Timeless Tibetan Arts and Cultural<3

Discussion in 'Defence & Strategic Issues' started by ShyAngel, Jun 29, 2009.

  1. ShyAngel

    ShyAngel Founding Member

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    Hi, I just thought to open up this thread to share some of the awe inspiring arts of my beautiful cultural so enjoy.
    This is our goddess Palden Lhamo: The protector of His Holiness The Dalai Lama and Tibetan government and its people.
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    PaIden Lhamo
    Central Tibet, 14th century
    Distemper on cloth
    73.7 x 58.4 cm (29 x 23 in.)
    Pritzker Collection

    Palden Lhamo (Glorious Goddess) is a Tibetan form of the ancient Indian goddess Shridevi. Like her Indian precursor, Palden Lhamo rides a mule whose haunch is marked with an eye, an iconographic element associated with an early myth surrounding Shridevi. Once, while queen of Sri Lanka, Shridevi strenuously objected to her husband's practice of human sacrifice and threatened to kill their son if her husband's barbarism did not cease. When human sacrifice continued, she carried out her promise. As the goddess mounted a mule (covered with the flayed skin of her son) to flee the kingdom, the king aimed an arrow in her direction, hitting the mule's haunch. Shridevi removed the arrow and magically transformed the wound into an eye, thus augmenting her powers to see
    and watch over the realms of the Buddhist faith.

    Giuseppe Tucci and René de Nebesky-Wojkowitz have explored the development of Palden Lhamo in Tibet, demonstrating that while she served as a protector of the Buddhist faith (dharmapala)—the only female deity to do so—she was also associated with ancient pre-Buddhist
    deities, including those connected with the creation and suppression of disease.1 Her cult is said to have been introduced to Tibet by Urgyen Sangwa Sherab (act. 10th century?), perhaps the historical figure on the left in the top register. Although little is known about her early veneration, when worshiped by the Sakya and then the Gelukpa order, especially from the sixteenth century
    onward, this goddess became associated with the protection of Lhasa and of the Dalai Lama.2

    While she often appears in early Tibetan paintings as a subsidiary protector goddess (see cat. nos. 14, 17, 30), she is rarely depicted as the main subject in early paintings. This is the earliest such example published to date. Very little of the early liturgy is associated with Palden Lhamo, and one can offer only the most tentative identification of her entourage, based on later textual sources that only imperfectly match the iconography presented here. In this painting, the goddess holds a skull cup and a flaming sword, its hilt made of a scorpion.3 From her right earring a lion emerges; from the left, a snake. She cradles, under her left arm, a sack made from the skin of a mongoose, spilling
    jewels, but also described in the literature as containing diseases. A crescent moon appears in her headdress, and a solar disk adorns her navel. She rides on a sea of blood, indicated here by the dark red platform supporting her mount, below which swelling liquid is carefully delineated.
    Dark scrolls appear beneath and behind her mount, who is confronted by a makara-headed goddess (makarakuti), wearing a cape of flayed human skin, the left half of whose body is emaciated. In the two side registers are twelve attendant goddesses, none of whom corresponds
    precisely with known iconographic descriptions of Shridevi's retinue; they are probably the twelve Tansrung, whom Tucci describes as "ancient native deities of Tibet."4 Their wrathful appearance resembles that of the main goddess, and all ride fantastical animal mounts, including a dragon, a camel, a makara, and a nine-headed beast. In the bottom register are six further attendants: four
    goddesses riding mules, a standing deity wearing a flayed human skin, and another borne by a large bird. The full significance of this raw, powerful work will remain uncertain until future research more precisely determines the time and place of its execution and the full intent behind its wildly imaginative iconography.
     
