Turkmenistan, Afghanistan, Pakistan and India Establish Landmark TAPI

Discussion in 'Subcontinent & Central Asia' started by Yusuf, Nov 15, 2014.

  1. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    MANILA, PHILIPPINES — The four state gas companies of Turkmenistan, Afghanistan, Pakistan, and India have established a company that will build, own and operate the planned 1,800-kilometer Turkmenistan-Afghanistan-Pakistan-India (TAPI) natural gas pipeline. State Concern “Turkmengas”, Afghan Gas Enterprise, Inter State Gas Systems (Private) Limited, and GAIL (India) Limited own equal shares of the company.

    “Establishment of the TAPI pipeline company is a key milestone in the development of the pipeline. It is a tangible sign of transformational cooperation among the parties that presages the enhanced energy security, business prospects, and overall peace and stability in the region promised by the pipeline,” said Klaus Gerhaeusser, Director General of ADB’s Central and West Asia Department.

    ADB was appointed the transaction advisor for the TAPI gas pipeline project in November 2013. In that role, ADB advised on the establishment of the TAPI pipeline company as an integral part of the larger goal of identifying and selecting a commercial consortium leader to spearhead the construction and operation of the pipeline. When selected, the commercial consortium leader will take a substantial stake in the company.

    The TAPI pipeline will export up to 33 billion cubic meters of natural gas a year from Turkmenistan to Afghanistan, Pakistan, and India over 30 years. Turkmenistan has the world’s fourth-largest proven gas reserves, and the pipeline will allow the landlocked country to diversify its gas export markets to the southeast. Turkmen gas in turn will provide a key new source of fuel for southern Afghanistan, Pakistan, and northern India.

    ADB, based in Manila, is dedicated to reducing poverty in Asia and the Pacific through inclusive economic growth, environmentally sustainable growth, and regional integration. Established in 1966, it is owned by 67 members—48 from the region. In 2013, ADB assistance totaled $21.0 billion, including cofinancing of $6.6 billion.

    Turkmenistan, Afghanistan, Pakistan and India Establish Landmark TAPI Pipeline Company | Asian Development Bank
     
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  3. Zebra

    Zebra Senior Member Senior Member

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    Re: Turkmenistan, Afghanistan, Pakistan and India Establish Landmark T

    Company incorporated for TAPI gas pipeline - Oil & Gas Journal

    HOUSTON, Nov. 14
    By OGJ editors

     
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  4. Srinivas_K

    Srinivas_K Senior Member Senior Member

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    Re: Turkmenistan, Afghanistan, Pakistan and India Establish Landmark T

    Nice initiative !!
     
  5. jus

    jus Senior Member Senior Member

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    Re: Turkmenistan, Afghanistan, Pakistan and India Establish Landmark T

    What a waste those countries not gonna civilize ,why India wasting money on pipe lines where as US becoming self reliant on OIL :rofl:



    [​IMG]

    No signs U.S. shale gas production will slow, Bentek says - UPI.com

    and India shale gas

    Companies including Reliance Industries Limited (E&P), RNRL, Vikas WSP Limited have expressed interest in exploring in India, which is estimated to hold 500 to 2000 trillion cubic meter of recoverable shale gas [31][citation needed]. Reliance Industries paid a reported US$1.7 billion for a 40% share in Atlas Energy's leasehold in the Marcellus shale gas play in the eastern US.[32] A complication to shale gas in India is that the government-issued leases for conventional petroleum exploration do not include unconventional sources such as shale gas.[33]
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2014
  6. Srinivas_K

    Srinivas_K Senior Member Senior Member

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    Re: Turkmenistan, Afghanistan, Pakistan and India Establish Landmark T

    The initiatives needs to be started on all directions.

    Transport of oil or gas through shipping is costlier than pipe line !!

     
  7. jus

    jus Senior Member Senior Member

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    Re: Turkmenistan, Afghanistan, Pakistan and India Establish Landmark T

    I want to explore India's shale gas reserves not shipment from US
     
  8. Srinivas_K

    Srinivas_K Senior Member Senior Member

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    Re: Turkmenistan, Afghanistan, Pakistan and India Establish Landmark T

    The technology still needs to be developed. It is not easy to extract the gas from Shale reserves, cost factor and pollution are also some factors that needs to be considered !!
     
  9. jus

    jus Senior Member Senior Member

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    Re: Turkmenistan, Afghanistan, Pakistan and India Establish Landmark T

    I agree completely but see those countries Afg/Pak they are nowhere will be civilized.So better invest in tech. which US already using&producing than waste ppl
     
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  10. Srinivas_K

    Srinivas_K Senior Member Senior Member

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    Re: Turkmenistan, Afghanistan, Pakistan and India Establish Landmark T

    This pipe line will augment the already existing delivery mechanism.

