U.S. Media Compares Sachin Tendulkar's Exit To Mahatma Gandhi's Death

Discussion in 'Sports' started by bhramos, Nov 18, 2013.

  1. bhramos

    bhramos Elite Member Elite Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2009
    Messages:
    13,206
    Likes Received:
    6,638
    Location:
    Telangana/India/Bharat
    New York: Cricket may not be too big a sport in this part of the world but leading U.S. publications have nonetheless paid tribute to retiring Indian superstar Sachin Tendulkar, applauding the veteran batsman for his "supreme" talent and a career lived with soft-spoken integrity and humility.

    "This week, for more than a billion people, the world as they know it effectively comes to an end. The second Test match between India and the West Indies ...will be the last international appearance of one Sachin Ramesh Tendulkar," a Wall Street Journal article titled 'Farewell to Cricket's Little Master' said.

    An op-ed in the New York Times likened Tendulkar's retirement from cricket to the death of Mahatma Gandhi.

    "As the moment of his (Tendulkar's) departure looms, the country is in the fevered throes of one last, mammoth celebration, but also on the un-self-conscious brink of mourning," the NYT op-ed piece titled 'Where the Gods Live On ... and On' said.

    The Time magazine put out a special online feature highlighting Tendulkar's 10 greatest moments, including his 664-run unbroken partnership with fellow cricketer Vinod Kambli in 1988, becoming the captain of the Indian team in 1996 at age 23, surpassing Caribbean great Brian Lara to become the highest run scorer in Test history in 2008 and the 2011 World Cup win.

    U.S. Media Compares Sachin Tendulkar's Exit To Mahatma Gandhi's Death
     
  2.  
  3. jmj_overlord

    jmj_overlord Regular Member

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2013
    Messages:
    694
    Likes Received:
    154
    Location:
    Cochin
    Re: U.S. Media Compares Sachin Tendulkar's Exit To Mahatma Gandhi's De

    wow, the respect for tendulkar even in countries like US where cricket is not heard of by majority of the people even though there is a national cricket team, is simply amazing
     
  4. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,118
    Likes Received:
    23,543
    Location:
    Somewhere
    Re: U.S. Media Compares Sachin Tendulkar's Exit To Mahatma Gandhi's De

    It is a bit superciliously condescending to believe that a cricketer can be compared to what the Mahatma did or achieve for India.

    It is laughable to learn from the US that they feel that a cricketer could achieve what the Mahatma did.

    I have not seen such a stupid comparison ever before.

    I am sure this was written by some bootlicking Indian who is now an American citizen.
     
    W.G.Ewald and Eastman like this.
  5. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,118
    Likes Received:
    23,543
    Location:
    Somewhere
    Re: U.S. Media Compares Sachin Tendulkar's Exit To Mahatma Gandhi's De

    Here is the boot licking Indian's article

    Where the Gods Live On ... and On
    Sachin Tendulkar Finally Retires From Cricket


    [​IMG]

    By TUNKU VARADARAJAN
    Published: November 13, 2013


    A POPULAR Indian historian once remarked to me that India is a country where men don’t age well, and of no one is this observation truer than of Sachin Ramesh Tendulkar, a man who is, at 40 years and some 200 days, the oldest member of India’s cricket team.

    But let me first be complimentary. Mr. Tendulkar, whom everyone calls Sachin, is the most revered cricketer in India; in fact, it would be entirely accurate to describe him as the most revered contemporary Indian, or even, with only a pinch of hyperbole, the most revered Indian since Mahatma Gandhi held the nation in thrall. Suspend your disbelief and think of him as a cross between Babe Ruth and Martin Luther King.

    Sachin currently dominates India’s imagination even more than usual: Today, in his native Mumbai, he will begin playing his 200th test match (as the five-day version of cricket is called), when India takes on the West Indies, a once-mighty team now fallen on hard times. It will also be his last test match, for he will retire from competitive cricket after the game. As the moment of his departure looms, the country is in the fevered throes of one last, mammoth celebration, but also on the un-self-conscious brink of mourning. As Nehru said on Gandhi’s death, so India will say on the day Sachin hangs up his white cricket flannels: “The light has gone out of our lives and there is darkness everywhere.” (India mourns in purple prose.)

    At the same time, there is also, remarkably, an unsentimental view of Sachin, which is that he should have retired two years ago (or more), that he has stayed at the wicket much too long.

    There is no Indian tradition of graceful retirement. The inherent human vanity of an authority reluctant to cede the public stage is reinforced by a culture of adulation, of shrieking, ululating crowds, of an uncritical elevation of heroes to godlike status by devotees who will not let go. In politics, in cinema, even in corporate business houses, old Indian men do not fade into the sunset. They hobble on and on. And when they die, they are “kept alive” by heirs who succeed them: sons, daughters, wives. Sport, by its very nature, is different: there is no elegant case for heirs on a cricket team, and the body imposes its own laws of retirement.

