The Shangri-La Dialogue- 2012

Discussion in 'Indo Pacific & East Asia' started by Zebra, Jun 2, 2012.

  1. Zebra

    Zebra Senior Member Senior Member

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    The 11th IISS Asia Security Summit, the Shangri-La Dialogue, is underway in Singapore.

    First Plenary Session – Leon Panetta, Secretary of Defense, United States.


    The 11th IISS Asia Security Summit
    The Shangri-La Dialogue
    Singapore
    Saturday 02 June 2012
     
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  3. Zebra

    Zebra Senior Member Senior Member

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    Singapore
    Saturday 02 June 2012
    First Plenary SessionThe US Rebalance Towards the Asia-Pacific Q&A Session
    Leon Panetta
    Secretary of Defense, United States.

     
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  4. Zebra

    Zebra Senior Member Senior Member

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    [​IMG]

    IISS Second Plenary Session – A K Antony

    The 11th IISS Asia Security Summit
    The Shangri-La Dialogue
    Singapore
    Saturday June 2012

    Second Plenary Session
    'Protecting Maritime Freedoms': A K Antony
    Minister of Defence, India
    As Prepared
     
  5. Zebra

    Zebra Senior Member Senior Member

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    Panetta open to military relations with Burma

    June 2, 2012 3:02 AM

    [​IMG]
    [U.S. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta, right, and Australia's Defense Minister Stephen Smith, left, attend the opening session of the IISS Shangri-la Security Summit in Singapore on Friday June 1, 2012. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E)]

    (AP) SINGAPORE - Defense Secretary Leon Panetta told Asian leaders Saturday that the U.S. is open to forging better military ties with Burma, if political and human rights reforms there continue.

    His comments to a defense conference here reflected new efforts by the Obama administration to ease sanctions on the Asian nation, which is also known as Myanmar, as it moves to implement democratic reforms.

    Assuming Burma is able to implement reforms and continue efforts to open up its political system, the Pentagon would be willing to have discussions about how the two nations can improve their military relationship, Panetta said.

    "In dealing with countries of the Asia-Pacific region, this is not a Cold War situation where the U.S. barges in, builds permanent bases and tries to establish a power base in this region," Panetta said, responding to a question after his speech here at the Shangri-La Dialogue, a prominent defense conference......

    Panetta open to military relations with Burma - CBS News
     
  6. ejazr

    ejazr Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    Shangri La dialogues is one of the increasingly important track one initiatives and this year has some really interesting points to note. I usually find the Q&A session more insightful than the main speech.

    BD is also a new participant which now adds to India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka in the South Asian countries bloc. I will post some other important events and my takes here later. But one thing to ponder is that Leon Panetta has mentioned that 70% of their navy will now be based in the Pacific which shows a decisive turn towards this region.
     
  7. Zebra

    Zebra Senior Member Senior Member

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    Old news but relevant here.
    Now here we go, 60% or 70% US Naval Fleet will be there in the Region.

    Look East, and act East, too: US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton to India

    Sangeetha Kandavel & Joe A Scaria, ET Bureau Jul 20, 2011, 07.21pm IST

    CHENNAI: Visiting US secretary of state Hillary Clinton on Wednesday advocated a more active policy initiative from India with reference to its stature and policies in Asia and the East.

    Clinton, who said she believed "21st century will be written in Asia" and that India will have a key role in shaping it, said the Indo-US ties will be one of the defining partnerships of the new century.


    http://articles.economictimes.indiatimes.com/2011-07-20/news/29794815_1_state-hillary-clinton-india-asia-pacific-region
     
  8. W.G.Ewald

    W.G.Ewald Defence Professionals/ DFI member of 2 Defence Professionals

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    Shangri-La - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
     
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  9. latsar

    latsar Regular Member

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    Good for ASEAN ,Japan,SK,Aussies and India, would keep China from attempting fanciful misadventures in south china sea and the growing Indian Naval might will stop China misadventures in Indian Ocean .
     
