U.S. Air Force Launches First-Of-Its-Kind Space Based Infrared System Satellite

Discussion in 'Americas' started by Someoneforyou, May 8, 2011.

  1. Someoneforyou

    Someoneforyou Regular Member

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    Lockheed Martin-Built Next Generation Missile Warning Satellite Launched Successfully
    UNITED STATES - 7 MAY 2011

    The U.S. Air Force’s SBIRS GEO-1 spacecraft is the most technologically advanced military infrared satellite ever developed.


    CAPE CANAVERAL AIR FORCE STATION, Fla., May 7th, 2011 -- The first Space Based Infrared System (SBIRS) geosynchronous (GEO-1) spacecraft, built by Lockheed Martin for the U.S. Air Force, was successfully launched today at 2:10 p.m. EDT from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket. SBIRS GEO-1 is the most technologically advanced military infrared satellite ever developed and will deliver vastly improved missile warning capabilities for the nation while simultaneously improving the Nation’s missile defense, technical intelligence and battlespace awareness mission areas.

    “Today’s successful launch is a tribute to the hard work, dedication and unmatched expertise of the entire government and industry SBIRS team. I am proud of the women and men who have worked on this spacecraft, and am confident the nation will be proud of its performance on orbit,” said Brig Gen (select) Roger W. Teague, the U.S. Air Force’s Infrared Space Systems Directorate director. “SBIRS GEO-1 represents the dawn of a new era in overhead persistent infrared surveillance that will greatly improve our national security for years to come.”


    SBIRS GEO-1 includes highly sophisticated scanning and staring sensors that will deliver improved infrared sensitivity and a reduction in area revisit times over the current constellation. The scanning sensor will provide a wide area surveillance of missile launches and natural phenomena across the earth, while the staring sensor will be used to observe smaller areas of interest with superior sensitivity. These dual independent sensors will enhance early warning of missile launches around the globe, support the nation's ballistic missile defense system, greatly expand our technical intelligence gathering capability, and bolster situational awareness for warfighters on the battlefield.

    “We understand the importance of the SBIRS mission and are proud to partner with the U.S. Air Force on this critical program,” said Jeff Smith, Lockheed Martin’s vice president and SBIRS program director. “Throughout the development of this first-of-its-kind satellite, our SBIRS team has demonstrated an unwavering commitment to operational excellence. As a result, we are confident SBIRS GEO-1 will deliver unprecedented, global, persistent, taskable infrared surveillance capabilities to the warfighter, nation and our allies for years to come.”

    The SBIRS team is led by the Infrared Space Systems Directorate at the U.S. Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center. Lockheed Martin is the SBIRS prime contractor, with Northrop Grumman as the payload integrator. Air Force Space Command operates the SBIRS system.

    “The launch of SBIRS GEO-1 heralds a new era for missile warning and other missions enabled by overhead persistent infrared sensors,” said Steve Toner, Northrop Grumman’s vice president of OPIR and Azusa Programs. “We can’t wait to turn it on. These sensors are highly capable, and we know that they will be of great value to our war fighters, our nation, and our allies.”

    Lockheed Martin's original SBIRS contract includes HEO payloads, two geosynchronous orbit (GEO) satellites, as well as ground-based assets to receive and process the infrared data. The team is also under a follow-on production contract to deliver additional HEO payloads and the third and fourth GEO satellites, and associated ground modifications.


    SBIRS GEO-1 Launch
    [​IMG]


    Source: Lockheed Martin
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2011
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  3. Someoneforyou

    Someoneforyou Regular Member

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    Video: Succesful Launch of Space Based Infrared System (SBIRS) geosynchronous (GEO-1) spacecraft on 7th may 2011. SBIRS GEO-1 is the most technologically advanced military infrared satellite ever developed and will deliver vastly improved missile warning capabilities for the nation while simultaneously improving the Nation’s missile defense, technical intelligence and battlespace awareness mission areas.

