UN adopts landmark treaty to regulate multibillion-dollar global arms

Discussion in 'International Politics' started by Daredevil, Mar 29, 2013.

  1. Daredevil

    Daredevil On Vacation! Administrator

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    India to reject global arms trade treaty (ATT)

    NEW DELHI: New Delhi is set to reject a global arms trade treaty (ATT) since the agreement is heavily loaded against weapons-importing countries like India, and let exporting nations like the US and China call the shots. The treaty, meant to regulate all transfers of conventional arms around the world, is likely to be passed by the UN General Assembly next week. India's inability to establish an indigenous defence production industry may now become a strategic vulnerability.

    New Delhi had several concerns which Indian negotiators, led by Sujata Mehta, who heads the Indian mission at the Conference on Disarmament (CD) in Geneva, fought on, but virtually none of them have been incorporated by the treaty's co-authors, led by Peter Woolacott of Australia. The current round of negotiations in New York is the second and final round. The first round, held last July, didn't have an agreement largely because the US backed out.

    India wanted the treaty to regulate arms transfers to non-state actors like terror groups. New Delhi's focus was on terror groups that target the nation or even internal insurgent groups like the Maoists but this was shot down. Countries like the US and the UK who supply arms to opposition groups such as in Syria and Libya wanted to retain the flexibility to continue to do so. Terror groups do find mention, but only in the non-binding preamble, and not in the main body. In her remarks, Mehta said, "Without such provisions, the ATT would in fact lower the bar on obligations of all states not to support terrorists and/or terrorists acts ... We cannot allow such a loophole in the ATT."

    Second, India wanted to preserve bilateral defence cooperation agreements (arms supplies are covered under such pacts) from the ATT's purview. This hasn't found favour with the treaty's authors, either. Mehta said, "Such a loophole in the Treaty would have the effect of strengthening the hands of a few exporting states at the expense of the legitimate defense and national security interests of a large number of importing states." Once this treaty goes through bilateral arms supply agreements could come under this treaty if the exporting country makes an "export assessment" under article 7 that it feels warrants stoppage of supply. This would be disastrous for India, as was evident during the Kargil war in 1999.

    India and China are the world top arms importers, according to the latest figures by SIPRI. But China itself has climbed to the top five global arms exporters last year — and the bulk of its arms exports are to Pakistan. Given the nature of China-Pakistan relationship, Islamabad is unlikely to suffer even if this treaty comes into effect. On the other hand, for India, it will become the conventional version of the global nuclear suppliers' regime. Once this treaty goes through India will have to provide similar kinds of end-user verification and access to satisfy exporters that it does with nuclear imports.

    India feels the burden of obligations rests largely on the importers because they have to satisfy the exporters on end-user verification, on keeping national records of weapons and ammunition used, etc. In fact, New Delhi wanted ammunition transfers to stay out of the treaty's scope, but that too fell by the wayside.

    A lot of international arms transfers are no longer outright sales, but incorporate leases, and even barter deals in exchange for resources etc. That should have been part of the treaty but it isn't. The treaty absolves any state which transfers arms under its own control if it states that it retains control of such arms. This means diversions and illicit transfers will continue to happen under different guises.

    The treaty applies to transfers of battle tanks, armoured combat vehicles, large caliber artillery systems, combat aircraft, attack helicopters, warships, missiles and missile launchers, small and light weapons, while ammunition and parts and components are also brought under scrutiny.

    India to reject global arms trade treaty - The Times of India
     
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  3. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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    Re: India to reject global arms trade treaty (ATT)

    This is just another of the confounded drivel pushed by the world powers. This reminds me of CTBT.

    This highlights the urgent need to expedite India's indigenous arms industry. The detractors of India's domestic arms and weapons makers, many of whom are resident here at DFI, should take into their notice that no matter how 'inferior' Indian weapons are, India will have no other option but to reduce its reliance on imported weapons and increase its reliance on domestic weapons.

    I would like to point out, that the MiG-29 was inducted even before its tests were fully complete. We need such pro-active and risk-taking attitude in India, especially among the armed forces, and that is the only way the domestic defense industries will flourish.
     
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  4. Daredevil

    Daredevil On Vacation! Administrator

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    Re: India to reject global arms trade treaty (ATT)

    The dubious & hypocritical role of so called democratic world powers is apparent from this
     
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  5. Balthazar

    Balthazar Tihar Jail Banned

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    Re: India to reject global arms trade treaty (ATT)

    I'm not sure what's so wrong with taking a stand against conventional arms proliferation. And isn't India focusing on building out a domestic arms industry anyhow? Wouldn't such a treaty provide a great incentive for domestic manufacturers to step up to the plate?
     
  6. EXPERT

    EXPERT Regular Member

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    Re: India to reject global arms trade treaty (ATT)

    what if india rejects the treaty!!!!
     
  7. arnabmit

    arnabmit Homo Communis Indus Senior Member

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    Re: India to reject global arms trade treaty (ATT)

    Pakistan supports India’s stand on UN arms treaty - Business Line

    UNITED NATIONS, MARCH 30:
    Pakistan has supported India’s stand on the UN Arms Trade Treaty that would regulate the $70-billion conventional arms trade around the world, saying that it favours the arms exporting countries and does not protects the interests of importers.

