UAVs and UCAVs

Discussion in 'Military Aviation' started by LETHALFORCE, Apr 4, 2009.

  1. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    http://www.israeli-weapons.com/weapons/aircraft/uav/harpy/harpy.html

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    HARPY is a lethal UAV designed to detect, attack and destroy radar emitters.

    Harpy is a "Fire-and-Forget" all-weather, day/night autonomous weapon system, launched from a ground vehicle behind the battle zone or from ship based launchers.

    HARPY effectively suppresses hostile SAM and radar sites for long duration, by detecting, attacking and destroying radar targets with a very high hit accuracy.

    HARPY provides the most effective solution to the hostile radar problem, at the lowest price. HARPY is in production, is already operational with several nations Air Forces, and is currently available.

    Weighs 135 kg, 2.1 meter long, 2.7 meter span and with range of 500 km. It is sealed in its sealed launcher/container, to endure harsh battlefield conditions. It can be fueled or defueled in the launcher, therefore retaining its readiness at all time. The system uses periodical built-in test to maintain full readiness.

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    Harpy Delivered to India

    According to media reports, the Indian army has purchased a number of the armed Harpy drone, produced by Israel Aircraft Industries.
     
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  3. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    Harpy Air Defense Suppression System

    http://defense-update.com/directory/harpy.htm


    Harpy Air Defense Suppression System

    Dedicated for the Suppression of Air Defense (SEAD) mission, Harpy is an operational loitering attack weapon. The current version of Harpy is deployed as a fire and forget weapon. It patrols the assigned area, and will attack any hostile radar activated in its vicinity. When used in appropriate numbers, Harpy can be launched into a target area to support continuous operations, or time limited strike packages. Unlike anti-radar missiles such as HARM, whose speed, range and direction of approach are predictable, the killer drone deployment is more flexible and unpredictable, and therefore, conventional countermeasures techniques are not useful against it. In fact, Harpy is holding enemy radars at risk throughout its mission. Harpy system is designed to operate multiple munitions simultaneously over a specific area, to effectively cover the target. Each drone is deployed autonomously, without interference and overlapping the other drones.

    The Harpy mission is planned and programmed in the battery ground control center, as an independent mission, or planned in accordance with other manned or unmanned systems. Prior to launch, individual weapons are programmed and tested, to verify their operational readiness. After the rocket-assisted launch, the drone flies autonomously enroute to its patrol area, predefined by a set of navigational waypoints. Due to its low speed and economical fuel consumption, the drone can sustain a mission of several hours over the target area. Its radar seeker head constantly search for hostile radars, both along and across the flight track. Once suspicious radar is acquired, Harpy compares the signal to the library of hostile emitters, and prioritizes the threat. If the target is verified, the drone enters an attack mode, as it transitions into a near vertical dive, homing on the signal. The drone is set to detonate its warhead just above the target, to generate the highest damage to the antennae, and surrounding facilities. If the radar is turned off before Harpy strikes, the drone can abort the attack and continue loitering. If no radar was spotted during the mission, the drone is programmed to self destruct over a designated area. Follow-on systems which are already proposed to foreign clients, are calling for a combination of seeker and killer drones that will enable visual identification and attack of targets even after they turn off their emitters.

    The drone weighs 135 kg, and is 2.1 meter long with a 2.7 meter span. It is sealed in its sealed launcher/container, to endure harsh battlefield conditions. It can be fueled or defueled in the launcher, therefore retaining its readiness at all time. The system uses periodical built-in test to maintain full readiness. In order to verify the drone’s operational capability, its seeker head is being tested by a special radar simulator just before launch, to ensure that all systems are working.

    The radar killer drone is launched from a canister which is also used as a launcher. Current Harpy modules are installed on trucks, and can be carried by C-130 transport aircraft. Each truck carries 18 weapon launchers. Each battery of Harpy is composed of three trucks, capable of deploying up to 54 drones for simultaneous, coordinated attack. The battery also has a ground control station and logistical support element. The system can also be deployed from the decks of assault landing ships, in support of marine or amphibious operations.