    I think the details will be known about this project soon!
     
  11. jus

    jus Senior Member Senior Member

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    Re: Turkmenistan, Afghanistan, Pakistan and India Establish Landmark T

    TAPI in pipe line from past 10yrs,it is not gonna materialize.So better Invest in SOLAR,WIND,NUCLEAR,Coal bed methane,SHALE gas........... for self reliant
     
  12. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    Re: Turkmenistan, Afghanistan, Pakistan and India Establish Landmark T

    TAPI gas pipeline project to be launched

    The construction of a gas pipeline from Turkmenistan to India through Afghanistan and Pakistan will be one of the key topics of the international conference in Ashkhabad. All four working groups, which were set up by the four countries to implement the project, will discuss the readiness to launch it at their two-day meeting that will start on Tuesday.

    A few days ago, India’s GAIL together with Turkmenistan’s state-run Turkmengaz, Afghanistan’s Afghan Gas and Pakistan’s Inter State Gas Systems (Private) Limited set up an operation company that will be engaged in the implementation of the project on the basis of equal equity participation. This was stated by the Asian Development Bank, the transactional adviser to the project.

    Turkmenistan appealed its partners to finish all formalities at the earliest so as to start the construction of the pipeline next year. The pipeline is 1,735 kilometers long, while the project is estimated at $7.9 billion. Russia supports it, and at present, its involvement is being determined, says president of the Union of Oil and Gas Producers of Russia Gennady Shmal.

    “Any such project is interesting for all companies working in this sphere. This is a mega-project that can be compared with the Power of Siberia gas pipeline designed to supply gas to China. Consequently, participation in the project is very important, moreover, it gives access to energy assets. We can offer our technology to develop gas deposits. To this end, we have sufficient possibilities, experience and Russian-made equipment. Consequently, I believe that TAPI project is interesting for Russia’s state-run gas monopoly, Gazprom. It will be excellent if the company can join the consortium that will construct the pipeline sooner or later,” Shmal said.

    According to observers, the conference in Ashkhabad will help Gazprom to establish contacts with the TAPI operation company.

    India, in its search for additional energy sources and the diversification of its imports, has turned to the north. First and foremost, it has drawn attention to Russia’s resource potential and advantages in cooperation with Russia. In view of this, it is not excluded that India and Russia will declare the creation of a new “project of the century” during the visit to India of Russian President Vladimir Putin in the first half of December. This will be similar to the Russian-Chinese gas pipeline, the “Power of Siberia”. This concerns the construction of a pipe branch from the Russian-Chinese gas pipeline. India’s initiative was supported by Russia at the highest political level, and at present, it is being studied by technical experts.

    This is a complicated project not only from the technological point of view, says Gennady Shmal.

    “It is problem when taking into account mutual relations between China and India. This will not be a simple task. China’s demand for gas is very high. China plans to increase gas imports from Turkmenistan. Even Russia’s gas pipeline will hardly satisfy China’s growing demands. Consequently, I do not think China will give the green light to the project,” Shmal said.

    Anyway, Russia’s resource potential will help to withdraw the problem of competition between the two partners if it is linked only to gas.

    In fact, Indian companies have been invited to become shareholders of two Russian projects. This concerns the development of gas and its liquefying, “Yamal-LNG” project in Yakutia and the development of the Vankor oil and gas-condensate field in the Krasnoyarsk region
    . Russia has also invited Chinese companies to join the projects, and unlike, the Indian companies they have already agreed to participate in them. Experts say that India’s final decision will be declared during the talks between Vladimir Putin and Narendra Modi in New Delhi in December.


    World, Russia, south asia, Economy




    Read more: TAPI gas pipeline project to be launched - News - Economy - Russian Radio
     
  13. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    Can Modi Visit Move TAPI Forward?

    A visit to Turkmenistan this week is an opportunity to jump-start the flagging project.

    As Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi swings through Central Asia over the next week, his docket looks to be full. As Catherine Putz detailed, Modi’s focus will range from security concerns to regional projects, from ISIS to investment to improving relations between New Delhi and all the Central Asian states.

