CANBERRA, Australia — President Obama and Prime Minister Julia Gillard of Australia announced plans on Wednesday for a sustained new American military presence in Australia, a deployment of 2,500 troops aimed at signaling that the United States intends to counterbalance a rising China. The agreement with Australia, though involving a relatively small number of troops, is nonetheless the first long-term expansion of the American military presence in the Pacific since the end of the Vietnam War. It comes despite budget cuts facing the Pentagon and a strong negative reaction from Chinese leaders, who have accused the United States of seeking to raise military tensions in the region.
    “With my visit to the region I am making it clear that the United States is stepping up its commitment to the entire Asia-Pacific region,” Mr. Obama said at a joint news conference with Ms. Gillard soon after his arrival here in Australia’s capital.
    Mr. Obama said the basing agreement “allows us to meet the demands of a lot of partners in the region that want to feel that they’re getting the training, they’re getting the exercises, and that we have the presence that’s necessary to maintain the security architecture in the region.”
    “But the second message I’m trying to send is that we are here to stay,” Mr. Obama said. “This is a region of huge strategic importance to us.” He added: “Even as we make a whole host of important fiscal decisions back home, this is right up there at the top of my priority list. And we’re going to make sure that we are able to fulfill our leadership role in the Asia-Pacific region.”
    On his two-day visit to Australia, the president will fly north across the continent to Darwin, a frontier port and military outpost across the Timor Sea from Indonesia, which will be the center of operations for the coming deployment. The first 200 to 250 Marines will arrive next year, with forces rotating in and out and eventually building up to 2,500, the two leaders said.
    The United States will not build new bases on the continent, but will use Australian facilities instead. Mr. Obama said that Marines will rotate through for joint training and exercises with Australians, and the American Air Force will have increased access to airfields in the nation’s Northern Territory.
    “We’re going to be in a position to more effectively strengthen the security of both of our nations and this region,” he said.
    The United States has had military bases and large forces in Japan and South Korea, in the north Pacific, since the end of World War II, but its presence in Southeast Asia was greatly diminished in the early 1990’s with the closure of major bases in the Philippines, at Clark Field and Subic Bay. The new arrangement with Australia will restore a substantial American footprint near the South China Sea, a major commercial route — including for American exports — that has been roiled by China’s disputed claims of control.
    Like Australia, China’s neighbors in Southeast Asia have looked to the United States to increase its military presence as a counterweight to Beijing. Mr. Obama has sought to provide that assurance, but the Asia-Pacific allies are well aware of the intense pressure for budget-cutting in Washington, and fear that squeezed military spending and other factors may inhibit Mr. Obama’s ability to follow through.
    The United States and other Pacific Rim nations are also negotiating to create a free-trade bloc that does not include China, the Trans-Pacific Partnership. The tentative trade agreement was a topic over the weekend in Honolulu, where Mr. Obama hosted the annual Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation forum, and it will be discussed again later this week when he becomes the first American president to participate in the East Asia Summit, on the Indonesian island of Bali.
    For China, the week’s developments could suggest both an economic and a military encirclement.
    Liu Weimin, a foreign ministry spokesman, issued a measured statement on Wednesday in response to Mr. Obama’s announcement that suggested the United States should focus on promoting development rather than building military alliances.
    “It may not be quite appropriate to intensify and expand military alliances and may not be in the interest of countries within this region,” he told a news briefing.
    The Global Times, a state-run news organization known for its nationalist and bellicose commentaries, issued a stronger reaction in an editorial, saying Australia should be cautious about allowing the United States to use bases there to “harm China” and that it risked getting “caught in the crossfire.”