    Harpy is currently operational with the Turkish, Korean, Chinese and Indian Armies, in addition to the Israel Air Force. In December 2004 China was reported to be interested in an upgrade of its systems to a more advanced version. Part of this work, conducted at IAI in 2005 caused severe friction between Jerusalem and Washington, as the Pentagon blamed Israel of assisting China in modernizing its weapon in breach of its agreements with the USA. In October 2005 a derivative of Harpy presented by MBDA in cooperation with IAI/MBT Division was selected as one of the finalists for the UK Loitering Munition Capability Demonstration (LMCD) program.
     
  4. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    http://www.space.com/spacenews/archive05/israelindia_022805.html


    India, Israel Partner To Develop Three New UAVs

    By By VIVEK RAGHUVANSHI
    Space News Correspondent
    posted: 01 March 2005
    03:54 pm ET








    BANGALORE, India -- India and Israel have entered into a new partnership under which Tel Aviv will help New Delhi in its development of remote vehicles.



    A formal deal was signed at the Aero India 2005 exposition Feb. 9-13 here between senior officials of the respective defense ministries. Israel Aircraft Industries will assist the state-owned Aeronautical Development Establishment (ADE) here, India's leading unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) laboratory, to develop three new UAVs.



    Moshe Keret, Israel Aircraft Industries' chief executive, said Feb. 9 that UAVs are an important segment for collaboration, and the company will be working on defense research and development programs to benefit both countries.

    A senior ADE scientist on Feb. 10 said ADE and Israel Aircraft Industries will work to develop three remotely piloted vehicles: the Rustam medium-alti¬tude long-endurance UAV, the Pawan short-range UAV and the Gagan tactical UAV.



    Currently, all of India's UAV needs are met by Israel, and this partnership will ensure that will continue to be the case for at least the near future.

    The $100 million Rustam UAV development program will begin officially in June, although work already has begun on planned subsystems. The ADE scientist said this drone is the test case for the overall joint UAV development program. Israel Aircraft Industries and ADE have begun preparatory work that involves testing major subsystems on a manned aircraft here.



    The Rustam will be able to remain aloft for more than 24 hours and have a range of up to 300 kilometers and a maximum altitude of 10,000 meters. It will be able to use satellite links to transmit data, thereby extending its surveillance range beyond 1,000 kilometers.



    The 1,100-kilogram UAV also will be equipped with a maritime patrol radar and electro-optic sensors from Israel, and an engine still to be determined. The electronic warfare and communications system will be indigenous.



    This UAV will be used by India's three military services and will not be exported, the ADE scientist said.



    The Rustam program is likely to be completed in 48 months, during which four prototypes will be produced.

    Development of the short-range, vehicle-mounted Pawan is expected to cost $33.2 million. Meant to equip Indian army divisions, the Pawan will be comparable in size and capabilities to Israel's Eye View, Hermes 180 and Silver Arrow drones, the scientist said.



    The 120-kilogram Pawan will have day-and-night surveillance capability, an endurance of five hours and a range of 150 kilometers.



    ADE plans to build four Pawan prototypes under this development program, with Israel Aircraft Industries electro-optic sensors for the payload and its own stabilizer platform. The engine will be purchased from outside India.



    The ADE scientist said the Defence Ministry will approve the funding in April, and the four prototypes are likely to be completed within 24 months.

    The $55.5 million Gagan UAV pro¬gram will feature development of an advanced version of India's Nishant UAV.

    The Gagan UAV will have a range of 250 kilometers and an altitude of 6,000 meters.

    ADE will procure synthetic aperture radar and electro-optic sensors from Israel, and develop its own electronic countermeasure systems.

    ADE is likely to get the funding clearance in May, and four prototypes will be built within 42 months.
     
  5. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    UAV-Nishant and Rustam

    http://www.zeenews.com/Nation/2009-02-12/506901news.html

    ADE to soon hand over unmanned aerial vehicle to Indian Army

    Bangalore, Feb 12: The Aeronautical Development Establishment (ADE) will soon hand over the country's first unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) Nishant to the Indian Army.

    "A limited series is being specially produced for the army as per their requirements. It is ready for delivery and confirmatory trials are being planned," Nishant project director G Srinivasa Murthy told reporters.

    Nishant's features include multi-mission day and night capability for using advance payloads, jam resistant command link and digital down link. With an endurance capacity of 4 hours and 30 minutes, it can attain maximum speed of 185 km per hour.

    Talking about future projects of the ADE such as the Medium Altitude Long Endurance (MALE) UAV Rustam, he said that it will have 300 km range with 200 kg payload and would be ready to fly in about 3 years from now.