    And while there’s plenty on Modi’s plate, it’s worth highlighting one project that help encapsulates India’s sputtering relationship with the region. The Diplomat has already covered the issues besetting the Turkmenistan-Afghanistan-Pakistan-India (TAPI) pipeline, but given Modi’s visit, they are worth looking at once more. The $10 billion, 1,078-mile planned pipeline, set to transit Turkmen gas to customers in the three southern states, has long stood as something of an idealized project – fantastic on paper, but with little traction on the ground. While Turkmenistan needs to diversify its gas exports away from Beijing, and while Afghanistan-Pakistan-India all require Turkmen gas for economic expansion, the project hasn’t congealed in a way any of them want. Turkmenistan remains wary of allowing a foreign major to access its infrastructure. India and Pakistan have their own tensions that barely require detailing. And Afghanistan’s security – especially as it pertains to an above-ground pipeline – remains, at best, questionable. The Chinese factor also plays a role, with Beijing unwilling to see its client-state in Ashgabat casting about for other patrons, while Iran may soon prevent an alternate route for Turkmenistan to shuttle its gas.

    TAPI would seem to have far more going against it than pushing in its favor. Hence, why Afghan President Ashraf Ghani recently observed that TAPI’s completion date – originally set for 2018 – would now be 2020. Even that, given TAPI’s recent track record, may seem optimistic.

    As such, Modi’s visit to Turkmenistan this week may serve as one of the best opportunities to jump-start the flagging project. According to The Hindu, Turkmen officials are looking forward to speaking with Modi about TAPI’s prospects. Indeed, officials are so eager that Turkmenistan ambassador Parakhat Durdyev apparently ruled out any further delays due to security concerns. “There should be no excuses,” Durdyev recently said. “Afghanistan is getting more and more involved, Pakistan has no reasons to create problems.” According to the report, Durdyev added that “all the beneficiary countries are on the same page pushing for early implementation of the project.”

    Whether Durdyev’s comments stem from frustration or excitement is difficult to discern. Regardless, his comments that the project can’t, or won’t, be delayed due to security concerns isn’t a pledge he can make, especially considering all the security issues recently flaring on the Turkmen-Afghan border. Likewise, an “early implementation” for TAPI remains far more a wish than a reality.

    If nothing else, though, Durdyev’s comments may help point to renewed focus on the Turkmen side to actually push the project toward breaking ground. The outcome of Modi’s visit remains to be seen. But maybe – maybe – TAPI may finally see the kick it needs, from officials at both ends of the pipeline.

    http://thediplomat.com/2015/07/can-modi-visit-move-tapi-forward/
     
  14. amoy

    amoy Senior Member Senior Member

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    Turkmenistan Gears Up to Break Ground on TAPI
    http://thediplomat.com/2015/12/turkmenistan-gears-up-to-break-ground-on-tapi/

    On Sunday, December 13, Turkmenistan is scheduled to break ground on the much-discussed Turkmenistan-Afghanistan-Pakistan-India (TAPI) pipeline. The 1,735-kilometer pipeline is supposed to eventually carry 33 billion cubic meters of gas per year to South Asia from Turkmenistan. Price estimates range as high as $10 billion and the latest date for completion is an optimistic 2018. But as the groundbreaking approaches, it’s prudent to discuss how TAPI is the lightest form of economic diversification and how security, often mentioned but not always explained, is the greatest threat to the project’s completion.

    First, let’s discuss diversification. Turkmenistan’s economy is entirely wrapped up in the energy trade, mostly in selling natural gas to China. Diversification is a necessity to mitigate the risks associated with being entirely dependent not just on one trade but one buyer. Of course, TAPI is one kind of diversification. Expanding Turkmenistan’s pool of customers is a good thing, but of limited utility give the dip in hydrocarbon prices and the expectation that lower prices will persist. Turkmenistan may pipe more natural gas to more countries but it won’t be making much more money.

    Deeper diversification of the Turkmen economy is needed. There have been semi-steps — such as projects to convert natural gas into high-tech goods like plastics. The Japanese have stepped in as a partner on some such projects, as have the Turks. But even here, the investment climate is poor precisely because Turkmenistan is essentially a closed state. Turkmenistan assumed the role of consortium leader (taking a 51 percent stake) for the TAPI project, after several Western firms withdrew interest on the grounds that Ashgabat would not allow them an equity stake in the project. Turkmenistan’s reluctance to grant foreign firms such stakes in its fields has precluded their investment in the country. As Micha’el Tanchum wrote recently for The Diplomat, current talk points to the Dubai-based oil and gas company Dragon Oil as being close to finalizing its investment in the TAPI project.

    But even if the consortium can be filled out and partners founded, regional security concerns could endlessly delay and derail the completion of the project. Often (and I am also a culprit of this) we tend to mention security as a risk and move on, as if it is a minor concern. Even when security is characterized as a major concern, it’s not worth explaining. But let’s pause and parse through the pipeline’s route more deeply to see why security is the overarching problem with TAPI (referred to by the U.S. Energy Information Administration as the Trans-Afghanistan pipeline in the map below).

    [​IMG]
    Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, IHS Edin
    Representation of international boundaries and names is not necessarily authoritative.

