Toy guns favourite item for children on Eid

Discussion in 'Pakistan' started by Blackwater, Aug 1, 2014.

  1. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    [​IMG]

    :sad::sad::sad::rofl::rofl::wave::wave:

    PESHAWAR/SWABI: Toy guns turned out to be the favourite thing for children to play with on Eid days.

    Shopkeepers reported high sales of the replicas of weapons and said children spent most eidee, the cash given by elders on the festival, to purchase them.

    According to them, the replica of SMG was the most favourite toy gun among children but its price was relatively high.

    They said the prices of pistols and rifles ranged between Rs30 and Rs2000 each.

    In a playful manner, children pressed triggers pointing barrel towards each other with its small size plastic bullets, while many preferred to shoot at targets.

    “We bring toy guns from the Pepal Mandi market to earn our livelihood,” said vendor Azma at Swati Phatak.

    He said sale of toy guns was not a crime as it was not harmful.

    He said wholesalers invested huge sums of money in the import of replicas of weapons from China on a large scale. A man said for the first time, he’d seen that one of his sons’ main demand on Eid was a toy gun.

    “I asked him to get permission from his mother, who didn’t give the permission and sent him back for decision,” he said.

    The man said the child was not willing to give in and forced him to buy him a water gun for fun.

    When contacted, Peshawar SSP (operations) Najeegur Rehman said there was no ban on use of toy guns but he personally felt their sale should be banned.

    “During my visits to different areas of Circular Road, Sarband and city area on Eid days, it was seen that majority of children had toy guns in their hands though they also had other toys,” he said.

    The SSP said use of fake guns by children to such an extent showed their inclination towards militarisation.

    “I will suggest ban on toy guns under Section 144 and even legislation against them,” he said.

    In Swabi, too, high sales of toy guns were reported on Eid days. Shopkeepers said they had bought toy guns in large numbers in view of their high demand. Both parents and shopkeepers said they could not stop children from purchasing toy guns. “My son cried so much that I had to buy him the replicas of a pistol. His friends already had it,” said Muazzam Khan.

    Mostly, the children asked for Kalashnikov, which sold for Rs500-Rs1500, and that was followed by pistols.

    Toy seller Sardar Khan said a good toy pistol was available for Rs500-Rs600.

    Ali Ghayas Khan of Maneri area said when he asked a trader about the possible harms of the sale of toy guns on the children’s personality, he turned angry and insisted he didn’t force children to buy toy guns.

    He demanded a ban on the sale of toy guns.

    Published in Dawn, August 1st, 2014

    The Express Tribune Blog - Latest Breaking Pakistan News, Business, Life, Style, Cricket, Videos, Comments
     
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  3. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    In Pakistan it is - You live by the Gun and you Die by the Gun

    The children are learning fast.
     
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  4. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    pakistani kids when young



    [​IMG]


    pakistani kids when mard-a- momen

    [​IMG]



    :p:p:p
     
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  5. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

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  6. ninja85

    ninja85 Regular Member

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    bahoot bahoot mubarak the upgrades,btw buying real ones would be much easy in pakibeggaristan than toys.:rofl::laugh::lol:
     
  7. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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    @Blackwater, toy guns were our favourites during Durga Puja. Those were not airsoft, but actually had small drops of explosive that would burst and make a noise. @Ray Sir, could you please post a picture, if you have one?

    During Kali Puja, it would be crackers, and bombs, until "noise pollution" laws began to be enforced.
     
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  8. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    I have my doubts if toy weapons are used in Pujas since all are worried about terrorists attacking crowded pandals.

    However, during Holi, there is no end of the toy squirting guns.
     
  9. maomao

    maomao Veteran Hunter of Maleecha Senior Member

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    Toy guns are always favorite for boy anywhere in the world! Better to have toy guns than the real ones. No need to blame Afghan brothers; to be honest gun culture is very common in AFG....if parents gift their kids a toy gun then it shows they understand the danger of real guns....I'm sure real guns are way cheaper than toys in AFG! :)
     
  10. Free Karma

    Free Karma Senior Member Senior Member

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    Saar, guns/weapons are always fun! Not to blame Pakistanis for this!
    Apart from guns I loved my bow and arrow set too :D

    Melee weapons were not so fun cause they broke all the time (sword and mace)

    Also we had roll cape guns, that were(are?) huuuuge favorite among kids.

