UN envoy slams Australia on Aborigines, racism 'entrenched'

Discussion in 'Defence & Strategic Issues' started by I-G, Aug 27, 2009.

  1. I-G

    I-G Tihar Jail Banned

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    UN envoy slams Australia on Aborigines, racism 'entrenched'


    Updated on Thursday, August 27, 2009, 16:33 IST Tags:UN envoy, Australia, Aborigines, Racism

    Sydney: A United Nations envoy slammed Australia's military-led crackdown on remote Aboriginal communities and said racism was "entrenched" in the country in a damning assessment on Thursday.


    UN Special Rapporteur on Indigenous Rights James Anaya said the so-called "intervention", in which thousands of troops and police were sent to help curb alcohol-fuelled sexual abuse and domestic violence, was clearly discriminatory.

    He urged the government to reinstate the Racial Discrimination Act in the Northern Territory and called for compensation for the Stolen Generations of Aboriginal children, taken from their parents to promote racial integration.

    "It undermines the right of indigenous peoples to control their own destinies, their right to self-determination," Anaya, referring to the intervention, told reporters in Canberra.

    "There is entrenched racism in Australia," he added. "These measures overtly discriminate against Aboriginal peoples, infringe their right of self-determination and stigmatise already stigmatised communities."

    Under the intervention, the conservative government of ex-prime minister John Howard slapped restrictions on welfare payments, alcohol and pornography in 73 desert townships and introduced measures to boost school attendance.

    UN envoy slams Australia on Aborigines, racism `entrenched`
     
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  3. Ratus Ratus

    Ratus Ratus Defence Professionals Defence Professionals

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    It is so nice to see this in the Indian version of ZEENEWS.COM but NOT in the international section.
    Do I call rasism here.

    As for:
    ""It undermines the right of indigenous peoples to control their own destinies, their right to self-determination," Anaya, referring to the intervention, told reporters in Canberra. "
    Yep give them their self determination, let them have alcohol , let them go sniff petrol, let the males rape the young girls under false cultural pretexts. Yep self determination.
    Determination to self inhalation.

    "restrictions on welfare payments, alcohol and pornography in 73 desert townships and introduced measures to boost school attendance."
    Yep welfare pament were restricted for food purchase not to go buy alcohol. Restrict porno, is that so bad when old men raped young girls, took them from their families under many fake pretexts. Boost schooling, very serious should never happen they might get educated. Apparently this UN guy does not see the need for eduction.

    As for the military the drongo seem to forget it is medical teams going in there. But being biased and racist as this envoy is I dount that makes any difference.
    I wonder who is actually being racist this time?

    Very selective reporting and I wonder why.. I could guess but you will not like the real reason.
     
  4. Flint

    Flint Senior Member Senior Member

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    Anaya is a graduate of the University of New Mexico (B.A., 1980) and Harvard Law School (J.D., 1983). He teaches and writes in the areas of international human rights, constitutional law, and issues concerning indigenous peoples.[1]

    Anaya has served as a consultant for organizations and government agencies in numerous countries on matters of human rights and indigenous peoples, and he has represented indigenous groups from many parts of North and Central America in land mark cases before courts and international organizations. He was the lead counsel for the indigenous parties in the case of Awas Tingni v. Nicaragua, in which the Inter-American Court of Human Rights for the first time upheld indigenous land rights as a matter of international law.[3] In addition, he directed the legal team that successfully achieved a judgment by the Supreme Court of Belize affirming the traditional land rights of the Maya people of that country.
    S. James Anaya - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
     
  5. Flint

    Flint Senior Member Senior Member

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    Anaya is a graduate of the University of New Mexico (B.A., 1980) and Harvard Law School (J.D., 1983). He teaches and writes in the areas of international human rights, constitutional law, and issues concerning indigenous peoples.[1]

    Anaya has served as a consultant for organizations and government agencies in numerous countries on matters of human rights and indigenous peoples, and he has represented indigenous groups from many parts of North and Central America in land mark cases before courts and international organizations. He was the lead counsel for the indigenous parties in the case of Awas Tingni v. Nicaragua, in which the Inter-American Court of Human Rights for the first time upheld indigenous land rights as a matter of international law.[3] In addition, he directed the legal team that successfully achieved a judgment by the Supreme Court of Belize affirming the traditional land rights of the Maya people of that country.
    S. James Anaya - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
     
  6. masterofsea

    masterofsea Regular Member

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    the infamous slave trading,genocide of American Indian,destroying of two civilizations of Inca and aztec.
    Westerns are amongst the most notorious barbarians in th history.
     