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  3. ShyAngel

    ShyAngel Founding Member

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    Chakrasamvara Mandala
    Central Tibet, ca. first half of the 14th century
    Distemper on cloth
    68.6 x 57.2 cm (27 x 221/2 in.)
    Pritzker Collection
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    Vijravarahi:
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    This vibrant painting depicts Chakrasamvara and his consort, Vajravarahi, together with the deities who form their sacred assembly (mandala). The fourheaded, twelve-armed Chakrasamvara embraces Vajravarahi as he clasps the thunderbolt scepter (vajra) and the ritual bell (ghanta); his other arms hold the skin of an elephant, hand drum, ritual chopper, three ceremonial staffs, skull
    cup, noose, and head of the Hindu god Brahma. Kalaratri and Bhairava are trampled underfoot. Both central figures are adorned with the white bone ornaments and the necklaces of skulls and severed heads traditionally worn by wrathful Esoteric Buddhist deities. just outside Chakrasamvara's fiery halo are scenes associated with the eight cremation grounds (smashanas); these abbreviated scenes provide an interesting comparison with the more fully developed narrative in the earlier Chakrasamvara Mandala (cat. no. 2).

    Observing iconographic prescriptions for this deity, the artist included five groups of deities meant to form five concentric circles, but here they are arranged in registers. Within the main rectangle of the painting, resting on lotuses associated with the four cardinal points of the compass, are: Dakini (east, blue), Lama (north, green), Khandaroha (west, red), and Rupini (south, yellow). At the intermediate points of the compass are four skull cups (kapalas) that rest on vases supported by lotuses and
    that contain "the thought of enlightenment," blood, the five ambrosias, and "the five awakenings."' The second circle is called "the circle of thought" (chittachakra); it is represented by the eight blue male and female couples in the top register. The third circle, "the circle of speech" (vakchakra), is represented by the eight red male and female couples in the top and upper side registers. The
    fourth circle, "the circle of body" (kayachakra), can be seen in the white male and female couples in the side registers. And the fifth circle, "the circle of intuition" (samayachakra), appears in the lower register in the form of eight deities; the bicolored figures bear the colors associated with those quadrants of the mandala they are meant to bisect. Of considerable interest are the sixteen goddesses in the bottom register who appear in front of a red curtain. Each bears an offering, such as dance, song, incense, food, or garlands, which they present to the main figures in the mandala.

    The style of this painting may be compared with that of the late-thirteenth- or early-fourteenth century painting of Scenes from the Life of the Historical Buddha (cat. no.27). Like that work, this painting is bordered by red, green, and white rectangles surrounded by gold, a motif that suggests colored gems with gold settings. Both paintings also rely on a similar motif to distinguish registers within the painting (here, seen above the bottom register). The lotus petals in the two paintings are similar, as are the figures rendered by broad color fields with only occasional attempts at modeling. Costumes are also closely related, most especially those of the sixteen offering goddesses in this work and those of Sujata and the female attendants of the bodhisattva prince in the earlier work (cat. no. 27). It is also interesting to compare this work with the slightly later mandala seen here (cat. no. 43). The paintings differ chiefly in composition. Chakrasamvara and his consort dominate the later composition, as they are larger in height and width than in this work; they are also proportionally larger than their attendant deities, who are almost uniformly diminutive. The dominance of Chakrasamvara and Vajravarahi in the later work contrasts with that in the work under consideration, wherein less of the composition's area is given to Chakrasamvara and Vajravarahi, and the size of the attendant figures increases as one moves toward the bottom of the painting. Thus, while both paintings fulfill essentially the same iconographic requirement, differences
    in composition, color tone, and the artist's technical virtuosity all contribute to the different aesthetics seen in the two paintings.
     
  4. ShyAngel

    ShyAngel Founding Member

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    Kailash Thanka
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    The Tantric Buddhists believe that Kailash is the home of the Buddha Demchog (Chakrasamvara in Sanskrit, whose name is in fact, an epithet of Shiva) who represents supreme bliss, and his consort Dorje Phamo. The two symbolize compassion and wisdom, making Kailash and Manasarovar the perfect complement: father and mother of the Earth. Dorje Phamo is usually associated with a small peak next to Kailash called Tijung.

    Chakrasamvara Yab-Yum With Dorje Phamo
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    According to one of legends, the Buddha emanated the mandala palace on the top of Mount Kailash and adopted this archetype deity form of Chakrasamvara to teach the knowledge of tantra to Shiva and Parvati.

    Three hills rising near Kang Rimpoche are believed to be the homes of the Bodhisattvas Manjushri, Vajrapani, and Avalokiteshvara.

