US Calls For Improvement in India-Pakistan Ties, Says A Conflict Could Spark Nuclear War

Discussion in 'Foreign Relations' started by Zebra, Jun 1, 2016.

  1. Zebra

    Zebra Senior Member Senior Member

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    http://www.indiandefensenews.in/2016/06/us-calls-for-improvement-in-india.html

    US Calls For Improvement in India-Pakistan Ties, Says A Conflict Could Spark Nuclear War

    Wednesday, June 01, 2016 by Indiandefense News

    WASHINGTON:
    Expressing concern that a "conventional" conflict between India and Pakistan could escalate to include nuclear use, the us has called for a "sustained" and "resilient" dialogue process between the countries to boost regional peace.

    "We are concerned by nuclear and missile developments in South Asia ," a State Department spokesperson told PTI when asked about the recent statement of Dr Abdul Qadeer Khan, 80, the father of Pakistan's nuclear program, that Islamabad has the ability to target New Delhi in five minutes.

    "We are concerned by the increased security challenges that accompany growing stockpiles and the increased risk that a conventional conflict between India and Pakistan could escalate to include nuclear use.

    "It is important that there be a sustained and resilient dialogue process between the two neighbours, and that all parties in the region continuously act with maximum restraint and work collaboratively toward reducing tensions," the spokesperson said.

    Improvements in Indo-Pak bilateral relations would greatly enhance prospects for lasting peace, stability and prosperity in the region, the official said yesterday.

    Meanwhile, the State Department said it is looking forward to Prime Minister Narendra Modi's visit to the US.

    "We look forward to the prime minister's visit and we want it to be successful," State Department John Kirby told reporters at his daily news conference.

    Modi will embark on a five-nation visit from June 4 which will cover Afghanistan, Qatar, Switzerland, the US and Mexico.

    He will travel to the US on June 7 at the invitation of US President Barack Obama , with whom he will review the progress made in key areas of defence, security and energy, and will also address a Joint Meeting of the US Congress.
     
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  3. Zebra

    Zebra Senior Member Senior Member

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    Concentrate on visit and its purpose first, rather than "hire and fire" type issues.

    It might help.

    My two cents though.
     
  4. Zebra

    Zebra Senior Member Senior Member

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    India-Pakistan conflict is not anyway. :wink:
     
  5. Zebra

    Zebra Senior Member Senior Member

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    :doh:

    India-Pakistan conflict is not new anyway. :wink:
     
  6. Zebra

    Zebra Senior Member Senior Member

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    http://www.dawn.com/news/1261792/tr...bahar-port-with-afghanistan-a-security-threat

    ‘Trade route linking Chabahar Port with Afghanistan a security threat’


    The Newspaper's Staff Reporter — Updated a day ago

    ISLAMABAD
    : Two former defence secretaries insist the trade route which is being established by Iran, India and Afghanistan, linking Chabahar Port with Afghanistan, is a security threat.

    The comments made by the former defence secretaries just a week after the agreement for the trade route was signed by Iranian, Afghan and Indian leaders, is a reflection of the opinion held in military circles, which have been deeply suspicious of the port and the trade route.

    Speaking on the first day of a three-day workshop on Monday which was hosted by a local think tank, Strategic Vision Institute (SVI) on ‘National Security, Deterrence and Regional Stability in South Asia’, former defence secretary retired Lt-Gen Asif Yasin Malik said: “The alliance between India, Afghanistan and Iran is a security threat to Pakistan” and added that he feared that Pakistan is going into isolation.

    “In view of the regional and global environment, I see Pakistan falling into an abyss of isolation primarily because of its own mistakes and partly due to the hostile policies of other states,” he said.

    He blamed the situation on the “dysfunctional Foreign Office” and the absence of a full time foreign minister.

    Iran has tried to dispel concerns about its cooperation with India and Afghanistan with its envoy in Islamabad, Mehdi Honardoost last week saying that Pakistan and China should join in on the Chabahar agreement. He had then stressed that the Gwadar and Chabahar ports should not be seen as rivals.

    Pakistan’s Foreign Office also views the Chabahar port positively with Adviser on Foreign Affairs Sartaj Aziz saying at a press conference on Thursday that Pakistan did not see Iran’s Chabahar port as a rival and that Pakistan was in fact exploring the possibility of developing links with Gwadar.

    Nevertheless, the concerns among the military persist as mirrored by the former defence secretaries.

    At the event on Monday, retired Lt-Gen Nadeem Lodhi said the existence of such a “formidable bloc” in the neighbourhood had “ominous and far reaching implications” for Pakistan.

    He feared the three-nation bloc will affect Pakistan’s plans for regional economic integration, restoration of internal peace and maintenance of peaceful borders. It will also affect CPEC timelines, he added.

    “We need to break out of this encircling move with help from friends... diplomatic manoeuvres and by forging a strong deterrence,” he said, adding that of the three countries, Iran is most likely to pay heed to Pakistani concerns.

    He suggested Pakistan use China’s influence for fixing problems. “Iran must not be further alienated and its interests in CPEC should be developed,” Mr Lodhi said.

    He said that the defence and strategic relationship with China should be formalised instead of an unwritten understanding.

    Other speakers also deliberated on national security and asked the government to broaden its conception of challenges and risks and to respond to them proactively.

    Air University Registrar Ghulam Mujadid said that the eminence of security in national priorities is reflected in the four military take-overs in the country and the “ascendancy of military in political, internal and foreign policy decision making”.

    “Pakistan needs to correct this strategic myopia. A survivalist mindset about national security dominates the political discourse and continues to be the central pillar in Pakistan’s strategic calculations,” he said.

    Such a security focused state, he observed, allocates more resources for defence at the cost of social welfare and human security.

    He pointed out that the country lacked forums for national security formulation. Recognising that the establishment of a Cabinet Committee on National Security and the appointment of a national security adviser were steps in the right direction.

    Mr Mujadid noted that “decisions on security issues remain ad-hoc and disconnected; formulated and implemented in separate silos, hence policies are reactive instead of being consistent and coherent”.

    Published in Dawn, May 31st, 2016
     
  7. shankyz

    shankyz Regular Member

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    Haha ...CPEC deadlines affected by Chabahar deal. What a group of dimwits.

    Sent from my Samsung Galaxy J7
     
  8. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    US Calls For Improvement in India-Pakistan Ties, Says A Conflict Could Spark Nuclear War

    It should be
    US Calls For Improvement in India-Pakistan Ties, Says A Conflict Could Decimate pakistan for ever.



    Mushraff understood the capacity of pak pukes in 5 minutes during Kargil conflict as assured by the same AQ Khan, 80, the trader of pakistans' nuclear program
     

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