  7. Ratus Ratus

    Ratus Ratus Defence Professionals Defence Professionals

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    Yes I know but that does not excuse not provide the grounds for the alleged statements made.
    they were non factual and sensational in all intent.
    Was it the reporter or was it Anaya? If it was the reported that raises more questions on unbias reporting and deliberate attempts to incite.
     
  8. hit&run

    hit&run Elite Member Elite Member

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    sir,
    what ever you are saying is correct but your analysis about the timing and why Indian media is circulating this news has nothing to do with latest Indian students row in Australia or racism. First the news is completely plagiarized from original source, secondly the source is not Indian, thirdly Indian news channels are typical of any other news channels 'head less chickens'.
     
  9. Ratus Ratus

    Ratus Ratus Defence Professionals Defence Professionals

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    I made no mention what so ever re the student issue. Don't mix the two issues.

    The article raised racism all on its own. I replied to that and in many ways the reporting as it has a tang of maintaing racism related to students.
    It was is a media hype having a foul stench of pathetic reporting with a deliberate intent just as distasteful.

    Since the reporter has no doubt never left the comforts of the big smoke teh reporter should go hang itself.
    I have seen and been there.
     
  10. I-G

    I-G Tihar Jail Banned

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    UN critical of Australian Aboriginal intervention
    Thu Aug 27, 2009 4:08am EDT


    CANBERRA (Reuters) - A senior United Nations official condemned on Thursday Australia's controversial intervention into remote Aboriginal communities, describing the measures as discriminatory and finding entrenched racism in Australia.

    The UN Special Rapporteur on Indigenous People, James Anaya, made the findings after a 12-day visit to Australia, where he visited indigenous communities and held talks with the Australian government.

    Australia's former conservative government sent police and troops to remote Aboriginal communities in June 2007, and made special bans on alcohol and pornography, to stamp out widespread child sex abuse fueled by chronic alcoholism.

    "These measures overtly discriminate against aboriginal peoples, infringe their right of self-determination and stigmatize already stigmatized communities," Anaya told reporters in Canberra. Anaya, the first UN Rapporteur on Indigenous People to visit Aboriginal communities, congratulated Prime Minister Kevin Rudd for his 2008 parliamentary apology to Australia's Aborigines for historical injustices.

    But he said it was clear the entrenched racism of the past remained, and the ongoing intervention into communities in the Northern Territory continued to discriminate against Aborigines.

    LIFE EXPECTANCY GAP

    Rudd has made indigenous affairs a priority of his government and promised to end the 17-year gap in life expectancy between Aborigines and other Australians.

    Rudd has said he would continue the controversial intervention, which has widespread support across Australia but has been strongly criticized by some Aboriginal groups.

    Anaya's comments will increase the pressure on Rudd to review parts of the intervention, particularly measures that quarantine welfare payments to make sure a proportion of the payments is spent on food, clothing and healthcare.

    An independent review last year found the intervention affected 45,500 Aboriginal men, women and children in more than 500 Northern Territory communities, and progress on healthcare and security were undermined by a lack of full community support.

    Indigenous Affairs Minister Jenny Macklin said the government was determined to restore laws to outlaw racial discrimination in the Northern Territory and welcomed Anaya's visit.

    "I think what's important is that we recognize we have a huge task in front of us to close the gap, to close the life expectancy gap, the employment gap, the gap in education," Macklin told reporters.

    "We know how big the task is and we certainly intend to keep getting on with it."

    Australia's 460,000 Aborigines make up about 2 percent of the population. They suffer higher rates of unemployment, substance abuse and domestic violence than other Australians.

    (Editing by Alex Richardson)


    UN critical of Australian Aboriginal intervention | International | Reuters
     

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