  10. Zebra

    Zebra Senior Member Senior Member

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    Commentary: Not to make waves in South China Sea

    2012-06-02, 11:08

    by Deng Yushan

    BEIJING, June 2 (Xinhua) -- The ongoing Shangri-La Dialogue in Singapore enters volatile waters on Saturday, as participating defense officials and security scholars wade into the territorial disputes in South China Sea between China and some of its neighbors.

    On the backdrop two realities are prominent: the recent escalation of tensions over South China Sea and the United States' so-called "pivot" to the Asia-Pacific. The former has shown signs of calming down, while the latter keeps rumbling on.

    Ill-grounded clamors against China stemming from prejudice and misperception have also been rending the air, with some narrow-gauge critics railing at what they brand as Beijing's assertiveness and belligerence over the South China Sea issues and crying for outside intervention.

    With South China Sea rolling and the Asia-Pacific landscape changing, such a sensitive moment demands sobriety, and such an intricate situation requires discipline. The indiscriminate tendency to portray China as the bad guy is not only undesirable but detrimental.

    To set the record straight, notwithstanding the South China Sea rows, maritime freedom in this strategic and busy body of water has never been disturbed. The much-hyped "China threat" to the freedom of navigation in South China Sea is a pure invention.

    Meanwhile, it is as naive to peddle the alleged Chinese intention to shut Asia's front door to the United States as to build a longitudinal Berlin Wall across the Pacific. Despite the mysteries surrounding Washington's shift, Beijing has conveyed its hope that the superpower would "play a positive and constructive role in the region."

    As regards the South China Sea tensions, it is some other claimants, whether emboldened by the United States' new posture or not, that sparked the fire and have been stoking the flames. In contrast, China's measured and responsible response has prevented what were basically fishery matters from spiraling out of control.

    Beijing's South China Sea policy is consistent. Although China has seen its political, economic and military strengths growing markedly,fabricating new claims is not in its blood. The Chinese government is committed to seeking a peaceful solution to the disputes, as vindicated by China's recent history of dispute settlement.

    It is China's genuine wish to turn South China Sea into a sea of peace, friendship and cooperation, and the prospect is widely shared across the region and the world at large. Before that dream comes true, it serves the best interests of all concerned that they, as Beijing has proposed, shelve differences and pursue joint development.

    Between that harmonious vision and the harsh reality lies a lack of trust that breeds misunderstanding, misjudgment and even misact. Therefore, the Shangri-La Dialogue and other similar security forums should serve as opportunities to boost communication and mutual trust instead of to further complicate and exacerbate existing conflicts.

    That said, it is advisable for some to refrain from muddying the waters and fishing therein and for some others to desist from dancing behind a Pied Piper whose magic tone, as tempting as it is, might lead its followers astray.

    Commentary: Not to make waves in South China Sea | My Sinchew
     
  11. Zebra

    Zebra Senior Member Senior Member

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    China warns US from muddying waters in S China Sea

    Last Updated: Saturday, June 02, 2012, 22:44

    Beijing: It was no time to "make waves" in the disputed South China Sea and dance behind a "Pied Piper", China's official news agency warned on Saturday, after US said it would shift the bulk of its naval fleet to the Pacific Ocean by 2020.

    "It is advisable for some to refrain from muddying the waters and fishing therein and for some others to desist from dancing behind a Pied Piper whose magic tone, as tempting as it is, might lead its followers astray," said Xinhua in a commentary, referring to the sea, which is part of the Pacific and the subject of overlapping territorial claims.

    China claims the South China Sea in full, and it is also claimed in whole or part by Taiwan, Brunei, Vietnam, Malaysia and the Philippines.
    The much-hyped China threat to the freedom of navigation in South China Sea is a pure invention, Xinhua said.
    "China has seen its political, economic and military strengths growing markedly,fabricating new claims is not in its blood," said the agency.

    It was Beijing's "genuine wish" to turn the South China Sea "into a sea of peace, friendship and cooperation," added Xinhua, in the commentary titled 'Not to make waves in South China Sea'.