    Rustam can be useful in reconnaissance and surveillance, target acquisition and designation, communications relay and signal intelligence.

    "ADE has also embarked upon an ambitious programme to build another UAV that has multi-mission capability," Murthy said adding that his organisation has acquired 4,200 acres of land in Chitragurga district in Karnataka to build a test range only for UAVs.
     
  6. Pintu

    Pintu New Member

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    Very Good thread LF, Thanks for posting, have you the picture of Rustam?
     
  7. screwterrorists

    screwterrorists Founding Member

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    isnt the harpy somewhat of a modified cruise missile?
     
  8. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

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    tharikiran likes this.
  9. Pintu

    Pintu New Member

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    The third was is looking Awesome.
     
  10. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    Israel Unveils Loitering Anti-Missile Drone

    http://defense-update.com/products/h/harop.html

    Israel Unveils Loitering Anti-Missile Drone

    Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI) is developing a loitering killer drone that has the capability to hunt illusive ground targets, such as anti-aircraft systems and mobile or concealed ballistic missile launchers. This expendable unmanned aerial vehicles, known as Harop, can be launched over a suspected area without specifically acquiring a specific target. Designed to reach targets at distances over 1,000km away, the UAV loiter over a suspected area for hours, spot target as they are exposed before activation and attack them immediately. IAI is already negotiating potential export sales of the weapon with India and Turkey. The company exposed the system for the first time in India, before the Aero-India 2009 airshow.

    Harop resembles an earlier IAI's 'suicide drone' known as Harpy. The main differences are the outer wing extensions, the longer nose and canard foreplane. Like Harpy, Harrop is launched from a vehicle-mounted container. Harop augments the Harpy's RF seeker with an electro-optical sensor, allowing it to acquire and pursue non emitting targets and moving targets, as well as 'quit' targets such as shut-down radars. As a loitering weapon, Harop can also be used against suspected ballistic missile sites, where target missile silos and shelters as they are opened before firing.

    India is considering acquiring Harpy 2 (also known as 'Harop') killer drones developed by Israel Aerospace Industries, as part of a procurement program valued over $US1 billion. Harop is an evolution of the Harpy killer drone, optimized to operate against enemy radars and surface/air missiles. Harpy was developed in the 1990s and has been successfully exported to countries around the world.

    Turkey is also interested in this Lethal Unmanned Aerial System capability and by the end of 2008 the Ministry of Defense was considering enhancing the Harpy radar killer drone capability with the loitering killer drone version of the system.

    The Harop has evolved at IAI through a series of international cooperations that have never fully matured. In 1999 IAI discussed a joint prograp Raytheon known as the "Cutlass", pursuing a 'Combat Uninhabited Target Locate and Strike System'. Initially displayed in the Paris Air Show in 1999, the system combined the airframe of the Harpy UAV, made by Israel Aircraft Industries, with advanced sensors made by Raytheon Systems, which also manufactures the HARM (High Speed Anti-Radiation) missile. Cutlass was adapted for ship-based operations to support US Navy operations over land. It is designed for six hours missions, flying at speed of 100 knots and maximum range of 1,000 km. Unlike the autonomous Harpy, Cutlass also has a direct line-of-sight datalink capability at range up to 150 km. This range can be extended via relays built into each weapon.

    In October 2005 Harop dubbed 'White Hawk', was presented to the UK Ministry of Defense, by a team lead by MBDA that also included IAI/MBT Division. Although MBDA was eventually selected as one of the finalists for the UK Loitering Munition Capability Demonstration (LMCD) program (which later evolved into the Fire Shadow), White Hawk was not selected for the program, as the MOD insisted on an 'all British' team.
     
  11. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    New Israel killer drone can take out Iran's S-300 anti-air missile

    http://www.1913intel.com/2009/02/25...ne-can-take-out-irans-s-300-anti-air-missile/


    New Israel killer drone can take out Iran's S-300 anti-air missile

    DEBKAfile Special Report

    March 3, 2009, 9:19 AM (GMT+02:00)
    Israeli drone can hit anti-air missile before its activation

    Israeli drone can hit anti-air missile before its activation

    The Israeli air industries first unveiled its new Harop "loiter drone" for taking out ground-to-air missiles at the annual Aero-India 2009 air show which closed recently at Bangalore.

