Unmanned Underwater Vehicle (UUV)

Discussion in 'Naval Warfare' started by A.V., May 30, 2011.

  1. A.V.

    A.V. New Member

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    The Columbia Group is hoping their new beefy underwater sub, the Proteus, a 25 foot 6,220lb beast, will turn some heads.

    The unmanned Proteus is capable of carrying 3,200 pounds of mines and ordnance.

    The Proteus is designed to carry an internal load of 400 lbs, which means a lot of sensors and cameras can be installed to find out what’s lurking in the deep.

    The Proteus (UUV), although it’s a tight fit, if necessary could carry a crew of up to 7 Navy SEALs to a highly fortified target.

    Proteus: Unmanned Underwater Vehicle (UUV) : RichardCYoung.com
     
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  3. A.V.

    A.V. New Member

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  4. Tronic

    Tronic Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    It would be good to see India invest in these.
     
  5. bhramos

    bhramos Elite Member Elite Member

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    already India has its own programs and at last phase of completion........ but may be if we can buy some of the Tech,,
     
  6. JAISWAL

    JAISWAL Senior Member Senior Member

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    ^^^^^
    India had started this project in way back in 2008
    .
    Http://www.rovworld.com/modules.php?name=News&file=article&sid=1964
    .
    .
    India's DRDO starts developing
    a UUV

    Posted on Tuesday, February 05,
    2008 @ 16:00:00 GMT byRons_
    ROV_Links
    The Indian Defence
    Research and
    Development
    Organisation (DRDO) is
    developing an unmanned
    underwater vehicle, which could
    defuse mines in the sea and
    attack enemy submarines, said
    DRDO chief A Sivathanu Pillai.
    Speaking to reporters on the
    sidelines of a science exhibition,
    he said the DRDO had already
    provided an Unmanned Aerial
    Vehicle (UAV) to the Indian Air
    Force. It had now decided to
    develop an unmanned
    underwater vehicle, which would
    be of immense use to the Indian
    Navy during wars.
    "The prototype for the
    underwater vehicle is being
    developed and we will be able to
    come out with a final product in
    five years", he said.

    The Exhibition was organised by
    the Tamil Nadu Science and
    Technology centre in
    collaboration with the Madras
    Science Association.
    On Brahmos, developed by
    DRDO, he said work on the
    second phase of Brahmos will
    begin soon. "We will design the
    supersonic cruise missile to cross
    the speed of five to seven times
    the speed of sound even before
    other countries can think of it".
    He said the Centre was allocating
    Rs 5,000 crore every year for
    DRDO and would be increased
    by 10 per cent, reaching Rs 7,500
    crore at the end of five year
    plan.
    © 2008 - The Hindu
     
  7. JAISWAL

    JAISWAL Senior Member Senior Member

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    AUV-150
    .
    .
    AUV (Autonomous Underwater
    Vehicle) -150 is an unmanned
    underwater vehicle (UUV) being
    developed by Central
    Mechanical Research Institute
    (CMERI) scientists inDurgapur in
    the Indian state of West Bengal.
    The project is sponsored by the
    Ministry of Earth Sciences and
    has technical assistance from IIT-
    Kharagpur.
    The vehicle was built with the
    intent of coastal security like
    mine counter-measures, coastal
    monitoring and reconnaissance.

    AUV 150 can be used to study
    aquatic life, for mapping of sea-
    floor andminerals along with
    monitoring of environmental
    parameters, such as current,
    temperature, depth and salinity.
    It can also be useful in cable and
    pipeline surveys. It is built to
    operate 150 metres under the
    sea and have cruising speed of
    up to four knots.
     