    Analysts say that Chinese leaders have been caught off guard by what they view as an American campaign to stir up discontent in the region. China may have miscalculated in recent years by restating longstanding territorial claims that would give it broad sway over development rights in the South China Sea, they say. But they argue that Beijing has not sought to project military power far beyond its shores, and has repeatedly proposed to resolve territorial disputes through negotiations.
    The United States portrays its newly aggressive stance in Asia as a response, urged on by regional powers, to China’s own aggressions. Hillary Rodham Clinton wrote a recent article in Foreign Policy laying out an expansive case for American involvement in Asia, and Defense Secretary Leon Panetta characterized China’s military development as lacking transparency and criticized its assertiveness in the regional waters.
    The new American focus on Asia, analysts said, threatened to sour relations with Chinese leaders.
    “I don’t think they’re going to be very happy,” said Mark Valencia, a Hawaii-based senior researcher at the National Bureau of Asian Affairs, who said the new policy was months in the making. “I’m not optimistic in the long run as to how this is going to wind up.”
    Mr. Obama took steps on Wednesday to signal that the new deployment, and the recent push to set up a new trading bloc, are not meant to isolate China.
    “The notion that we fear China is mistaken; the notion that we are looking to exclude China is mistaken,” he said.
    The president said that China would be welcomed into the tentative trade pact, the Trans-Pacific Partnership — nine nations, including the United States, agreed in Honolulu to finalize a framework in 2012 — if Beijing is willing to meet the free-trade standards for membership. But such standards would require China to let its currency rise in value, to better protect foreign producers’ intellectual property rights and to limit or end subsidies to state-owned companies, all of which would require a major overhaul of China’s economic development strategy.
    Mr. Obama canceled two previous planned trips to Australia because of domestic demands; he recalled at a state dinner on Wednesday that he had visited the country twice as a boy, when his mother was working in Indonesia on development programs.
    This time, as president, Mr. Obama arrived at Parliament House to a 21-gun salute and, once inside, to the enthusiastic greeting of Australians crowding the galleries of the vast marble entrance hall.
    The two countries have been allies for decades, and cooperated closely in World War II, when there were several dozen American air and naval bases and army camps in the country and Australian combat troops served under American command. Another purpose of Mr. Obama’s visit is to celebrate those ties. “The United States has no stronger ally,” Mr. Obama said.
    Australians fought alongside the United States in every war of the 20th century, and more recently have served in Iraq and Afghanistan. The war in Afghanistan has become increasingly unpopular here, though, and most Australians want their troops to come home immediately.
     
  5. niharjhatn

    niharjhatn Regular Member

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    Closer US Aussie military ties irk China (as usual)

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/17/world/asia/obama-and-gillard-expand-us-australia-military-ties.html?_r=1&hp


    Wel, in something that is largely a symbolic gesture, understandable that Beijing is concerned. Note it is not JOINT EXERCISES - rather, admittance to let the US troops train in the largely exotic landscape of the Northern Territory, with Kangaroos, Crocodiles, and yes, where dingos CAN steal your baby :D

    Seems like everyone's getting a bit edgy about China! Perhaps this will develop into a US forward deployment zone in the future!

    Good or bad for India that US are taking (MUCH!) more interest in the region?

    IMO it both has positives and negatives - it really depends how proactive the US is to protecting its interests, and whether it is solely military (will it impact defense deals with Vietnam etc?)

    US are definitely upping the naval presence, promising more US warships docking in ports in Australia.

    Funny this is coming AT THE SAME TIME that PM Julia Gillard is lifting the ban on Uranium sales in India - perhaps more than meets the eye, eh?
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2011
  6. kickok1975

    kickok1975 Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    Looks like US is heading to a Soviet way of eventual bankruptcy by running out of money on military while China is heading to a US way of becoming the most hated country on earth.
     
  7. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    US Does Not Fear China - Obama

    Apparently the US is giving a clear message that the US may appear to be down, but it is not out.

    In fact, the events around the world is that the US and its allies are trying to regain their pre-eminent position. given the activities in North Africa and the Middle East.

    That the US means business, is also indicative in the US stating that they will leave Iraq lock, stock and barrel, but stating with hushed tones, that they will hunker down in a base in friendly Kuwait!!

    In Afghanistan, the US is hedging and cosmetically going around their intention to leave.

    And, while the other areas may not have had serious impact on China, the military movement to Australia surely is a serious matter of concern for the Chinese Govt and also its strategic planners.

    The Australians lifting the embargo on the export of uranium to India is another indication in the direction that the US is wanting to shore up countries which are not very pleased with China.

    But then, the US elections are also looming close!
     
  8. Galaxy

    Galaxy Elite Member Elite Member

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    Even Vietnam does not fear China. :pound:

    Why U.S. will ever fear of China ?? They become Super power not by luck but lots of hard-work and planning.
     
  9. agentperry

    agentperry Senior Member Senior Member

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    pity that situation is like this where usa, serving superpower is needed to clarify that he is not afraid of other country. this is a clear sign that usa now is threatened just like it was in cold war by ussr.
     
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  10. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Indeed it is unfortunate.

    But then there must be serious concern that the US is fading.

    Therefore, it is essential to bolster the confidence.

    And elections are coming and maybe the US citizenry has doubts that Obama is doing anything to sustain and improve US machismo!

    Could it be a reassurance to his domestic audience that he is not afraid of China?
     