    [​IMG]
     
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  11. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    true we use toy guns/cracker guns during diwali but out mind set is not to do jihad or liberate kashmir or liberate gaza.

    its about mindset, but pakis kids have this jihadi mindset
     
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  12. rock127

    rock127 Maulana Rockullah Senior Member

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    The thing is that Eid is celebrated for spreading Peace,Happiness and Love or "Pyar,Khushi and Bhaichara" and also doing charity.

    Diwali and Durga Puja is the win of Good over Evil which came through armed resistance and fight.The reason having a toy gun,bursting crackers,burning effigies sounds logical.

    I thought it was easy to see the difference. :dude:
     
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  13. rizwan78

    rizwan78 Regular Member

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    Does it mean , There is also thing like Jahad in hinduisem too ?
     
  14. rock127

    rock127 Maulana Rockullah Senior Member

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    What's Jahad???

    In Hinduism there is fight against evil just like in every religion but that doesn't mean converting and creating terror among masses.

    Now answer how Eid is related to buying guns.
     
  15. thethinker

    thethinker Senior Member Senior Member

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    Dear Rizwan,

    For your interest in Diwali and Durga Puja, here is the main differences between you guys and us :

    The toy guns for children here go back in cupboard once the festivals are over and they resume their schools and studies.

    These guns also stay in cupboard after reaching a certain age as we tend to graduate and look for non-violent work.
     
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  16. ladder

    ladder Senior Member Senior Member

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    Edit: Double post.
     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2014
  17. ladder

    ladder Senior Member Senior Member

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    Many of our religious book, contains war and Pujas/ festivals too revolve around the same theme. But when a child grows up he is able to differentiate between the book and real life and imbibes in him/her how to replicate the teachings of the book/ theme in modern times which essentially doesn't ask him/her to pick up weapon and strive for something using it.

    But, I am sorry that doesn't happen in a few madrassas in your country that indoctrinate children to walk the path for Jihad.

    Well, as written by here, by @pmaitra , the infatuation with guns for children itself is nothing wrong and in many cases harmless. But, if that infatuation is growing, the reason may hold the key whether the trend is anything good, neutral or bad.

    If it's due to a hit or popular movie, then no problem, but if he is picking up seeing family member, or from a society as a whole which glorifies guns or at least highlights it too much then it's problematic.

    And particularly for a country where guns are easily available, both legally and illegally.

    I though the OP article underlines that massage.
     
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  18. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    na bhai hume GAZA aur kashmir azad nahi karana:lol::lol:
     
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  19. rizwan78

    rizwan78 Regular Member

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    Could to please eleborate more on above mentioned bold part ? and how a child toy stands for a gun ?
     
  20. rizwan78

    rizwan78 Regular Member

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    I know sir , but you guys always think wrong about us , there is no gun culture in majurity part of pakistan, in my village only few peoples have guns but they have not kept these to kill some one, i have seen them only firing at marrages though. incese of FATA they have a long history of making guns at the time of english rule, they cannot even sleep without keeping a gun under there pillows, and for those who think that you will meat every pakistani hanging a gun on its shoulder here in pakistan are wrong, and as a father of a 4 year old kid i think a gun toy is as harmfull as a real gun, my junior starts to play Counter strike game when he was only 2 year old by watching me playing and he was master in aiming, firing and slections of guns within 3 months, i have uninstalled the game long time ago because he was always taling about that games and guns during studing & eating time , and still he replies her mother scolding with firing, making his two hands like a pistal tah tha tha :lol:
     
  21. thethinker

    thethinker Senior Member Senior Member

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    I suppose you then live in a different Pakistan, friend.

    For Middle-Class Pakistanis, a Gun Is a Must-Have Accessory

    "Guns have long been part of Pakistan's traditional culture, especially in the rugged northwestern part of the country. Handed down through generations, rifles have been used for hunting and for firing celebratory fusillades. Now, however, modern assault rifles and handguns have come into vogue among middle-class Pakistanis, and gun registration has jumped.

    This proliferation reflects many urbanites' dwindling faith that the country's new civilian government can protect them. Over the past year, Pakistan has endured the assassination of popular political leader Benazir Bhutto, a spreading Islamist insurgency and the bombing of Islamabad's Marriott Hotel. November's deadly terror attacks in Mumbai, allegedly carried out by 10 Pakistani militants trained here, further frayed nerves."
     

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