    Mount Meru is a center of the Universe according to Abhidharma cosmology.
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    Vairocana On Mount Meru

    There are numerous sites in the region associated with Guru Rinpoche (Padmasambhava), who is credited with finally establishing Buddhism as the main religion of Tibet in the 7th-8th century AD.

    It’s said that Milarepa, legendary guru-poet of the Karma Kagyu School, champion of Tantric Buddhism of 12th century AD, arrived in Tibet to challenge Naro Bon-chung, champion of the Bon religion.
    The two magicians engaged in a terrific sorcerers’ battle, but neither was able to gain a definite advantage. Finally, them agreed that whoever could reach the peak of Kailash most rapidly would be the victor.
    While Naro Bon-chung sat on a magic drum and soared upwards the slope, Milarepa’s followers were amazed to see him sitting still and meditating. When Naro Bon-chung was already near the top, Milarepa suddenly entered the action and overcame him by riding on the rays of the sun, thence winning the competition.
    He did, however, whirl a handful of snow on to the peak of nearby mountain, since known as Bonri, leaving it to the Bonpo and thereby assuring continued Bonpo connections with the region.
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    Milarepa On The Top Of Kailash
     
  5. ShyAngel

    ShyAngel Founding Member

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    Manasarovar

    Set amidst Mount Kailash and Mount Gurla Mandhata at height of 4,557 m above sea level is Manasarovar Lake, the highest freshwater body in the world. The lake stretches majestically over Tibetan Plateau with a circumference of about 88 km and covers an area of 320 km. From this lake originate four of the great rivers of the Indian subcontinent that flow in four cardinal directions before reaching the ocean.
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    Kailash And Manasarovar

    The word ‘manas’ means mind or consciousness; the name Manasarovar means Lake of Consciousness and Enlightenment.

    Tibetans say that when the Chakravartin (World Emperor) Nug Bam was cooking rice to feed the entire world, the hot water that was strained from the pot cooled and became the lake.

    According to Indian believes, Manasarovar was created by Brahma at the request; of the great Rishis. This mind born lake contains the essence of all the Vedas.

    Bathing in the icy sapphire water of Lake Manasarovar is considered to remove the sins of innumerable lifetimes.

    Adjacent to Manasarovar is Rakshas Tal, the Lake of Demons.

    The grand view of Mount Gulra Mandhata, Manasarovar and Rakshas Tal Lakes hypnotizes the onlooker into subliminal aura.
    Both the lakes are full of swans.

    Kora

    Pilgrims of several religions believe that circumambulating Mount Kailash on feet, known as the kora, has special significance. Buddhists believe that making one kora washes away the sins of a lifetime, and that 108 kora confer instant nirvana.

    The highest point of the kora is a pass at 5,630 meters. There is an inner kora that leads to a special pilgrimage site at 6,096 meters, Serdung Chuksum, the Cave of the Thirteen Golden Chortens. By tradition, this inner kora cannot be attempted unless one has made 13 kora (also known as the outer kora).
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    Some traditions also aver that the mountain is Shiva’s lingam and Lake Manasarovar below is the yoni of his consort Parvati.
     
  6. Flint

    Flint Senior Member Senior Member

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    Its always been my dream to visit Mt. Kailash. Such an inspiring place. Its motivated poets and philosophers for thousands of years.
     
  7. ShyAngel

    ShyAngel Founding Member

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    Hindus regard Mount Kailash as the earthly manifestation of Mount Meru - the spiritual center of the Universe. It is a World Pillar, its roots in the lowest hell and its top kissing the heavens. On the summit sits Lord Shiva sits in a state of perpetual meditation with his consort Parvati. There have been no recorded attempts to climb Mount Kailash; it is considered off limits to climbers in deference to Buddhist and Hindu beliefs. It is not clear whether this has ever been done. Buddhists believe that Milarepa is the only human being to have stood on its peak.Below, Manasarovar floats in the shadow of holy Kailash as the lake formed in the mind of God.
    [​IMG]
     
  8. ShyAngel

    ShyAngel Founding Member

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    Mount Kailash (6,714 m) is a peak in Tibet, in the Gangdise Mountains, which is part of the Himalayas.
    The word Kailasa means “crystal” in Sanskrit.
    In Tibetan, Kailas is called Kang Rinpoche, or the “Precious jewel of snows”. The Bon call it Yung-drung Gu-tzeg which means “Nine story swastika”, because there is a swastika symbol can be seen on the south face of the mountain.
     