  8. JAISWAL

    JAISWAL Senior Member Senior Member

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    under water sea trial of AUv was held on 7-jan-2011
    .
    Http://www.goiit.com/posts/list/new...nderwater-vehicle-to-be-conducted-1065787.htm

    .
    .
    Sea trials of Autonomous
    Underwater Vehicle to be
    conducted this month-end
    Date 7 Jan 2011 13:32:17 IST ,
    thehindu Tags: Engineering
    Entrance
    « Back to News
    The sea trials of the Autonomous
    UnderwaterVehicle (AUV)
    designed and developed by the
    Central Mechanical Engineering
    Research Institute (CMERI),
    Durgapur — a constituent
    establishment of the Council of
    Scientific and Industrial Research
    (CSIR) — are slated to begin off
    the Chennai coast during the last
    week of January.The ‘AUV-150,'
    as the prototype is named, is
    built to operate 150 metres
    under the sea. It was developed
    in technical collaboration with
    the Indian Institute of
    Technology (IIT), Kharagpur.
    Theperformance parameters of
    the lab-scale model, developed
    by IIT, acted as a precursor to
    the prototype developed by
    CSIR-CMERI. The project is
    sponsored by the Ministry of
    Earth Sciences.
    The cylindricalAUV is capable of
    independently carrying out a
    plethora of underwater
    operations, including ocean
    floor-mapping, surveillance
    activities and oceanographic
    studies, based on data gathered
    using its onboard sensors.
    TheAUV underwent a series of
    sheltered water trials at the
    Defence Research and
    Development Organisation's
    (DRDO) Underwater Acoustic
    Research Facility (UARF) at
    Kerala's Idukki Reservoir over
    the last two years. The final leg
    of the still-water trials was
    conducted in the reservoir
    between September and
    October 2010. CMERI Director
    Gautam Biswas said: “The
    National Institute of Ocean
    Technology [NIOT] earlier
    developed a Remotely Operated
    Vehicle [ROV] with the capability
    to dive much deeper. Our
    vehicle, however, is different in
    that it is not remotely operated
    from a control station ashore. It
    has an onboard computer that
    can be pre-programmed to carry
    out specific tasks, which makes it
    a smart vehicle endowed with
    the ability to devise its own
    stratagems to execute a mission.
    The payload and the
    configuration are determined by
    the nature of the mission it is
    tasked with.”
    During the sea trials, the AUV's
    image processing capability
    would be assessed.
    “Besides, its capacity to model
    environmental parameters such
    as temperature gradient, current,
    depthand salinity gradient
    would be scrutinised. Once the
    technology is proven through
    extensive sea trials, the AUV can
    be customised for applications
    like close-to-coast undersea
    monitoring, mine
    countermeasures, cable and
    pipeline surveys, besides a host
    of oceanographic studies,”
    Professor Biswas said.
    Features
    TheAUV has hybrid
    communication channels. It uses
    radio frequency while on
    surface, but switches to acoustic
    communication when
    submerged. “The AUV has its
    own power, propulsion,
    navigation and control systems.
    For movement underwater, it
    locates own geographical
    position using navigational
    sensors, while its forward-looking
    sonarfacilitates obstacle evasion
    and safe passage. For effective
    operation, it is equipped with
    navigational sensors like the
    inertial navigation system, depth
    sonar, altimeter etc., and
    payload sensors like camera, side
    scan sonar and the like. It has
    extra roll stability, a cruising
    speed of up to four knots, and
    weighs about 490 kg,” Professor
    Biswas said.
    ‘Major project'
    The CSIR-CMERI held numerous
    meetings with experts from IIT-
    Kharagpur and NIOT during the
    development of the vehicle. “We
    also made a presentation at the
    Naval Science and Technological
    Laboratory [NSTL] at
    Visakhapatnam, which is
    developing its own AUV. The
    AUV-150 is one of the major
    projects executed by the CSIR
    family, and based on a few such
    projects, a joint R&D Council of
    CSIR-DRDO has been formed.
    The Indian Navy has also shown
    immense interest in our project,”
    Professor Biswas said.
    The‘AUV-150' was developed by
    a team of scientists of the
    Robotics and Automation division
    of CSIR-CMERI under the
    leadership of S.N. Shome.
     
