U.S. Air Force F-22 Raptor successfully flown on synthetic biofuel

Discussion in 'Americas' started by Someoneforyou, Mar 22, 2011.

  1. Someoneforyou

    Someoneforyou Regular Member

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    UNITED STATES - 18 MARCH 2011

    EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. -- An F-22 Raptor successfully flew at supercruise March 18 on a 50/50 fuel blend of conventional petroleum-based JP-8 and biofuel derived from camelina, a weed-like plant not used for food.

    The flight was the capstone of a series of ground and flight test events conducted by the 411th Flight Test Squadron at Edwards Air Force Base the week of March 14 for the Raptor using the biofuel blend. The Air Force selected the F-22 weapon system to be the biofuel blend flight test pathfinder for all fighter aircraft.

    The overall test objective was to evaluate biofuel fuel blend suitability in the F-22 weapon system. Testing consisted of air starts, operability, and performance at different speeds and altitude throughout the flight envelope. The F-22 Raptor performed several maneuvers including a supercruise at 40,000 ft. reaching speeds of 1.5 Mach. Supercruise is supersonic flight without using the engine's afterburner.

    "The F-22 flew on Friday, March 18 and performed flawlessly on the biofuel blend citing no noticeable differences from traditional JP-8," said Jeff Braun, director of the Alternative Fuels Certification Division, part of the Aeronautical Systems Center at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio.

    The overall flight was a success and another milestone completed for the Alternative Fuels Certification Division in support the Air Force's 2016 acquisition goal to cost-competitively acquire 50 percent of the domestic aviation fuel requirement via alternative fuel blends in which the component is derived from domestic sources produced in a manner that is 'greener' than fuels produced from conventional petroleum.

    The camelina-derived synthetic fuel falls into a class of hydro-processed blended biofuels known as hydrotreated renewable jet fuels, or "HRJs." The HRJ fuel can be derived from a variety of plant oil and animal fat feedstocks.

    Air Force officials in February certified the entire C-17 Globemaster III fleet for unrestricted flight operations using the HRJ biofuel blend.


    An F-22 Raptor takes off at Edwards powered by biofuel March 18. The flight was the capstone of a series of ground and flight test events conducted by the 411th Flight Test Squadron this past week for the Raptor using the biofuel blend.
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  3. Someoneforyou

    Someoneforyou Regular Member

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    Camelina-Based Biofuel Breaks Sound Barrier on U.S. Air Force F-22 Raptor Test Flight
    UNITED STATES - 21 MARCH 2011

    BOZEMAN, Mont. --- Sustainable Oils, a producer of renewable, low carbon and domestically made fuels, announced jet fuel derived from its camelina powered the successful test flight of a U.S. Air Force F-22 Raptor aircraft. The aircraft was powered by a 50/50 fuel blend of conventional petroleum-based JP-8 and biofuel derived from camelina.

    "The F-22 flew on Friday, March 18 and performed flawlessly on the biofuel blend citing no noticeable differences from traditional JP-8," said Jeff Braun, director of the Alternative Fuels Certification Division, part of the Aeronautical Systems Center at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio.

    According to the Air Force, the flight test “consisted of air starts, operability, and performance at different speeds and altitude throughout the flight envelope. The F-22 Raptor performed several maneuvers including a supercruise at 40,000 ft. reaching speeds of 1.5 Mach. Supercruise is supersonic flight without using the engine's afterburner.”

    To date, Sustainable Oils has contracted for more than 500,000 gallons of camelina-based biofuel with the U.S. Air Force, Navy, and Army. Fuels derived from camelina have been the most thoroughly tested of all aviation biofuels. They have successfully powered a variety of aircraft, including commercial airlines (Continental, Japan Airlines, KLM) and multiple military aircraft (A-10 Warthog, FA-18 Hornet, and MH-60S Seahawk Helicopter).

    “Camelina-based jet fuel is ready for liftoff,” said Scott Johnson, President of Sustainable Oils. “As this most recent test demonstrates, it needs no additional research, development or technology. It actually adds to the food chain, and dramatically reduces the carbon footprint of the fuel.”

    Although it is a plant, camelina does not compete with crops grown for food. Rather, it grows well in rotation with wheat and on non-irrigated land. Given its high protein content and Omega 3 fatty acids, its “meal” (what is left after oil extraction from the seed) has been approved by the USDA for livestock and poultry feed, thus adding to the food chain.

    A Michigan Tech University life cycle analysis (LCA) of camelina jet fuel showed that it reduces carbon emissions by 75 percent compared to petroleum jet fuel.


    Sustainable Oils, LLC is a producer and marketer of renewable, environmentally clean, and high-value camelina-based renewable fuels. Sustainable Oils is focused on the continued research and development of dedicated energy crops such as camelina. Sustainable Oils solidly supports both agricultural and green energy initiatives with camelina, which is efficiently and economically grown in rotation with wheat and even on marginal lands, harvested with traditional equipment, and requires minimal water.