    The gas for the pipeline is to be sourced from the massive Galkynysh field in southeastern Turkmenistan. The pipeline is to run across the border into Afghanistan’s Herat province, and then traverse southeast through Farah and Helmand provinces following the Herat-Kandahar highway and enter Kandahar province. At the Pakistani border, the pipeline will enter Balochistan near the provincial capital of Quetta and route due east until it enters India and ends in the town of Fazilka. This route could shift, but there are only so many ways to get from Turkmenistan to India.

    Afghanistan poses the biggest, though not the only, security challenge. In Herat this week,TOLOnews reported that fighting between Taliban factions has driven people from their homes. In October, Taliban overran the district through which the Herat-Kandahar highway runs in Farah province (though the Afghan government denied it). Helmand has seen heavy fighting in the last year. In October, the Taliban put pressure on Lashkar Gah, the provincial capital (through which the highway runs), and today it was reported that the Taliban have seized control of Khan Neshin, in the province’s south. In Kandahar, the Taliban attacked the international airport on Tuesday, killing 37 people and injuring 35 more.

    This isn’t to say that over the life of the TAPI project, the security situation in Afghanistan won’t stabilize. But if recent history serves as a preview, there is little room to hope for vast improvements. The Afghans have reportedly said they’ll provide security for the pipeline, but all it takes is one successful explosion to damage completed sections worth millions. Attacks by the Taliban or other militants could harry the project for years, not to mention scare investors and workers away. At the very least, security will delay the project’s completion and drive up its price tag — at the worst, TAPI will be abandoned after billions in sunk costs.

    Turkmenistan’s President Gurbanguly Berdimuhamedov will host representatives from Afghanistan, Pakistan, and India for the groundbreaking this weekend. Afghan President Ashraf Ghani accepted an invitation to attend. There are sure to be smiles all around and talk of rosy futures. But the cynics among us won’t be holding our breath.

    ~~Still waters run deep. ~~from my MiPad using tapatalk
     
  15. Kshatriya87

    Kshatriya87 Senior Member Senior Member

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    http://www.dailypioneer.com/columnists/edit/boosting-energy-security.html

    Security concerns plague promising gas pipeline

    Two decades after it was first proposed, the Trans-Afghanistan Pipeline, commonly known as the Turkmenistan-Afghanistan-Pakistan-India pipeline, is finally underway. The pipeline should be operational by end 2018, although it will take another three to four years after that for the construction of the entire 1,800 km-long pipeline to be completed. Once the whole pipeline is in place, it will export up to 33 billion cubic meters of natural gas a year from Turkmenistan to Afghanistan, Pakistan and India over three decades.

    From an energy security point of view, the benefits of this project are obvious: Both India and Pakistan are energy-starved nations while Afghanistan's energy appetite will only grow as it progresses on the path of development and prosperity. Moreover, since natural gas is clean energy, TAPI will be helping with the efforts of all the three nations to grow and develop in a sustainable manner. From a financial standpoint, Afghanistan and Pakistan will be making a handsome amount of money in transit fees while the entire Turkmen economy stands to gain once the pipeline is operationalised. Turkmenistan has the world's fourth largest proven gas reserves and TAPI will allow it to diversify its export market, which is currently functioning below potential.

    Previously, Russia was one of Turkmenistan's biggest gas clients. However, since the imposition of Western sanctions, Russian gas purchases have plummeted and there has been much heartburn between Moscow and Ashgabat on the issue of gas prices. In this period, China has stepped in, but the Turkmen don’t want to be become too dependent on Beijing. In terms of geo-politics, TAPI can galvanise regional diplomacy between South and Central. Apart from adding a new element to bilateral ties, it will also spur ongoing efforts to set up roadways and rail lines between India and Central Asia. This in turn will deepen economic cooperation, lead to greater regional integration and, for India in particular, offer an opportunity to emerge as a major player in Eurasia.

    But let us not forget that there is a reason why TAPI hasn't taken off in two decades — the pipeline runs through some of the most dangerous parts of the world including Taliban-strongholds in Afghanistan and an insurgency-infested Balochistan — and its physical security remains a matter of concern. Even in a best case scenario, hundreds of soldiers will have to be deployed to protect the pipeline. That the Pakistani Government is considering talking to the Taliban for security underlines the challenges at hand. Still, if the project is now making progress inspite of these concerns, it is because of changing geo-politics: For one, Turkmenistan's economic imperatives were accelerated after the Iranian nuclear deal which brought a new competitor to the gas market (India, for example, is now also looking at an India-Oman-Iran pipeline). Also, America now sees TAPI as a tool to undercut Russian and Chinese hegemony in the region.

     

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