    In a major re-posturing, US today announced it will shift the bulk of its naval fleet including as many as six aircraft carriers to the Pacific by 2020 as part of new strategic focus on Asia.

    The decision to deploy more warships to the Pacific Ocean, Defence Secretary Leon Panetta said, was part of a "steady, deliberate" effort to bolster the US role in the area, deemed vital to American interest recently by President Barack Obama.

    China warns US from muddying waters in S China Sea
     
  12. Zebra

    Zebra Senior Member Senior Member

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    US flexes Pacific muscle

    John Garnaut
    June 3, 2012

    AUSTRALIA has thrown its support behind a ''rebalancing'' of American military might in the Pacific region, which promises to deepen strategic rivalries with China.

    Defence Minister Stephen Smith yesterday spoke of the ''positive impact'' of the United States on regional security, just hours before the US presented its most detailed plan of how it will bulk up military might into the Pacific region while making budget cuts elsewhere.

    Chinese analysts said the US and Australian comments would provide more ammunition to those in China who argued that the US was using its allies to ''contain'' China's rise.

    But, they said, the civilian Chinese leadership was unlikely to be drawn into a new verbal spat with the US or Australia as it continues to play down diplomatic incidents - including the arrest of an alleged American spy - in an attempt to smooth the road to a once-a-decade leadership transition later this year.

    ''By 2020, the navy will reposture its forces from today's roughly 50-50 split between the Pacific and the Atlantic to about a 60-40 split between those oceans,'' US Defence Secretary Leon Panetta told Asian officials at a conference in Singapore yesterday.

    ''That will include six aircraft carriers in this region, a majority of our cruisers, destroyers, combat ships and submarines,'' he said.

    ''Make no mistake - in a steady, deliberate and sustainable way - the United States military is rebalancing and brings enhanced capabilities to this vital region.''

    Mr Smith spoke at the same Shangri-La conference in Singapore, en route to Beijing, making his first visit as Defence Minister.

    A new book - The Kingdom and the Quarry: China, Australia, Fear and Greed, by David Uren - has revealed the existence of a secret chapter in Australia's 2009 Defence White Paper that contemplated war with China.

    Mr Smith yesterday dismissed the possibility that American military and economic power would ''somehow be rapidly eclipsed overnight as a result of the new distribution of power to Asia''.

    ''In Australia's view, the United States has underwritten stability in the Asia-Pacific for the past half-century and will continue to be the single most important strategic factor in our region for the foreseeable future,'' he said.

    But the US announcement is one more step towards a militaristic rivalry between the world's two largest powers.

    ''The strategic rivalry between Beijing and Washington is becoming more profound,'' said Shi Yinhong, professor of international relations at the People's University of China.

    ''At least into the next generation we will continue to see strategic rivalry becoming more profound and more widespread.''

    Andrew Davies, director of military operations and capabilities at the Australian Strategic Policy Institute, said there was too much economic integration between China and the US to allow a Soviet-style cold war to develop between the two powers.

    But, he said, the strategic rivalry was becoming more militaristic.

    Beijing and Washington have managed to smooth over a series of diplomatic incidents in recent months.

    In recent days it has emerged that the personal assistant to a vice-minister at China's Ministry of State Security has been detained in China on charges of spying for the US.

    Last month the US gave political refuge to the Chinese human rights activist Chen Guangcheng.

    In February China's most famous policeman, Wang Lijun, sought refuge in another US diplomatic mission, precipitating the purge of a Politburo member, Bo Xilai.


    US flexes Pacific muscle
     
  13. Zebra

    Zebra Senior Member Senior Member

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    US says bulk of navy shifting to Pacific by 2020

    Sun, Jun 03, 2012 - Page 1 

    China’s Xinhua news agency warned yesterday it was no time to “make waves” in the disputed South China Sea, after the US said it would shift the bulk of its naval fleet to the Pacific Ocean by 2020.

    “It is advisable for some to refrain from muddying the waters and fishing therein,” said Xinhua, referring to the sea, which is part of the Pacific and the subject of overlapping territorial claims.