     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 10, 2015
  4. Someoneforyou

    Someoneforyou Regular Member

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    Pratt & Whitney Boosts Early-Warning Missile Detection System into Orbit
    UNITED STATES - 9 MAY 2011

    West Palm Beach, Fla. - Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne today demonstrated its ongoing commitment to national defense by boosting into orbit the U.S. military's first Space Based Infrared System Geosynchronous satellite (SBIRS GEO 1) for early-warning missile detection. The mission was launched from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida by a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket. The Atlas V is powered by the RD AMROSS RD-180 booster engine, and the Centaur upper stage is powered by the Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne RL10 engine. Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne is a United Technologies Corp. (NYSE: UTX) company. RD AMROSS LLC is a joint venture of Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne and NPO Energomash

    "Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne's commitment to 100 percent mission success was again demonstrated by the steadfast performance of the RL10 engine, which provided the upper-stage propulsion to boost this national security asset into space right on target," said Jim Maus, director, expendable propulsion programs, Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne.

    "The RD-180 engine performed exactly as expected, boosting the launch vehicle on the proper trajectory for this important mission," said Tom Wonnell, president and CEO of RD AMROSS. "We congratulate United Launch Alliance on another successful launch."

    SBIRS, considered one of the nation's highest priority space programs, is designed to provide global surveillance for early-detection missile warnings, missile defense and technical intelligence.

    The Atlas V Centaur upper stage is powered by a single RL10A4-2 engine that delivers 22,300 pounds of thrust. The Atlas V Common Core booster is powered by the RD-180 engine and delivers nearly 1 million pounds of thrust. The RD-180 is the only liquid oxygen-kerosene fueled engine with an oxygen-rich staged-combustion cycle flying in the United States today.

    Source : Pratt & Whitney, A United Technologies Company
     
  5. utubekhiladi

    utubekhiladi The Preacher Elite Member

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    do we have the capacity/knowledge to develop such system?
     
  6. Someoneforyou

    Someoneforyou Regular Member

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    United Launch Alliance Marks 50th Successful Launch by Delivering the Space-Based Infrared System (SBIRS) Satellite to Orbit for the U.S. Air Force
    UNITED STATES - 7 MAY 2011

    CAPE CANAVERAL AFS, Fla. --- A United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket carrying the Space-Based Infrared System (SBIRS) satellite for the United States Air Force lifted off from Space Launch Complex-41 here at 2:10 p.m. EDT today. This marks the 50th successful launch for ULA since the company was formed in December 2006.

    "With this launch, ULA continues to demonstrate its commitment to 100 percent mission success," said Michael Gass, ULA President and CEO. "This milestone is a testament to the dedicated employees that for every mission deliver excellence, best value and continuous improvement to our customers."

    This mission was launched aboard an Atlas V 401 vehicle configuration, which includes a 4-meter diameter payload fairing. The booster for this mission was powered by the RD AMROSS RD-180 engine and the Centaur upper stage was powered by a single Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne RL-10A engine.

    "This is a very important day for our customers and for our nation," said Jim Sponnick, ULA vice president, Mission Operations. "The ULA team is extremely proud to have served with this strong government and industry team in successfully launching the SBIRS GEO-1 satellite on its critical mission."

    SBIRS is a consolidated system intended to meet United States infrared space surveillance needs for decades to come. The SBIRS program addresses critical warfighter needs in the areas of missile warning, missile defense and battlespace characterization.

    ULA's next launch is the Delta II Aquarius mission currently scheduled for June 9, 2011 from Space Launch Complex-3 at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif.



    Source: United Launch Alliance
     
  7. Someoneforyou

    Someoneforyou Regular Member

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    Next Generation Missile Warning Satellite Successfully Reaches Orbit

    Next Generation Missile Warning Satellite Successfully Reaches Orbit
    UNITED STATES - 24 MAY 2011

    SBIRS GEO-1 Spacecraft to Deliver Unprecedented Infrared Surveillance for the Nation

    DENVER, May 24th, 2011 -- The first Lockheed Martin-built Space Based Infrared System (SBIRS) geosynchronous (GEO-1) spacecraft has successfully reached its intended orbit and is performing as required following its successful May 7 launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla.