    The Iranian media were first to disclose that this sophisticated Israeli drone is capable of targeting the Russian radar-equipped S-300 anti-air missile before it enters attack mode .

    DEBKAfile's military sources report that while Iran has contracted to buy from Russia five S-300 batteries worth $800 m to defend its nuclear sites against potential aerial attack, India and Turkey are interested in Israel's Harop killer-drone. Our sources report that the Tehran media made much of the new Israeli drone as a means of pushing Moscow to set the new batteries' delivery dates which the Russian suppliers have so far withheld.

    The Harop is an upgraded version of the Harpy with more advanced features for taking out radar installations and anti-air missile installations. It can travel 1,000 km to patrol an assigned area and loiter there until a hostile target is exposed. Its 23-kilo warhead then strikes the target before it is activated in attack mode.

    The Russian S-300 missile purchased by Tehran is one such target. It is classified in the West as a "game-changer" designed to rule out air attacks on its nuclear sites. This missile system is capable of engaging up to 100 targets at once, tracking targets with a mobile radar station which is immune to jamming.

    The Harop is an expendable unmanned aerial vehicle which can sustain a mission of several hours over an assigned area. Operated by electro-optical sensors, Harop can detect weapons systems in inert mode, weapons on the move and radar installations switched off to avoid detection.

    Our military experts maintain that once it penetrates Iranian airspace, this drone can silence surface-to-air batteries and open the skies to aerial and missile attack.
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  12. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    Israel to sell 50 Heron UAV's to India

    http://www.india-defence.com/reports/840

    Israel to sell 50 Heron UAV's to India
    Daily News & Updates
    India Defence Premium
    Dated 8/11/2005

    Jerusalem: Israel will sell 50 unmanned spy drones worth $220 m to India, public radio reported on Tuesday. The Heron drones can fly at an altitude of 30,000 feet, are equipped with camera and surveillance technology, automatic take-off and landing system and are suitable for all weather conditions, the radio said.

    The 250-kilo drones can stay airborne for more than 40 minutes. Questioned by AFP, a defence ministry official refused to confirm or deny the report, saying only that the department did not release information about such armaments contracts.

    After decades of cold relations, India and Israel have established strong military ties, illustrated by New Delhi's purchase of three Phalcon advanced air warning systems from the Jewish state in March 2004.

    Under the terms of the agreement, Israel was to buy Ilyushin-76 cargo aircraft from Uzbekistan, which would then be sent to Russia to be fitted with new high-powered engines.

    After structural modifications, the aircraft were to be sent to Israel to be mounted with the Airborne Warning and Control System (AWACS) radar system and the complete aircraft delivered to India.
     
  13. Payeng

    Payeng Daku Mongol Singh

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    Can anybody explain how a 300 km plus weaopn being traded to india.
     
  14. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    it is not a missile so it does not violate MCTR.
     
  15. Pintu

    Pintu New Member

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    We need those Harops in our inventory.
     
  16. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    we have them ,and many others; and more to come
     
  17. Payeng

    Payeng Daku Mongol Singh

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    Even UAV's falls under MCTR
     
  18. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    UAV are not classified under missiles, than same logic could apply to warplanes and subs?
     
  19. Payeng

    Payeng Daku Mongol Singh

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    AFAIK bans are practiced for missiles, UAV's or any dual use technology that can be use to deliver nuclear warheads etc. warplanes are excluded from the treaty considering that they are not unmanned, but maybe long range military aircraft may again fall under the same treaty (such as bombers, patrolling aircrafts) though I am not 100% sure of my last point.

    I think 135 kg load capacity of the HARPY is not considered as nuke deliverable and moreover India don't practice use of chemical and biological weapons anymore, so, what say?
     
  20. Pintu

    Pintu New Member

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  21. Shiny Capstar

    Shiny Capstar Defence Professionals Defence Professionals

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    I assume after it is launched there is no getting it back, a bit like our (British) Fire Shadow (the Harpy may well be the basis for the Fire Shadow, as is suggested at the end of the article).

    Also, can you make it so that it will go after some radar types over others, (target priority), to hit the radar that would present the largest threat to an airpackage for example (eg going after an SA-10 targeting radar over an SA-2 detection radar). Or would it go after the first radar it sees.
    A bit of an oversimplification I know but still some insight would be appreciated.
     

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