    China claims the sea in full, and it is also claimed in whole or part by Taiwan, Brunei, Vietnam, Malaysia and the Philippines.

    “As regards the South China Sea tensions, it is some other claimants, whether emboldened by the United States’ new posture or not, that sparked the fire and have been stoking the flames,” the agency said.

    It was Beijing’s “genuine wish” to turn the South China Sea “into a sea of peace, friendship and cooperation,” Xinhua added. :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:

    The commentary was a reaction to US Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta telling a summit in Singapore yesterday that the US would shift the bulk of its naval fleet to the Pacific as part of a new strategic focus on Asia,

    The decision to deploy more ships to the Pacific Ocean, along with expanding a network of military partnerships, was part of a “steady, deliberate” effort to bolster the US role in an area deemed vital to the US’ future, he said.

    He insisted the switch in strategy was not a challenge to China, saying both countries had a common interest in promoting security and trade in the region.

    “By 2020, the navy will re-posture its forces from today’s roughly 50/50 percent split between the Pacific and the Atlantic to about a 60/40 split between those oceans,” Panetta said.

    “That will include six aircraft carriers in this region, a majority of our cruisers, destroyers, littoral combat ships and submarines,” he added.

    The US Navy currently has a fleet of 285 ships, with about half of those vessels deployed or assigned to the Pacific.

    Although the total size of the overall fleet might decline in coming years depending on budget pressures, Pentagon officials said the number of US naval ships in the Pacific would rise in absolute terms.

    The US also planned to expand military exercises in the Pacific and to conduct more port visits over a wider area extending to the Indian Ocean.

    Panetta was speaking to mainly Asian defense officials and officers from 27 countries at the Shangri-la Dialogue, an annual summit organized by the London-based International Institute for Strategic Studies.

    Unlike previous summits, China chose not to send a high-level delegation to the event, prompting speculation as to what lay behind the move.

    Since US President Barack Obama unveiled plans in January to shift toward Asia, the Pentagon has offered up few details about how it intends to achieve that goal.

    Yesterday’s announcement on the future of the US fleet provided the clearest evidence yet of a shift to Asia, and the speech appeared designed to reassure allies that Washington would back its much-publicized “pivot” to Asia with tangible action.

    In his speech, Panetta said budget woes in Washington would not affect the plan to tilt towards Asia, which he said would take years to fully realize.

    The US planned new investments in capabilities needed “to project power and operate in the Asia-Pacific,” including radar-evading fighter jets, a new long-distance bomber, electronic warfare and missile defenses, he said.

    US says bulk of navy shifting to Pacific by 2020 - Taipei Times
     
  14. Zebra

    Zebra Senior Member Senior Member

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    Canada Eyes Singapore Hub as U.S. Shifts

    Jun. 3, 2012 - 04:28PM
    By AGENCE FRANCE-PRESS

    SINGAPORE — Singapore said June 3 that it was studying a proposal from Canada to set up a logistics facility in the city-state for disaster relief efforts, reportedly to support a U.S. military shift to Asia.

    Canadian Defence Minister Peter Gordon MacKay said in an interview with The Canadian Press that the proposal was part of Ottawa’s efforts to back up the U.S. military “pivot” toward the Asia-Pacific region, which has irked China.

    “The Canadians have proposed setting up a logistics support hub in Singapore for their regional humanitarian assistance and disaster relief efforts,” a spokesman for the Singapore foreign ministry told AFP.

    “We are currently studying their proposal,” he said, giving no further details.

    MacKay was quoted as saying that the proposed deal with Singapore would resemble arrangements Canada has with Kuwait and Jamaica, which has given the country military footholds in the Middle East and the Caribbean.

    MacKay is in Singapore with other defense chiefs to attend the Shangri-La Dialogue, an annual security conference that ended June 3.

    U.S. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta told the conference June 2 that Washington will shift the bulk of its naval fleet to the Pacific by 2020 as part of its new strategic focus on Asia, amid China’s rising influence.

    The Pentagon already plans to start rotating “littoral combat ships” — small vessels intended for operations close to shore — through a base in Singapore, a long-standing ally of the U.S.