  9. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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    ^^

    Why do your posts almost always look like an obelisk?

    [​IMG]
     
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  10. JAISWAL

    JAISWAL Senior Member Senior Member

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    ^^^
    Sir I post from my mobile and thats why I think it distort the word arrangement.
     
  11. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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    ^^ Oh ok I see.

    Yeah some mobiles do distort text formatting.
     
  12. JAISWAL

    JAISWAL Senior Member Senior Member

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  13. W.G.Ewald

    W.G.Ewald Defence Professionals/ DFI member of 2 Defence Professionals

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    U.S. Expands Use Of Underwater Unmanned Vehicles
     
  14. H.A.

    H.A. Senior Member Senior Member

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    [video=vimeo;62880818]http://vimeo.com/62880818#[/video]

    This five-and-a-half-foot robot jellyfish could be the future of Navy underwater surveillance. Seriously. Maybe. Certainly, if a team of engineers from Virginia Tech gets its way.

    Meet the Cyro, an autonomous robot with eight mechanical legs ringing its metal chassis, designed to mimic the unique, efficient underwater propulsion of a jellyfish. Covered in silicone to replicate the jellyfish’s wavy, bioluminescent mesoglea — the jelly, basically — the Cyro weighs a staggering 170 pounds, all thanks to a five-year grant from the Office of Naval Research.

    The robot is still a prototype, years away from being in the water. But it represents a new kind of testbed for oceanographic surveillance, the Cyro’s basic application. Like the bird- and insect-shaped drones the Air Force is developing, a jellyfish-like spybot has a natural stealth advantage. “Mimicking a natural animal found in a region allows you to explore a lot better,” says Alex Villanueva, a graduate student at Virginia Tech working on the Cyro.

    It’s a much different model for underwater propulsion than the Navy’s used to. Jellyfishes move, uniquely, by flapping themselves about. “It’s not necessarily the best hydrodynamics propulsion mechanism, but the jellyfish has a very efficient metabolism: energy going in comes out as hydrodynamic energy,” Villaneuva says. The Cyro isn’t there yet, but it gets three to four hours of swimming time out of its rechargeable nickel metal hydride battery.

    And it’s also a launch-and-forget robot. There’s no remote controls on the Cyro. Place it into the water, and its roll-pitch-yaw sensor package, pressure sensors and software do the rest. That’s something for the Navy to think about as it considers designs for its forthcoming unmanned underwater vehicle fleet.

    There’s no saying whether the Navy will purchase the ‘bot, and its inventors are comfortable emphasizing its civilian potential as an oceanographic research testbed. But should the Navy decide it needs a surveillance tool that looks like a massive jellyfish, there’s one on offer.
     
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  15. H.A.

    H.A. Senior Member Senior Member

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    'Green' Energy Powers Undersea Glider

    Thermal glider uses heat from the ocean to fly through the deep blue

    Researchers have successfully flown the first thermal glider through the ocean—a robotic vehicle that can propel itself for several months across thousands of miles, using only heat energy from the ocean.

    In April 2008, a research team led by Dave Fratantoni of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and Roy Watlington of the University of the Virgin Islands retrieved a prototype thermal glider that they had launched in December 2007 off the coast of St. Thomas in the Caribbean Sea. The vehicle crisscrossed a deep ocean basin between St. Thomas and St Croix more than 75 times, traveling uninterruptedly for more than 1,600 nautical miles (3,000 kilometers).

    [​IMG]

    ^^^ David Sutherland was a MIT/WHOI Joint Program student in the Physical Oceanography Department when he joined an ascending glider during a test in the Bahamas in January 2003. Sutherland earned his Ph.D. in the fall of 2007 and is now a postdoctoral fellow at WHOI. (Photo by Dave Fratantoni, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

    "We now believe the technology is stable enough to be used for science. It is no longer just an engineering prototype," Fratantoni said.