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  11. thakur_ritesh

    thakur_ritesh Administrator Administrator

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    Sir,

    Iraq hasnt ended as a lock, stock and barrel, from the news that appeared later on as a follow up to the first news where it was said all wind up is happening, it mentioned that there will remain some sort of military presence in Iraq post the "withdrawal", and the first news that appeared was a misrepresentation of facts.

    @topic

    It serves our interest if the US sustains a good military presence in Australia.

    Important will be, can the US bargain a base in Indonesia, a country like India that they are aggressively courting, if they can do that, that would be the biggest strategic coup in SEA. China would be very worried.
     
  12. Tianshan

    Tianshan Regular Member

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    why should a superpower fear us?

    we are still so far behind.
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2011
  13. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Chinese are very shrewd.

    They let their actions speak!
     
  14. satish007

    satish007 Senior Member Senior Member

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    well uncle sam owe chinese zillion dollars,that let they fearless
     
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  15. W.G.Ewald

    W.G.Ewald Defence Professionals/ DFI member of 2 Defence Professionals

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    US Marines are tough, but more than 2500 may be needed to contain China.
     
  16. kickok1975

    kickok1975 Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    1. US should fear Obama and his reckless spending democratic comrades which will bankrupt US
    2. US should fear her southern border while million of illegal Mexican come in every year which will transfer USA into a Latin America country in next few decades
    3. US should fear American’s lazy and complacent mentality which is sharply contrast to their forefathers

    Meantime, Chinese should fear their deeply corrupted CCP government.
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2011
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  17. Neil

    Neil Senior Member Senior Member

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    US naval move in Australia may help India take on China

    The US move to create a naval base in northern Australia close to the South China Sea can actually mean more dollars in the Indian kitty, and put more strategic and business opportunities in New Delhi’s way, sources said. The first piece of evidence has come by way of Australia’s decision to selluranium to India.

    The US move will provide a sense of protection to East Asian countries including Japan, who have serious conflicts with China but buy vast amounts of Chinese goods. The new found protection will encourage East Asia to reduce its dependence on China for goods and enhance economic ties with India, sources said.

    “Japan, Vietnam and Indonesia will feel more secure. India and Indonesia can get together to control the Malacca Straits, which is the route though which 90% of Chinese goods to East Asia passes,” Subramanian Swamy, Janata Party president and a widely regarded China expert, told TNN.

    There are signs that China is jittery about the US move to station 2,500 US marines in the Northern Territory of Australia within five years. Beijing on Thursday warned Australia it might get “caught in the crossfire” if it allows the US to exercise its naval might in the waters around it. Washington’s move has put the US navy within easy sailing reach of Vietnam, which is involved in a serious territorial dispute over oil-rich islands in the South China Sea.

    The move will also bring some relief to the ONGC, which is one of the foreign companies involved in exploring oil along with Vietnamese oil firms in the South China Sea. China has bitterly criticized India on the move and asked ONGC to withdraw.

    When it comes to exporting to East Asia, India cannot replace China, which has a wide range of goods to offer, Uday Bhaskar, director of the National Maritime Foundation, said.

    “But there is a strategic review of the bilateral relation with India by the US, EU and Japan, wherein Indian markets are being recognized as an important driver of trade in the region,” Bhaskar added.

    India will need to retool its export basket if it seriously wishes to compete with China as a provider of goods in East Asia, he said.

    The US move can also mean massive savings in investments being made by the Indian defence agencies on the India-China border, Abhijit Iyer-Mitra, research officer at the Institute of Conflict Studies in New Delhi, said.

    “This is God sent. The more US ramps up its military presence in South China Sea, the more it will divert Beijing’s attention from India,” he said.

    “It can actually mean a big saving on investments being made on the China border. But I doubt if our defence establishment would make the best of the opportunity. They are too attached to big budget,” he said.




    US naval move in Australia may help India take on China | idrw.org
     
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  18. trackwhack

    trackwhack Tihar Jail Banned

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    Seriously, what can 2500 troops stationed on an Australian base do? Dont read too much into this. We have to be prepared to fight our own battles.

    If China targets ONGC ships and drilling equipment, the Straits of Malacca should be closed for business. If we pussyfoot this, we are in big trouble.
     
  19. SHASH2K2

    SHASH2K2 New Member

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  20. Sikh_warrior

    Sikh_warrior Defence Professionals Defence Professionals

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    Good job Mr. Obama.
     
  21. Bhadra

    Bhadra Defence Professionals Defence Professionals Senior Member

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    2500 troops in Austrailia (and not an Austraialian base) can prepare ground and logistics for application of 250000 American troops. How much time would it take for friendly forces to converge? What is required is troops and logistics to support 250000 troops.
    OK....
     

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