    After launch, the U.S. Air Force/Lockheed Martin SBIRS ground team executed a series of six Liquid Apogee Engine (LAE) burns to propel the spacecraft to its geosynchronous orbital slot. The team then deployed the satellite's solar arrays, light shade and antenna wing assemblies in preparation for activating its sophisticated infrared sensors and the start of early orbit testing.

    SBIRS GEO-1 is the most technologically advanced military infrared satellite ever developed and will enhance early warning of missile launches around the globe, support the nation's ballistic missile defense system, greatly expand technical intelligence gathering capability, and bolster situational awareness for warfighters on the battlefield.

    “Successfully reaching orbit and conducting deployments is a tremendous milestone for the SBIRS GEO-1 spacecraft. Thanks to a very talented and dedicated team, this first-of-its-kind spacecraft has performed flawlessly,” said Brig Gen (select) Roger W. Teague, the director of the U.S. Air Force’s Infrared Space Systems Directorate. “We anticipate continued success as we progress towards payload activation in the near future.”

    SBIRS GEO-1 includes highly sophisticated scanning and staring sensors that will deliver improved infrared sensitivity and a reduction in area revisit times over the current constellation. The scanning sensor will provide a wide area surveillance of missile launches and natural phenomena across the earth, while the staring sensor will be used to observe smaller areas of interest with superior sensitivity.

    “We are very pleased with the performance of SBIRS GEO-1 and we are looking forward to delivering unprecedented infrared surveillance capabilities for the nation,” said Jeff Smith, vice president of Lockheed Martin’s Overhead Persistent Infrared (OPIR) mission area.

    The SBIRS team is led by the Infrared Space Systems Directorate at the U.S. Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center. Lockheed Martin is the SBIRS prime contractor, with Northrop Grumman as the payload integrator. Air Force Space Command operates the SBIRS system.

    Lockheed Martin's original SBIRS contract includes HEO payloads, two geosynchronous orbit (GEO) satellites, as well as ground-based assets to receive and process the infrared data. The team is also under a follow-on production contract to deliver additional HEO payloads and the third and fourth GEO satellites, and associated ground modifications.


    [​IMG]


    Source: Lockheed Martin
     
  8. Someoneforyou

    Someoneforyou Regular Member

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    Nation’s New Missile Warning Satellite Delivers First Infrared Imagery
    UNITED STATES - 7 JULY 2011

    SBIRS GEO-1 Satellite to Provide a Quantum Leap in Infrared Surveillance Capabilities

    DENVER, July 7th, 2011 -- The first Lockheed Martin [NYSE: LMT]-built Space Based Infrared System (SBIRS) geosynchronous (GEO-1) spacecraft beamed down its first infrared image on June 21 to the SBIRS ground station. Following its May 7 launch, the satellite is performing as expected, and is now undergoing early orbit testing.

    The U.S. Air Force’s SBIRS GEO-1 spacecraft is the most technologically advanced military infrared satellite ever developed. The system will enhance the military’s ability to detect missile launches around the globe, support the nation's ballistic missile defense system, greatly expand technical intelligence gathering capability, and bolster situational awareness for warfighters on the battlefield.

    The satellite includes highly sophisticated scanning and staring sensors that deliver improved infrared sensitivity and a reduction in area revisit times over the current constellation. The scanning sensor will provide a wide area surveillance of missile launches and natural phenomena across the earth, while the staring sensor will be used to observe smaller areas of interest with superior sensitivity.

    “We are tremendously proud of Team SBIRS for their superb efforts to initialize the Air Force’s newest, most capable infrared payload,” said Col. Mike Noble, Deputy Director of the U.S. Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center’s Infrared Space Systems Directorate. “This is another important milestone for the SBIRS’ Air Force and industry team. Successful payload activation is a major step toward fielding the all-new GEO capabilities for the nation and joint warfighters.”