    The thermal glider fulfills a major step toward a long-held dream of oceanographers: launching an armada self-propelled, long-lasting, relatively inexpensive robots to roam throughout the oceans. The vehicles could measure ocean conditions over timepsans and territory impossible to attain and afford using ships, and they would report regularly via satellite to scientists back on shore.

    The idea was conceived in the 1980s by Doug Webb, a former WHOI research specialist who founded the Webb Research Corporation, which built the thermal glider. Webb collaborated extensively with renowned WHOI physical oceanographer Henry Stommel, who in 1989 penned an article in the journal Oceanography about a fleet of Webb’s gliding sentinels bobbing through the ocean. Webb and Stommel named the vehicles “Slocum” gliders for Joshua Slocum, the first man to single-handedly sail around the world.

    [​IMG]

    ^^^ Take a look at the guts inside a thermal glider, and you’ll find no motor to propel it. As Research Associate John Lund will tell you, the robot harvests the heat energy of the ocean itself to move through the sea. (Photo by Dave Fratantoni, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

    24/7 operations, for several months
    “Gliders can be put to work on tasks that humans wouldn’t want to do or cannot do because of time and cost concerns,” said Fratantoni, an associate scientist in the WHOI Department of Physical Oceanography. “They can work around the clock in all weather conditions.”

    The torpedo-shaped vehicle, measuring 2 meters (6.5-feet) long, descends to about 5,000 feet (1.5 kilometers) and then rises back to the surface about 2.75 miles (5 kilometers) farther on, tracing a regular roller-coaster pattern in the ocean. As it ascends sensors in the glider’s bow measure water temperature and salinity.

    At the surface, the glider reports its position and transmits data via satellite. Scientists can also transmit commands, redirecting the glider on a new route, for example.

    Though the thermal glider is not the first autonomous underwater vehicle to traverse great distances or stay at sea for long periods, it is the first to do so with green energy.

    Most gliders rely on battery-powered motors and mechanical pumps to move ballast water or oil from inside the vehicle’s hull to the outside, in order to change the vehicle’s buoyancy. The new thermal glider draws its energy for propulsion from the differences in temperature between warm surface waters heated by the sun and colder, deeper layers of the ocean.

    HOW IT WORKS

    [​IMG]

    [Check the link for flash contact: ]WHOI : Oceanus : Flash

    Here’s work it works. To descend, a valve opens, allowing oil from a flexible bladder outside the glider’s hull to flow into a bladder inside the hull. The glider’s mass remains the same, but its volume decreases. That lowers its buoyancy and makes it sink.

    Beneath the glider are external tubes filled with liquid wax. As the glider descends into deeper waters with temperatures below 50°F (10°C) range, the wax solidifies and shrinks. That creates room in the tubes for oil to flow in.

    The glider also has an internal storage tank filled with oil and nitrogen gas that is compressed to 3,000 pounds per square inch. To begin the glider’s ascent, a valve opens the storage tank, and the decompressing gas forces oil back into the external bladder. This makes the glider buoyant again and pitches its nose upward. The glider’s wings generate lift, converting the vertical motion into horizontal flight.

    As the glider rises toward the surface, where temperatures reach 80°F (27°C), the wax in the external tubes liquefies, forcing oil out of the tubes and into the storage tank. That recompresses the gas again, effectively resetting the “spring” to launch the glider’s next ascent.

    “We are tapping a virtually unlimited energy source for propulsion,” Fratantoni said. The computers, radio transmitters, and other electronics on the glider are powered by alkaline batteries, which are, for now, the principal limit on the length of operation. Webb Research is working to reduce the electrical needs of the instruments, while also developing the capability to convert some of the thermal energy to power for the electronics.