    Speaking at the conference June 3, MacKay did not directly refer to the proposal but stressed the need for greater global cooperation in disaster relief efforts.

    He recalled that Canadian troops were among the international forces involved in the massive relief operation that followed the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, which killed an estimated 220,000 people.

    Learning lessons from that disaster, Canadian forces were quicker to respond when a major earthquake struck Haiti in 2010, carrying more supplies with their C-17 military transport planes, MacKay said.

    “We realize how critical connectivity with all of our partners, friends and allies remains to ensuring that we can coordinate responses more quickly,” he said.

    The Asian Development Bank in March said climate-related disasters had displaced more than 42 million people in Asia over the past two years.

    The Asia-Pacific “is the global area most prone to natural disasters, both in terms of the absolute number of disasters and of populations affected,” it said in a report.


    Canada Eyes Singapore Hub as U.S. Shifts | Defense News | defensenews.com
     
  15. ejazr

    ejazr Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    Shangri La Dialogue: 'Anodyne' Antony belied expectations | TwoCircles.net

    "Shangri La" is the remote Himalayan monastery in James Hilton's 1933 novel where the survivors of a plane crash receive, from the presiding Lama, a unique philosophy of moderation and pacifism. Even though the "Shangri La Dialogue" (SLD) has a less exotic provenance (it is named after the Singapore hotel which provides the venue) the aims of this annual conference, organized by the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS), are no less lofty.

    The SLD has become a facilitator and catalyst for the development of defence and security initiatives in the Asia-Pacific and an important Track 1 1/2 rendezvous for national security functionaries.

    Inaugurated by the Indonesian President, Dr. Yudhoyono, in the presence of the Singaporean PM, the 11th SLD, held on June 1 and 2, 2012, saw, amongst others, the US Secretary Defence, as well as the Defence Ministers of Australia, France, Japan, India, Indonesia, Malaysia and Myanmar speak during plenary sessions. The orations during the course of this event provide an opportunity for the speakers to clearly articulate national security perspectives before an influential international audience which takes careful note and often responds during a traditionally freewheeling Q&A session. Structured break-out sessions are used to bring focus on critical areas. A scan of important speeches shows that, like every other year, the 11th SLD, too, provided many valuable insights which Indian policy-makers need to take note of.

    President Yudhoyono's keynote address struck an unusually (for that country) positive and upbeat note, speaking of Indonesia's growing economic confidence and military influence. He defined a strategic culture of "inclusive regionalism" and offered comfort to countries passing through the Arab Spring by candidly quoting Indonesia's own example wherein things had "got worse before they got better".

    He urged the ASEAN-China Working Group to speedily formulate the Code of Conduct for South China Sea. In his call for the Indian Ocean to be kept free of new rivalry, India found no mention. Offering assurances of transparency in the context of Indonesia's ongoing military modernization, he lent strong support for the principle of "partnership diplomacy".

    SLD is, customarily, the setting where the US offers to its often insecure, Asia-Pacific partners an annual reassurance of continuing regional commitment. Defence Secretary Leon Panetta did more than that as he promised a "deeper and more enduring US partnership role", designed to advance security and prosperity of the Asia-Pacific through "rebalancing."

    Speaking of a new defence strategy, he claimed that a smaller and leaner US military of the future would be agile, flexible and quickly deployable, ensuring worldwide presence through rotational deployments and creation of new partnerships. The US Navy's 60-40 "re-posturing" between the Pacific and the Atlantic would manifest itself in the allocation of six aircraft carriers, a majority of cruisers, destroyers, littoral combat ships, and submarines to this region.

    In the context of India, he marked it out as a country likely to play a "decisive role in shaping the security and prosperity of the 21st century world" and reaffirmed US interest in building a strong security relationship with it.

    In the other speech of note, delivered by Australian Defence Minister Stephen Smith, he pointed to the rise of China as a "defining element of Asia's growing influence", but observed that it should not be allowed to overshadow the rise of India. He pointed out that Australia's joining the Indian Ocean Naval Symposium (IONS) in 2008 constituted recognition of the growing strategic importance, not just of the Indian Ocean, but also of India.