  9. F-14

    F-14 Global Defence Moderator Senior Member

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    thank you shy a lot the only sad thing is that Mt Kilash and the manasarovar are Officially in Chinies hand
     
  10. ShyAngel

    ShyAngel Founding Member

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    Mount Kailash is symbolically viewed as the earthly manifestation of Mount Sumeru or Meru, as it is also known. Sumeru is considered the actual focus - the absolute central point - of the mandala of the universe. Some think that the name Sumeru is a reference to the ancient kingdom of Sumer that laid far to the west in Mesopotamia - maybe human race’s first city.
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    The cosmologies and origin myths of Asian religions speak of Kailash as the mythical Mount Meru, the Axis Mundi, the center and birth place of the entire world.
     
  11. Soham

    Soham DFI TEAM Senior Member

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    Shy,
    Are all these Gods and Goddesses part of Buddhism ?
     
  12. ShyAngel

    ShyAngel Founding Member

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    And yet they have no idea about its holiness and the existence of it. And it makes no sense to them. Sad very sad! It's like having your children over the hands of dirty pigs.
    Yuckkkkk! :(
     
  13. F-14

    F-14 Global Defence Moderator Senior Member

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    some day its my wish to go to Kilash and never come back again to this earth this place of birth and misary
     
  14. ShyAngel

    ShyAngel Founding Member

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    Ofcourse or else they won't be in this thread!
    These are the arts of Newaris in Nepal which is the pride of Tibet and Tibetan<3 Newaris are mix race of nepalese and tibetan so they are both born hindu and buddhist mixed, they are very very intelligent. They are all born intelligent and all these idols and paintings of ancient Tibet were all made by Newari. Kherong is the hot spot of trading and most tibetans in Kherong region and Newaris from Nepal ruled the Silk Route for many centuries in ancient Tibet and Indian boarder. So the wealth of all these Tibetan arts were collected by Newaris in Nepal. P.S. The native language of kherong region of tibet is Devanagri which is the hardcore sanskrit which we used it only in buddhist scriptures. So they know a lot about the gods and goddess of Tibet!
     
  15. ShyAngel

    ShyAngel Founding Member

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    Wait till I post the image of kashmiri style of tibetan arts and you guys will all wish to see your brides in those image. he he he
     
  16. ShyAngel

    ShyAngel Founding Member

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    I will make sure I get to spent the last period of my life there including Varanasi<3 he he he
     
  17. ShyAngel

    ShyAngel Founding Member

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    [​IMG]
    Western Tibet; late 10th - early 11th century
    Brass with inlays of copper and silver
    Lord Avalokiteshvara in Kashmiri style........
     
  18. ShyAngel

    ShyAngel Founding Member

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  19. ShyAngel

    ShyAngel Founding Member

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    Mandala
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    A mandala is a form of Buddhist prayer and art that is usually associated with a particular Buddha and his ascension to enlightenment. Regarded as a powerful center of psychic energy, it symbolizes the macrocosm of the universe, the miniature universe of the practitioner and the platform on which the Buddha addresses his followers. The design for the mandala is said to have been brought to Tibet by the legendary 1,000-year-old lama, Guru Rinpoche, in the Each Ox Year of 749.

    A typical mandala measures five feet across and contains a pictorial diagram of Buddhist deities in circular concentric geometric shapes. Many are shaped like a lotus flower with a round center and eight pedals, with a central deity surrounded by four to eight other deities who are manifestations of the central figure. The deities are often accompanied by consorts. In large mandalas there may several dozen circles of deities, with hundreds of deities.

    Mandalas can be painted, constructed of stone, embroidered, sculptured or even serve as the layout plan for entire monasteries.. Most are painstakingly made from sand, preferably sand made from millions of grains of crushed, vegetable-died marble. The tradition of making mandalas is said to be derived from ancient folk religions and Hinduism. Today mandalas are mostly made by followers of Tantric Buddhism.