    Over the past decade, Fratantoni’s Autonomous Systems Laboratory has become Webb’s chief scientific partner in Woods Hole, testing and deploying the gliders in various underwater environments. Many battery-powered Slocum gliders have been deployed in shallower waters for coastal studies, for acoustics and marine mammal research, and for studies of currents and ocean circulation.

    —Mike Carlowicz and Lonny Lippsett

    Recent funding for scientific missions and field testing of the thermal glider system has been provided by the U.S. Office of Naval Research and the Grayce B. Kerr Fund.
     
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  16. H.A.

    H.A. Senior Member Senior Member

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    Slocum Glider

    [​IMG]

    Conceived by Douglas C. Webb and supported by Henry Stommel and others, the class of Slocum Gliders is named after Joshua Slocum, the first man to single-handedly sail around the world.

    The Slocum Glider is a uniquely mobile network component capable of moving to specific locations and depths and occupying controlled spatial and temporal grids. Driven in a sawtooth vertical profile by variable buoyancy, the glider moves both horizontally and vertically.

    The long-range and duration capabilities of Slocum gliders make them ideally suited for subsurface sampling at the regional scale. Carrying a wide variety of sensors, they can be programmed to patrol for weeks at a time, surfacing to transmit their data to shore while downloading new instructions at regular intervals, realizing a substantial cost savings compared to traditional surface ships.

    The small relative cost and the ability to operate multiple vehicles with minimal personnel and infrastructure will enable small fleets of gliders to study and map the dynamic (temporal and spatial) features of subsurface coastal waters around the clock and around the calendar.

    Webb Research Corporation - designs and manufacturers scientific instruments for oceanographic research and monitoring
     
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  17. H.A.

    H.A. Senior Member Senior Member

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  18. H.A.

    H.A. Senior Member Senior Member

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  19. H.A.

    H.A. Senior Member Senior Member

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    Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Systems Order for Saab

    [​IMG]

    Defence & security company Saab sign contract for delivery of its AUV62 Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) systems in training configuration.

    The AUV62 is an advanced and highly modern and capable system for cost-efficient training of a navy’s ASW forces. The AUV62 is an artificial acoustic target that mimics a submarine in a way that is compatible with any torpedo- and sonar system on the market today. The AUV62 system fully replaces the use of a submarine in the role as a manoeuvring training target. With the AUV62 Saab offers a state-of-the-art training capability for demanding customers investing in the future.

    The order, from an undisclosed customer, has a total value of MSEK 269 and comprises supply and long term maintenance and support of AUV62, the latest version of the advanced training target for Anti Submarine Warfare (ASW) training.

    System deliveries will take place during 2014 and 2015, followed by long term maintenance and support of the systems.

    “We are very proud of the confidence our customers place in the AUV62 system and are satisfied to have been able to secure this order for the system.” says Görgen Johansson, Senior Vice President and Head of Business Area Dynamics, Saab.
     
  20. H.A.

    H.A. Senior Member Senior Member

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    Navy undersea warfare researchers to purchase additional REMUS 100 UUV from Hydroid Inc.

    [​IMG]

    NEWPORT, R.I., 21 April 2013. U.S. Navy undersea warfare experts are buying another REMUS 100 unmanned underwater vehicle (UUV) from Hydroid Inc. in Pocasset, Mass., a wholly owned subsidiary of Kongsberg Maritime AS in Kongsberg, Norway.

    The Naval Undersea Warfare Center (NUWC) in Newport, R.I., needs the Hydroid REMUS 100 for continued development and testing, supplementing NUWC's existing inventory of REMUS systems acquired previously to support a variety of program efforts, NUWC officials say.
    The NUWC is The Navy's primary research and engineering center for underwater and submarine warfare.

    REMUS is short for Remote Environmental Measuring Unit S. The REMUS 100 slightly longer than five feet, is 7.5 inches in diameter, and weighs 85 pounds. It can operate to depths of 328 feet on missions lasting eight to 10 hours.