    Smith drew attention to potential of the Indian Ocean Rim Association for Regional Cooperation (IOR-ARC), to deal with regional challenges, and emphasised his belief that India, Australia and Indonesia could jointly provide leadership through this forum, which reflects a natural extension of growing bilateral relationships between all three countries. Notable was the Minister's repeated use of the term the "Indo-Pacific" as well as his mention of the possibility of renaming the IOR-ARC as the "Indian Ocean Community".

    While acknowledging China as the key to a peaceful and secure Asia-Pacific, most speakers mentioned the tensions arising out of overlapping territorial and jurisdictional claims in the South China Sea. Calling for restraint, and for resolution of these disputes, in a manner consistent with international law, speakers rejected the use of threats, coercion or violence. The US national interest in exercising freedom of navigation and pursuing unimpeded commerce was highlighted, as was the oft-expressed hope that the country will join over 160 other nations in ratifying the Law of Seas Convention.

    India's Defence Minister A.K. Antony, in his relatively brief speech, confined himself to issues of a general nature such as freedom of the seas, India's maritime interests and the need for consensus-building to combat threats at sea. Making passing mention of the Indian Navy's role in anti-piracy operations, he expressed satisfaction at India's bilateral exchanges with a number of neighbouring countries.

    At this juncture when a West-to-East power shift is said to be under way, and India happens to be one of the two foci of intense geo-political interest in Asia, it would have been natural for participants of the SLD to expect, from a senior Indian politician, something in the nature of a broad policy articulation. Some areas of curiosity in our ASEAN neighbourhood are: how India views an emerging China; how India intends to use its growing economic and military strength; India's interests in the Indian Ocean and South China Sea; India's vision and aspirations for an Asian security order; and how will India's relations with the other major powers shape security governance in the region?

    When compared to the intellectually challenging and thought-provoking utterances of the other speakers, it is likely that the bland and anodyne content of Antony's speech would have disappointed his admirers and other delegates to the SLD. It is customary for cynical analysts to say that given the intensity of Indian politics and uncertainties inherent in coalition governments, India's political horizon remains clouded by domestic issues, and the vision of our statesmen extends only to the next session of parliament, or to the next general election.

    Be that as it may, unless we make a loud and clear articulation of India's interests, concerns, views and opinions in international forums such as the SLD, we might find that it is the USA, Australia, Indonesia - or even China - which lays down policies for us.
     
  16. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    India is bland because it has no strategic vision and flounders like a duck out of water.

    India finds its easier to sway like a coconut tree in a storm with such pious meanderings as 'judging the cases on merit', which means go with the wind.

    As the Punjabis say -Na Huqm na modna, na daka da torna (won't disobey the order, nor (lift a finger) take the effort to break a straw)!
     
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2012
  17. ejazr

    ejazr Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    I would respectfully disagree that there is no vision in the MEA and GoI. Whatever the merits of the "vision", I think they do have a well oiled bureaucracy and political machinery that has a vision.

    The problem is our Indian politicians are no where as articulate as their Western counterparts. And PR is certainly no their strong point. AK anotny's staff should have run through the most expected questions like India's position on China, on the SCS issue and so on and come up with some concrete points that Antony will say. Instead I was disappointing in the vague generalities that Antony mentioned not only in his speech but also in the Q&A session.

    You have to articulate the Indian position boldly but diplomatically so that others understand what India wants and considers its areas of interest. He should have talked about the IONS and the IOR-ARC initiatuve which was instead picked up by Australia. He should have stressed the importance of Indian Interests in the Persian Gulf region, East Africa and the ASEAN on top of the usual Indian subcontinent. And also articulated red lined regarding military naval and survelience activities in Indian EEZ for example and concerns around cyberwarfare which is becoming a serious issue as well.

    Our burecrats and army officers e.t.c. would probably have done a better job than Antony in the PR dept. IMHO
     

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