    Yet Sachin and his fans have tried their best to defy those natural laws. After all, idolatry is an Indian art form. Some Indian gods have three heads, or 10 arms. Others have serpents coiled around their torsos, or rivers streaming from their heads. And one, Sachin, wields a sacred cricket bat, heavy, sweet, made of the finest willow.

    In a land of chronic inefficiency, he was remorselessly efficient; in a land with a global inferiority complex, he was the best in the world; in a land where public figures are strutting peacocks, he was often a picture of painful humility; in a land that thirsts for self-respect, Sachin spelled pride.

    When he first played for India — in 1989, at age 16, against the old enemy, Pakistan — the country was adrift economically. National morale hit a nadir in 1991, with India pawning gold reserves to stay afloat. Sachin’s blossoming coincided with the economic liberalization that followed, and his cricketing splendor tracked a healthy, sometimes rollicking, growth rate. In his success, he embodied a new Indian self-image. Other heroes have since emerged: younger, brasher, like the New India itself, but Sachin’s heroism reminds the country of a more vulnerable time, and he is loved the more for that.

    In purely sporting terms, however, he is but a shadow of his old self, in which he shone as one of the three or four finest players cricket has produced in its long, languorous history. He is now merely a “good” or “better than average” player. Had he been only 24 and this proficient, he’d be an honest contender for a place on the national team. But he is now so much less good than he once was that, when he plays, the more dispassionate among us can see only an ugly gulf between Sachin’s apogee and his plateau.

    There is more: For a man who built his reputation not just on supreme batsmanship but also on his unwavering modesty, impeccable manners and an evident pleasure in being part of (and never greater than) the team on which he played, there has been an unlovely whiff of selfishness in his reluctance to give way to younger players, in his limpetlike clinging to his place, and in his relentless pursuit of milestones. No cricketer has ever played 200 test matches before. No other cricketer will. Sachin managed the feat only because he has batted on for 24 years.

    But we shouldn’t blame Sachin. In any other land, he would have aged, recognized the limitations brought on by age ... and moved on. India has not let him do so. It is India, by its corrosive love, that has betrayed Sachin Tendulkar.

    Tunku Varadarajan is a research fellow at the Hoover Institution

    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/14/opinion/tendulkar-finally-retires-from-cricket.html?_r=0

    *******************************************************

    Note his style of writing.

    It reminds me of those Indians who just have enough time to dip their toes in the Hudson River and become more American than Americans themselves.

    There is no end of such pseudo around.

    He may kiss the ground on which Tendulkar may have walked thinking their will be oil beneath it, but it does not mean he represents India or a country that is un-self-conscious brink of mourning or a land of chronic inefficiency, he was remorselessly efficient; in a land with a global inferiority complex,

    It is these Jonny come Lately Green Card aspirants who out American Americans and suffer a huge inferiority complex themselves!]

    It is these type of skunks who let India down abroad and are the worst specimen of India unfortunately released abroad like unbridled virus, feeding and proliferating on the gullibility of the foreigners who enjoy the 'stupidlity' presented by such to fit their stereotype image of countries of the mystic Orient!
     
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2013
    W.G.Ewald, Dovah and Tolaha like this.
  6. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2012
    Messages:
    20,982
    Likes Received:
    11,810
    Location:
    Akhand Bharat
    Re: U.S. Media Compares Sachin Tendulkar's Exit To Mahatma Gandhi's De

    Well sachin is more popular than Gandhi in India Isn"t??
     
  7. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,118
    Likes Received:
    23,543
    Location:
    Somewhere
    Re: U.S. Media Compares Sachin Tendulkar's Exit To Mahatma Gandhi's De

    Imagine the audacity:

    Some Indian gods have three heads, or 10 arms. Others have serpents coiled around their torsos, or rivers streaming from their heads.

    I am not aware of Gods with three heads.

    Could someone educate me?

    Or does this man consider his three gonads as part of HIS God?
     
    W.G.Ewald likes this.
  8. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,118
    Likes Received:
    23,543
    Location:
    Somewhere
    Re: U.S. Media Compares Sachin Tendulkar's Exit To Mahatma Gandhi's De

    Popular?

    He has been booed many a time.

    He as even doubted of being sold when he declared in a game that could have been won.

    He is a good cricketer and there is no doubt about that.

    But a God?

    Maybe for you.

    For many in India, God does not come so cheap!
     
  9. Free Karma

    Free Karma Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2013
    Messages:
    2,372
    Likes Received:
    2,576
    Location:
    Chennai
    Re: U.S. Media Compares Sachin Tendulkar's Exit To Mahatma Gandhi's De

    NYT....I'm not surprised, it amazes me, how they manage to hire the most boneheaded people in that paper. I really dont understand what these guys are trying to do lol.
     