    Powering the REMUS 100 UUV is a direct-drive DC brushless motor and an open three-bladed propeller. It can swim as fast as 4.5 knots and navigates by Doppler-assisted dead reckoning, Inertial navigation system, and GPS.

    Operators control the REMUS 100 UUV with laptop computer-based software for programming, training, post-mission analysis, documentation, maintenance, and troubleshooting. The software enables one operator to control as many as four REMUS 100 UUVs at the same time.

    The REMUS 100 is suited to marine research, defense, hydrographic and offshore energy applications. It is small enough to be carried by two people, and can perform intricate sonar and oceanographic surveys over large areas, Hydroid officials say.

    Typical REMUS 100 applications include mine countermeasures, harbor security, debris field mapping, search and salvage operations, hydrographic surveys, environmental monitoring, fishery operations, and scientific sampling and mapping, Hydroid officials say.

    NUWC is buying the REMUS 100 UUV sole source because Hydroid is the only known source that can meet Navy requirements of a UUV that is man-portable, has an energy density of at least 1.2 kilowatt hours, Navy officials say.

    Researchers plan to use the REMUS 100 in exercises that require a UUV that can move as fast as four knots for as long as 10 hours. NUWC officials plan to release a formal request for quote (RFQ) to Hydroid around 1 May.

     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 10, 2015
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  21. cobra commando

    cobra commando Tharki regiment Veteran Member Senior Member

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    New Unmanned Underwater Vehicles take sailors out of minefields

    Unmanned Underwater Vehicle (UUV) Test Up Close - YouTube

    MANAMA, Bahrain — Unmanned Underwater Vehicles are the newest tool in sea mine warfare and a key focus during the recent U.S. 5th Fleet-led international mine countermeasure exercise in the Persian Gulf. Using 18 units of the still-experimental technology, UUVs covered 70 square nautical miles during the three-week exercise involving 41 nations.

    Testing new technology — particularly developments with the UUVs — was part of the motivation for holding the exercise so soon after a similar one eight months ago, according to U.S. 5th Fleet officials.

    Although the U.S. Navy said that the 2012 International Mine Countermeasure Exercise had accomplished its operational training goals, the global intelligence consulting firm Stratfor reported that, in fact, fewer than half of the 29 simulated mines were found.

    Senior military leaders are excited about the promising new capability of UUVs, especially in this very hot Middle East region where crew fatigue during minesweeping operations is a source of concern.

    UUVs are “much more persistent,” meaning they have the ability to hunt for mines for longer periods of time, said Vice Adm. John Miller, commander of U.S. 5th Fleet.

    He said the three-week exercise, which ended Thursday, was an opportunity to learn more about UUVs, how well they worked and how to best use them.

    “Now it’s a matter of us perfecting our procedures for using that tech and helping that technology to continue to grow,” he added.

    One of the UUVs tested during the exercise was the Mk 18 Mod 2 Remus 600, built by Hydroid Inc., a manufacturer of autonomous underwater vehicles.

    “The imagery it produces is much greater than the legacy systems that are out there,” said Jim Bass, a team leader at ITT Exelis, the company contracted by the U.S. Navy to evaluate and develop this emerging technology to meet the Navy’s objectives.

    The device can follow pre-programmed routes to map the bottom of the sea, allowing various objects, including potential sea mines, to be identified. But, because this particular UUV uses proprietary technology belonging to his company, Bass said, he could not go into detail about its full capabilities.

    His team has been in theater for a year testing the MK 18 Mod 2, but said the program has been around five years.

    Navy officials say the transition from contractor-operated systems to military-operated systems for the MK 18 Mod 2 will be complete by September 2015.

    Miller stressed that the best part of using UUVs for hunting mines is that it “takes sailors out of minefields, and inherently that is a good thing.”


    [​IMG]
    New Unmanned Underwater Vehicles take sailors out of minefields - News - Stripes
     
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