    After launch, the U.S. Air Force/Lockheed Martin SBIRS ground team executed a series of six Liquid Apogee Engine (LAE) burns to propel the spacecraft to its geosynchronous orbital slot. The team then deployed the satellite's solar arrays, light shade and antenna wing assemblies. Most recently, the team opened the satellite’s payload doors and activated its sophisticated infrared sensors to begin the start of early orbit calibration and testing.

    “SBIRS GEO-1 is performing flawlessly thus far, and the first image sent from the satellite is outstanding,” said Jeff Smith, vice president of Lockheed Martin’s Overhead Persistent Infrared (OPIR) mission area. “We are focused on executing an efficient and thorough checkout of the spacecraft and ultimately delivering unprecedented infrared surveillance capabilities to our nation.”

    The SBIRS team is led by the Infrared Space Systems Directorate at the U.S. Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center. Lockheed Martin is the SBIRS prime contractor, with Northrop Grumman as the payload integrator. Air Force Space Command operates the SBIRS system.

    Lockheed Martin's original SBIRS contract includes HEO payloads, two geosynchronous orbit (GEO) satellites, as well as ground-based assets to receive and process the infrared data. The team is also under a follow-on production contract to deliver additional HEO payloads and the third and fourth GEO satellites, and associated ground modifications.



    Source: Lockheed Martin
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2011
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  9. Someoneforyou

    Someoneforyou Regular Member

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    U.S Air Force’s Second Missile Warning Satellite (GEO-2) Completes Major Environmental Test at Lockheed Martin
    UNITED STATES - 16 AUGUST 2011

    SUNNYVALE, Calif., August 16th, 2011 -- Lockheed Martin [NYSE:LMT] has successfully completed acoustic testing of the second Space Based Infrared System (SBIRS) geosynchronous (GEO-2) spacecraft.

    The U.S. Air Force’s SBIRS satellites provide the nation with significantly improved missile warning capabilities and simultaneously support other critical missions including missile defense, technical intelligence and battlespace awareness.

    During acoustic testing, the fully integrated GEO-2 spacecraft was paced through the maximum sound and vibration levels expected during launch into orbit. Acoustic and pyroshock testing are among several critical environmental test phases that validate the overall satellite design, quality of workmanship and survivability during space vehicle launching and on-orbit operations. GEO-2 will now undergo thermal vacuum testing, which will validate its performance at temperature extremes greater than those expected during on-orbit operations.

    “SBIRS GEO-2 is progressing very smoothly on the path to delivery, and successful acoustic testing of the space vehicle is indicative of the team’s increasing expertise in fielding SBIRS spacecraft,” said Col Scott Larrimore, Chief of the U.S. Air Force’s SBIRS Space Division. “Our dedicated government and industry SBIRS team is focused on executing an efficient and thorough environmental test phase and ultimately delivering the much needed capabilities SBIRS GEO-2 will bring to our warfighter.”

    The first geosynchronous (GEO-1) SBIRS satellite was launched May 7, and has since reached orbit, deployed its instruments and activated its sophisticated infrared sensors. GEO-1 is performing as expected, and is now undergoing early orbit testing. GEO-2 is on track to be delivered and available for launch in spring 2012.

    "Leveraging expertise gained from GEO-1, our SBIRS team executed a very smooth acoustic testing phase on GEO-2,” said Dave Sheridan, Lockheed Martin's SBIRS deputy program director. “We understand the importance of the SBIRS system and are committed to delivering GEO-2 efficiently and affordably for our customer.”

    The SBIRS team is led by the Infrared Space Systems Directorate at the U.S. Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center. Lockheed Martin is the SBIRS prime contractor, with Northrop Grumman as the payload integrator. Air Force Space Command operates the SBIRS system.

    Lockheed Martin's original SBIRS contract includes HEO payloads, two geosynchronous orbit (GEO) satellites, as well as ground-based assets to receive and process the infrared data. The team is also under a follow-on production contract to deliver additional HEO payloads and the third and fourth GEO satellites, and associated ground modifications.



    Source: Lockheed Martin
     

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