    W.G.Ewald likes this.
  10. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2012
    Messages:
    20,982
    Likes Received:
    11,810
    Location:
    Akhand Bharat
    Re: U.S. Media Compares Sachin Tendulkar's Exit To Mahatma Gandhi's De

    no he is not my GOD


    well by looking at his popularity he is popular than many GODs in India.
     
  11. p2prada

    p2prada Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

    Joined:
    May 25, 2009
    Messages:
    10,233
    Likes Received:
    3,896
    Location:
    Holy Hell
    Re: U.S. Media Compares Sachin Tendulkar's Exit To Mahatma Gandhi's De

    Michael Phelps is as great as George Washington and Horatio Gates anyway.

    They are soon gonna print notes with his face on 'em.
     
  12. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,118
    Likes Received:
    23,543
    Location:
    Somewhere
    Re: U.S. Media Compares Sachin Tendulkar's Exit To Mahatma Gandhi's De

    Popularity?

    Aldus Huxley had said - To his dog, every man is Napoleon;

    In South India, they commit suicide for their Leaders.

    Now that could be termed as Blind Faith and Popularity.

    How many will do so for Tendulkar?

    Already Kohli and others are taking his place and he will be just another statistics and nothing more.

    Heard of Dyan Chand?

    He put India on the sports map.

    How many remember him today?

    Passing ships in the Night.

    But Mahatma.

    Like him or hate him, he endures.

    so there is no comparison and in fact to compare is an insult to the Mahatma!
     
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2013
    bhramos likes this.
  13. bhramos

    bhramos Elite Member Elite Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2009
    Messages:
    13,206
    Likes Received:
    6,638
    Location:
    Telangana/India/Bharat
    Re: U.S. Media Compares Sachin Tendulkar's Exit To Mahatma Gandhi's De

    he might become another kapil or gavasker... same happened when they were retired....... but they were not rich as sachin..
     
  14. debasree

    debasree Regular Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2011
    Messages:
    811
    Likes Received:
    82
    Location:
    Calcutta, India, India
    Re: U.S. Media Compares Sachin Tendulkar's Exit To Mahatma Gandhi's De

    A legend in games but most imp a true human
     
  15. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,118
    Likes Received:
    23,543
    Location:
    Somewhere
    Re: U.S. Media Compares Sachin Tendulkar's Exit To Mahatma Gandhi's De

    Did he give any of his millions to charity?

    I am not too aware.

    He sure did give signed bats that got a lot of money for charity.

    True Indian!
     
    Voldemort likes this.
  16. Free Karma

    Free Karma Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2013
    Messages:
    2,372
    Likes Received:
    2,576
    Location:
    Chennai
    Re: U.S. Media Compares Sachin Tendulkar's Exit To Mahatma Gandhi's De

    If he donated money and boasted about it people would take that as a negative trait, if he doesnt talk about then people will never know! Pretty hard situation to be in.

    Google brings up a few results, It doesnt have to be just giving away money, throwing the spotlight and enabling funds to come in is also a use of his celeb power for a good cause.
     
  17. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,118
    Likes Received:
    23,543
    Location:
    Somewhere
    Re: U.S. Media Compares Sachin Tendulkar's Exit To Mahatma Gandhi's De

    Person of stature and their work, good or bad, is always known to all.

    Take Salman Khan for instance.

    There are many such cases.

    I heard Bal Thackray's interview with Times Now (?)

    He mentioned that while Sachin was magnanimous and helped charity, he did not do with his personal wealth, but by signing bats which got good money for charitable causes.
     
  18. Free Karma

    Free Karma Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2013
    Messages:
    2,372
    Likes Received:
    2,576
    Location:
    Chennai
    Re: U.S. Media Compares Sachin Tendulkar's Exit To Mahatma Gandhi's De


    Salman takes every oppotunity to talk about his charity, and also walks around with a T-shirt that has being human on it.
    Steve Jobs was criticised similarly, but after his death they found out about the money he gave to charitable causes, as far as sachin goes, google and you can find out his work with children and cancer.
     
  19. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2012
    Messages:
    20,982
    Likes Received:
    11,810
    Location:
    Akhand Bharat
    Re: U.S. Media Compares Sachin Tendulkar's Exit To Mahatma Gandhi's De

    Charity is other name of making black money into white by corporates and rich


    I will never give money to charity rather help individuals
     
    Voldemort likes this.
  20. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,118
    Likes Received:
    23,543
    Location:
    Somewhere
  21. Eastman

    Eastman Regular Member

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2013
    Messages:
    325
    Likes Received:
    169
    Location:
    Bye Bye DFI
    Re: U.S. Media Compares Sachin Tendulkar's Exit To Mahatma Gandhi's De

    Sachin Tendulkar is a talented sportsman but in no way he can be compared to Mahatma Gandhi.
     

Share This Page