    Source: Sustainable Oils, LLC
     
  4. Someoneforyou

    Someoneforyou Regular Member

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    Pratt & Whitney's F119 Engine Hot Section Demonstrates Full-Life Capability

    EAST HARTFORD, Conn. | Pratt & Whitney’s F119 engine powering the U.S. Air Force’s F-22 Raptor, successfully reached its first hot section full-life capability of 4,325 total accumulated cycles (TACs), during a recent mission at Langley Air Force Base in Virginia. This achievement was made possible through an accelerated engine maturity program, using engines that “lead the fleet” to demonstrate full-life capability of F119 production engines. Pratt & Whitney is a United Technologies Corp. company.

    “We are delighted with the exceptional performance of the F119, and are proud to partner with our U.S. Air Force customer on this important program,” said Bennett Croswell, vice president, F135/F119 Engine Programs, Pratt & Whitney. “Being able to conduct a full-life overhaul, years ahead of the remainder of the operational fleet, provides valuable insight and confidence on this fifth-generation engine, as well as the F135 engine, powering the F-35 Lightning II today.”

    The accelerated maturity program for the F119 engine, called “Compass Vector”, is a partnership between Pratt & Whitney and the U.S. Air Force. These “lead the fleet” engines fly approximately two times the normal fly rate at operational bases in various environmental conditions. The advanced data collection from this program identifies sustainment opportunities aimed at maximizing readiness within the life cycle cost expectations for the entire F119 powered F-22 fleet.

    Pratt & Whitney continues to deliver both F119 and F135 engines from the fifth generation production line, with approximately 360 F119 engines and 18 F135 production engines delivered to date. The F135 is the only engine powering the F-35 Lightning II flight test program today with more than 740 flights, 1,200 flight hours and 64 flawless vertical landings. The F119 and the F135 are the only two fifth generation afterburner fighter engines in production today.


    File Photo: F119 engine
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    Source: Pratt & Whitney
     
  5. Someoneforyou

    Someoneforyou Regular Member

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    Elmendorf Airmen deploy to Kadena, test capabilities
    UNITED STATES - 21 APRIL 2011

    KADENA U.S. AIR FORCE BASE -- A group of pilots and maintainers from the 525th Expeditionary Fighter Squadron at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, deployed here earlier in 2011, along with their F-22 Raptors, to test their capabilities in a new environment, setting records in the process.

    During their stay here, they reached unprecedented heights for a single fighter squadron, all while adapting from the climate of Alaska to the tropical environment of Okinawa.

    "It's all about showcasing the capabilities of Pacific Air Forces," said Capt. Devin Hartman, the 525th Aircraft Maintenance Unit officer in charge. "Our mission is to employ the F-22s and train in a different setting, all the while adding to the Pacific presence. Just being on Okinawa helps both maintenance and operations personnel, because of the unique challenges the environment presents."

    Members of the 525th EFS flew 30 sorties, or complete flight cycles, in a single day.

    They said this is an achievement unreached by other fighter squadrons in the Air Force.

    "The fact that we could pull off such a feat is a big deal, because no other single fighter squadron has ever done it," Captain Hartman said. "We've surpassed what people are used to, and performing how we have really makes an impression on a lot of people."

    While on Okinawa, Airmen from the 525th EFS have worked with Kadena's Airmen and aircraft, as well as with Marines and their aircraft from Marine Corps bases on-island.

    "We have F-22s, F-15s, (E-3 Sentries) and other aircraft that in a contingency would be fighting together, and by them coming down here, it's a chance for us all to train together as well," said Col. David Nahom, the 18th Operations Group commander. "Any (time) you get a fifth-generation aircraft like the F-22 training alongside the other fourth-generation aircraft, like the F-15, as well as our AWACS controllers and our Marine partners that are always here, it's a good thing."

    Colonel Nahom said that by the 525th EFS Airmen coming to Kadena AB, Airmen from the 18th Wing have developed a better relationship with their PACAF sister base.

    "The Airmen who have been training alongside the F-22 crews have done a fantastic job," Colonel Nahom said. "We are an expeditionary Air Force, and very often we like to pick up other units and move them around, not only for the training value of it, but for the security it brings by showcasing the ability to move assets around. Having the Raptors here is part of the theater security package, but the added benefit of the training is fantastic. I think we showed that we can move forces around the Pacific theater, even given the vast distances between the bases.

    "Having the F-22s in town to fight and train with us has been a fantastic opportunity, and I hope it presents itself again soon," he added.


    A crew chief signals the pilot of an F-22 Raptor to prepare to taxi March 31, 2011, on the flightline at Kadena Air Base, Japan. The Airmen, along with the F-22s, are assigned to the 525th Expeditionary Fighter Squadron at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska. They deployed to Kadena AB earlier in 2011 to test their capabilities in a new environment and to train with Airmen and aircraft there.
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