    Most mandalas are destroyed after a few hours or days. The destruction of mandalas after a short time ties in with the Buddhist idea that nothing is permanent and things are always in a flux and one should not become too attached to things because they will disappear and bring unhappiness.

    Meaning and Uses of Mandalas
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    Making a mandala Buddhists use mandalas as aids for mediation. Both making a mandala and gazing at one are regarded as forms of meditation. The Swiss psychoanalyst Carl Jung called mandalas universal maps of the human subconscious and "antidotes for the chaotic states of mind." He said their circular shape was a symbol of the divine.

    Mandalas have three levels: 1) the outer level representing the universe; 2) the inner level showing the route to enlightenment; and the 3) secret level depicting the balance between the body and mind. Each shape is said to contain an attribute of a deity, and sometimes these shapes are used to forecast the future.

    Mandalas aid individuals in visualizing various celestial Buddha realms. Two dimensional ones are regarded as part of the three-dimensional world of the central figure and a microcosm of the universe. During meditation a user using a mandala as a visual aid focuses on the deity, visualizing up to 722 deities associated with it, with the deity disappearing into nothingness and re-emerging as the deity. To do this takes extraordinary concentration.

    Creation of the Mandala


    Destroying a mandala Describing a monk making a mandala, Nicholas Day wrote in the Washington Post: "The monks precisely plop the sand down on fine lines...A false breath, a sudden shift of elbow or the wrist, and the mandala would scatter, kaleidoscopic dust in the wind...The monks themselves—almost prostrate on the table...convey a spiritual energy and sense of peace of unearthly patience. They work diligently and silently, although occasionally they stop briefly to debate their work in Tibetan. They work two-hour stretches, often in positions that look painful."

    Day wrote: "the mandala is created—in a breathtaking paint-by numbers type of production—with 23 colors of sand and a highly detailed outline that the monks drew...The sand is poured through metal funnels called chak-pur, rubbing a rod against the ridged surface of the chak-pur produces vibrations that causes the sand to run out smoothly. The vibrations also produces noises—hoarse and dissonant—that sound like a yard full of crickets."

    One monk told the Washington Post, "we never consider this an artistic work...It's like having a beautiful garden in which all kinds of different flowers grow. If there was just one flower, it wouldn't be very beautiful."

    Three-Dimensional Mandalas
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    Three-dimensional mandalas look like elaborately-sculpted wooden wedding cakes and sometimes take years to make. Some of them are representation of the Shi-Tro mandala, a mansion for deities with so much power it can release any person from his or her negative karma. Many three-dimensional mandalas were destroyed during the Cultural Revolution.

    Describing one three-dimensional mandala, Teresa Watanbe wrote in the Los Angeles Times, "The intricate work included wood working, painting and shaping figures ranging from sea dragons to deities. But the dense spiritual meaning embedded in every doorway and post, measurement and form, is most striking."

    "The floor doors to the palace, for instance, represent the 'four immeasurables' of loving kindness, compassion, equanimity and joy. There are lion beams signifying strength and a fire circle in which all negative forces are burned and transformed into wisdom."
     
  20. ShyAngel

    ShyAngel Founding Member

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    Lord of hell and death, Lord Yama with his necklace of ball. he he he
    It is believe in our buddhist scripture that any human being who do bad things regarding the lust, and etc, etc, were all cut off their balls and etc and burn them in hot boiling water. He would cut off their balls and collect them as a necklace on his neck.
    [​IMG]
     
  21. ShyAngel

    ShyAngel Founding Member

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    [​IMG]
    Yama and Consort
    Tibet
    15th century
    Copper alloy, gilt, cold gold, paint, semi-precious stones

    Yama, "Lord of Death" and "King of the Law" unites with his consort in the vigorous pose of fierce deities. Both wear skull-studded crowns; his is a garland of severed human heads; hers is a girdle of human bone. They are supported by Yama's vehicle, a water buffalo. Originally a Hindu deity, Yama was eventually incorporated into the Buddhist pantheon as a protector.
     

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