Time to stop demonisation of Narendra Modi

Discussion in 'Politics & Society' started by Oracle, Feb 13, 2012.

  1. Oracle

    Oracle New Member

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    B Raman

    The Gujarat chief minister's future should be decided by the people not on the basis of recycled unproven allegations, but on the basis of what he has achieved as an administrator, his ideas and vision for the future, and his capability to achieve them, says B Raman.

    The allegations made against Narendra Modi, chief minister of Gujarat, in connection with some incidents of violence against Muslims during the communal disturbances of 2002 were quite serious. They amounted to charges of conscious inaction amounting to criminal complicity.

    These allegations warranted thorough investigation by a body of professional investigators and follow-up action in the form of criminal prosecution if the allegations proved to be correct during the investigation.

    Such a body was constituted by the judiciary through the setting-up of a Special Investigation Team (SIT) headed by R K Raghavan, former director of the Central Bureau of Investigation. Raghavan is a highly distinguished officer of the Indian Police Service known for his professionalism, integrity, independence and objectivity.

    Raghavan has been associated with many complex criminal investigations when he headed the CBI and continues to be associated with matters relating to the police even after his retirement.

    After a thorough and professional investigation lasting about two years, the SIT headed by him has reportedly concluded that its investigation did not unearth any evidence that could warrant the prosecution of Modi under any charge.

    In other words, the allegations of criminal complicity against Modi stand disproved. The serious allegations against Modi were not pushed under the carpet. He was not exempted from facing the due process of the law in the nature of a criminal investigation. He was treated like any other citizen despite the high office held by him and subjected to a criminal investigation by a team of distinguished professionals.

    When the SIT has cleared him of the charges levelled against him by some sections of the public -- particularly from the Muslim community -- and by some human rights activists, fairness of criminal justice demands that the demonisation campaign against him should be discontinued and the sword hanging over his head should be removed. He has been cleared honourably and not conditionally.

    Instead of doing so, his political and non-governmental detractors seem determined not to accept the conclusions of the SIT and to keep up the campaign of denigration and demonisation against him by recycling the allegations which have already been enquired into and found unproven by the SIT.

    It is no longer a case of the law taking its own course, but one of malicious witch-hunt against a political leader by his political opponents and by sections of the media and lawyers and others who are not well disposed towards him. Even after having failed to prove the charges before the SIT, they are determined to keep their vicious campaign alive for political reasons and not for reasons of natural justice.

    Their ill-motivated attempts have to be deplored by all right-thinking persons, who should demand that the campaign of demonisation should stop immediately. Modi has so far not allowed this campaign to negatively affect his administration of the state of Gujarat for the last 10 years. The state has made considerable progress under his leadership. This is acknowledged by independent-minded observers and even by persons who are not comfortable with him as an individual.

    Narendra Modi's future should be decided by the people not on the basis of the recycled unproven allegations, but on the basis of what he has already achieved as an administrator, his ideas and vision for the future and his capability for achieving them.

    Those who still have reservations regarding his style of leadership and do not agree with those who praise his governance should confront him politically and establish before the people that his achievements and capabilities are overrated if that is what they feel.

    But his detractors find themselves on a weak ground in respect of a political campaign against him based on objective factors. They are, therefore, trying to keep alive the demonisation in the hope of thereby damaging and destroying his future political career. This has to be strongly deplored and I have no hesitation in doing so.

    I have never been an uncritical admirer of Modi. Nor am I in the ranks of his perpetual demonisers. I have always sought to judge him as objectively as I can. It is my view that the demonisation campaign against him must stop now.

    Rediff
     
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  3. Oracle

    Oracle New Member

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    Good article. However, Modi should take responsibility for the loss of lives & property during the riots, as he was the CM, and say sorry to all communities affected. This would be tough for people to forget, specially those who lost their near and dear ones, as well as their property, but this would be a start. Time to move on.
     
  4. sob

    sob Moderator Moderator

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    Rozi Roti of many people will be over if they stop demonising Modi.

    However that still does not absolve him of the fact that under his administration there were riots of such a magnitude, even though he may not be directly involved.
     
  5. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    "Wise men are those who move with the wind," the judges observed in the Chief's Case.

    In other words, be a conformist and play safe.
     
  6. Vyom

    Vyom Seeker Elite Member

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    That would be a political suicide. All he can do is to heal the wounds of the victims by deeds and not by words. He should ensure that they are compensated properly and that they are provided every opportunity to live a better future.
     
  7. iNDiAN.96

    iNDiAN.96 Nationalist Senior Member

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    Hear him roar! Modi’s critics are fighting a lost battle

    [​IMG]

    Today’s proceedings in the Magistrate’s Court in Ahmedabad, which is hearing one significant strand of the investigations into the 2002 Gujarat riots, proved a damp squib for those who expected a dramatic denouement.

