The Six Engine VTOL flying machine

Discussion in 'Military Aviation' started by H.A., Jan 12, 2012.

  1. H.A.

    H.A. Senior Member Senior Member

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    The current technology twin tilt rotor V22 Osprey’s recent performance is used as the best example of twin tilt rotor problems.The failure of either propulsion unit to produce thrust, results in the loss of the aircraft and occupants. The cross coupled shaft system provides a marginal performance backup limited to engine failure, not gearbox or rotor failures. The loss of 50% of this aircraft’s power results in its’ inability to continue its’ mission and in many circumstances requires immediate landing. The present invention solves this problem with its’ fundamental design, providing for continued flight following the complete loss of thrust by any propulsion unit, no matter what the cause.Inability to use evasive maneuvering tactics to avoid hostile fire, similar to that found in high threat landing zones. Quick maneuvering has resulted in the cracking and breaking of rotor root components which may result in the loss of a blade, and therefore the aircraft. The 38 foot rotors are limited to about 10 degree flapping angles. Quick maneuvering can (and has) easily exceed this angle resulting in the failure of a rotor and the potential loss of the aircraft. This limited maneuverability might be acceptable for commercial operations, but not for the intended applications of the military.Read more: http://defensetech.org/#ixzz1jFTAn6PX
     
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  3. H.A.

    H.A. Senior Member Senior Member

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    I tried to add pictures....however i could not do it....don't know why?
     

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