    “The treaty may be seen by many as essentially a product of and by exporters only. It falls short of striking an appropriate balance of interests and obligations among exporters and importers as well as the affected states,” said Pakistani Ambassador to the UN Masood Khan.

    In his remarks to the Arms Trade Treaty Conference at the UN headquarters in New York — which concluded on Thursday — Khan said the call for balance was echoed by an overwhelming majority.

    “Some treaty provisions, however, legitimise in a global legal instrument what the existing national and plurilateral export control systems cover. The interests of exporting countries have been accommodated in the form of special exemptions, exceptions and protections,” he has said.

    Lack of consensus

    The treaty fell apart due to lack of consensus among 193 member countries because of opposition from North Korea, Iran and Syria.

    India said the treaty in its present form would compromise with its national interest. Pakistan, however, remained silent on the second concerns raised by India.

    Proponents of the treaty have now decided to put it to vote at the UN General Assembly as early as Tuesday.

    While the final decision by India is yet to be taken, New Delhi is most likely to end up abstaining, if not voting against the draft treaty.
     
  8. indian_sukhoi

    indian_sukhoi Regular Member

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    Re: India to reject global arms trade treaty (ATT)

    Has expected, Arms trade treaty favours the exporters and against the importers
     
  9. SajeevJino

    SajeevJino Long walk Elite Member

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    UN adopts landmark treaty to regulate multibillion-dollar global arms


    The U.N. General Assembly overwhelmingly approved the first international treaty regulating the multibillion-dollar global arms trade Tuesday, after a more than decade-long campaign to keep weapons from falling into the hands of terrorists, warlords, organized crime figures and human rights violators.


    [​IMG]

    Loud cheers erupted in the assembly chamber as the electronic board flashed the final vote: 154 in favor, 3 against and 23 abstentions.

    “This is a victory for the world’s people,” U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said. “The Arms Trade Treaty will make it more difficult for deadly weapons to be diverted into the illicit market. ... It will be a powerful new tool in our efforts to prevent grave human rights abuses or violations of international humanitarian law.”

    The United States, the world’s biggest arms exporter, voted yes.

    Iran, North Korea and Syria — all facing arms embargoes — cast the only no votes. They argued, among other things, that the agreement favors major arms suppliers like the U.S. over importers that need weapons for self-defense.

    Russia and China, which are also major arms exporters, abstained along with India and Indonesia, while nuclear-armed Pakistan voted in favor. Many Arab countries, including Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Sudan and Qatar, abstained, while Lebanon voted yes.

    Never before has there been a treaty regulating the global arms trade, which is estimated to be worth $60 billion today and which Amnesty International predicts will exceed $100 billion in the next four years.

    “Today’s victory shows that ordinary people who care about protecting human rights can fight back to stop the gun lobby dead in its tracks, helping to save countless lives,” said Frank Jannuzi, deputy executive director of Amnesty International USA.

    As for its chances of being ratified by the U.S., the powerful National Rifle Association has vehemently opposed it, and it is likely to face stiff resistance from conservatives in the Senate, where it needs two-thirds to win ratification.

    Secretary of State John Kerry called it a “strong, effective and implementable” treaty and stressed that it applies only to international deals and “reaffirms the sovereign right of any state to regulate arms within its territory.”

    The treaty prohibits countries that ratify it from exporting conventional weapons if they violate arms embargoes, or if they promote acts of genocide, crimes against humanity or war crimes, or if they could be used in attacks against civilians or schools and hospitals.

    Countries must also evaluate whether the weapons would be used by terrorists or organized crime or would undermine peace and security. They must take measures to prevent the weapons from being diverted to the black market.

    At the end of the final negotiating conference last week, Iran, North Korea and Syria blocked another attempt at consensus. Over those countries’ objections, the treaty’s supporters decided to put it to a vote in the General Assembly.

    UN adopts landmark treaty to regulate multibillion-dollar global arms trade - The Washington Post
     
  10. drkrn

    drkrn Senior Member Senior Member

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    Re: UN adopts landmark treaty to regulate multibillion-dollar global a

    can some one tell its implications on indian exports.any loop holes?
     
  11. Armand2REP

    Armand2REP CHINI EXPERT Veteran Member

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    Re: UN adopts landmark treaty to regulate multibillion-dollar global a

    Unless GoI is violating human rights, it won't have any.
     
  12. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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  13. arnabmit

    arnabmit Homo Communis Indus Senior Member

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  14. felixmtt

    felixmtt New Member

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    The First global arms trade treaty

    The First global arms trade treaty was approved last month. 154 countries voted in favor, 23 did not vote, excluding Iran & North Korea.

    What do you thing would be the major effect for countries voting in favor of it?
     
  15. drkrn

    drkrn Senior Member Senior Member

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    Re: UN adopts landmark treaty to regulate multibillion-dollar global a

    action against maoists--australia considers it to be hr violation and refuses to sell weapons 2 india
     

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