    From leaked (but unconfirmed) accounts of the Special Investigation Team report, we had been led to believe that the SIT had given a ‘clean chit’ to Gujarat Chief Minister Narendra Modi by acknowledging that there was no “prosecutable evidence” against him to establish that he was part of a governmental conspiracy to allow Hindu rioters a free hand in securing ‘vigilante justice’ during the hellish days that followed the Godhra train fire (in which Hindu pilgrims were massacred).

    Even though such an outcome wouldn’t have meant a formal closure to the legal proceedings – that must await another round of final hearings – it would have, as Firstpost had argued here, effectively meant that the ghost of the 2002 riots, which had haunted Modi for a decade now, would have been exorcised.

    Instead, the legal skirmish in the court today revolved around who had the locus standi to receive the copy of the report, and a ruling on that will be delivered on Wednesday.

    Yet, the seeming placidity in today’s proceedings only masks the undercurrents of the significance of the legal and political battles that are being waged around the 2002 Gujarat riots. And the interplay of those two battles only establishes that those who are looking desperately to pin Modi to the 2002 riots, perhaps out of a genuine sense of wanting to see justice done (or perhaps with their agenda), are effectively helping him politically, even if that is not their intention.

    There are many strands to the discussion around the 2002 Gujarat riots. AFP
    There are many strands to the discussion around the 2002 Gujarat riots. There are, first and foremost, the personal tragedies of the victims and their relatives; their collective grief is embodied in the haggard form of Zakhia Jafri, the widow knocking on the doors of justice on behalf of her husband and former Congress MP Ehsaan Jafri, who was burnt to death by mobs at the Gulbarg Society massacre.

    It was at Zakia Jafri’s instance that the Supreme Court directed the SIT to investigate not just the Gulbarg Society massacre but pretty much all the incidences of riots in nine districts of Gujarat in late February and early March of 2002. Which is why there was so much riding on this case, and the various litigants and petitioners are looking to force the Modi government on the defensive.

    But in equal measure, the Gujarat riots also provided a backdrop for the politics that unfolded in the state in the elections that were held in their wake. On this terrain, Modi has been the consummate winner, and even the most shrill election campaigns seeking to implicate him – most memorably Congress president Sonia Gandhi’s denunciation of Modi as “maut ka saudagar” (merchant of death) – have failed miserably.

    That happened because Modi benefited from the consolidation of Hindu votes in the 2002 Assembly elections and the 2004 general elections. Even in the 2007 Assembly election, he campaigned as the defender of the Hindu faith against the “pseudo-secular” politics of the Congress – and his message found resonance with the Gujarat electorate.

    In other words, in the years following the 2002 riots, Modi was not forced on the defensive by the taint of the riots: instead, he directly confronted the charge that he was a “merchant of death” and roared to power by riding on the notion of Gujarati and Hindu pride. In the political arena, even the most vitriolic campaigns pegging him to the 2002 riots have been dismissed not once but twice by the State’s voters.

    Having consolidated the Hindu vote, and having dramatically changed the political idiom in the State by doing away with “vote bank politics”, Modi then sought to reinvent himself by pitching the development of Gujarat and good governance as his primary plank. Where once he roared like a lion, he has since modulated his voice – and tempered his language – to emphasise sadbhavana rather than Hindu pride.

    Perhaps he has an eye on central leadership of his party, and of prime ministership, and is therefore for looking for wider acceptance at the national level. Perhaps he calculates that his political roadmap will be charted if he wins the Gujarat Assembly election due later this year emphatically. His political opponents’ best chance of pre-empting his ascendance at the national level lies in storming his Gujarat fortress.

    But by raking up the Gujarat riots at the political level even a decade later, his opponents are virtually gifting Modi an opportunity to reinforce his hold on his home turf, which if anything will enhance his leverage to project himself nationally. By harping on the 2002 riots, they have given him a chance to project himself – as he did yesterday at the conclusion of the sadbhavana mission at Ambaji – as the defender of Gujarati pride against “fresh attacks” and defamation campaigns. They have allowed him to find his roar again.

    In the decade gone by, the failure of Modi’s political opponents to pin him to the riots has dramatically altered the perception of even unbiased commentators about the nature of the campaign against him. Analyst B Raman, who is no “uncritical admirer of Modi,” argues that the “demonisation” of Modi must stop.

    “It is no longer a case of the law taking its own course, but one of malicious witch-hunt against a political leader by his political opponents and by sections of the media and lawyers and others who are not well disposed towards him. Even after having failed to prove the charges before the SIT, they are determined to keep their vicious campaign alive for political reasons and not for reasons of natural justice.

    Clearly, the tide of public opinion, and even that of informed commentators, is effectively turning against the very shrill political campaign against Modi, which has proved fruitless in its objective. It only reflects the lack of political imagination of his opponents if they persist with it.

    They will effectively be gifting the game to Modi – and facilitating his elevation to the national stage – unless they too find some way to exorcise the ghost of the 2002 riots that they continue to be haunted by.

    http://www.firstpost.com/politics/hear-him-roar-modis-critics-are-fighting-a-lost-battle-211786.html
     

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