The PC: Suddenly, Surprisingly Alive

Discussion in 'Politics & Society' started by manindra, Nov 13, 2015.

  1. manindra

    manindra Regular Member

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    [​IMG]

    What you're looking at in the picture above is the $149 Intel Compute Stick. It's plugged into the HDMI port on the back of an HDTV. It comes loaded with Windows 10, an Atom processor, 2 gigabytes of memory, and 32 GB of storage with a Micro SD slot for expansion. It's a little bigger than a pack of gum.

    This, my friends, is Exhibit A in this year's edition of "Why the PC isn't dead."

    Much like the nine-lived cat and '60s TV Batman, the PC should be dead. The tablet was supposed to have killed it years ago. In 2010, after the launch of the iPad, Steve Jobs said that in the computing world of the future, PCs would be like trucks. They'd still be around, but few people would own them. The implication: tablets like the iPad might be the cars of the new computing world.

    Jobs was right, but not in the way most people thought. PCs are trucks, like, SUVs. Smartphones are the cars. Tablets, however, are bicycles: Most people buy one and use it for fun, but not for taking the kids to school, commuting to work, or helping a friend move. Unless you're a computing hipster, tablets aren't for the heavy lifting of productivity.

    PCs
    are trucks, like, SUVs. Smartphones are the cars. Tablets, however, are bicycles ....
    Case in point, look at some shipment numbers for the summer. Worldwide PC shipments were down 11% according to IDC, the market data firm. Not pretty, right? Well, look over at Apple, the world's biggest tablet maker. Over the summer, iPad shipments were down a whopping 20%. That's not new, either. As you can see in the chart below, iPad sales have been shrinking since the spring of 2014.

    [​IMG]

    Which brings us back to the personal computer. Apple CEO Tim Cook was quoted this week, ahead of the launch of the iPad Pro, dissing the PC:


    "I think if you’re looking at a PC, why would you buy a PC anymore? No really, why would you buy one?" he said to The Telegraph. "Yes, the iPad Pro is a replacement for a notebook or a desktop for many, many people. They will start using it and conclude they no longer need to use anything else, other than their phones."

    Not often that I say this, but: Wrong, Tim. I've been using an iPad as a primary computing device for the past two years. I started out doing it because I hoped it would work. The iPad is lighter, thinner, and simpler than a laptop. My wife started using one similarly. We both have bluetooth keyboards that we keep with the iPads at all times. For a lot of basic things, they work. More and more, though, they fail.

    They fail at anything beyond the most lightweight productivity tasks. For example, the version of the Safari browser in the iPad doesn't work with the web-based system my employer uses to show me my pay statement and access tax-related documents. It fails at handling LinkedIn's system for posting pieces like this one, especially when it comes to cropping and placing photos, and hitting the "publish" button. The iPad fails at ingesting and managing anything but the most basic photos and video from a GoPro camera. Spreadsheets are a better experience since Microsoft brought full Office to iOS, but they're still not as good as they are on a PC.

    And then there's the schoolwork. I have a second-grader who needs to access web-based services like XtraMath and Storia at home. They don't work correctly in the iPad's browser.

    For all these reasons, I'd been thinking about getting a computer later this year. That's when I found out about the latest Intel Compute Stick with Windows 10. For $150, plus $20 for a wireless USB mouse and keyboard, it succeeds at every task listed above where the iPad fails. And it does it with a lot less computing power under the hood. (It's not powerful enough to do serious photo editing or gaming, but it illuminates the potential of a sub-$500 PC.)

    So, a funny thing happened on the way to the morgue. Far from dead, the PC is evolving. A slew of touch-based devices out from Lenovo, HP, Dell, Acer, Microsoft, Intel and others are becoming like tablets a lot more quickly than iPads are becoming like PCs. And they're sometimes doing it at a fraction of the price.

    https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/pc-suddenly-surprisingly-alive-jon-fortt
     
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  3. prasadr14

    prasadr14 Regular Member

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    PC's would never be dead.
    Case 1 - Gaming.
    Try playing any modern game like Witcher 3 on a non-PC or even a high end Gaming laptop. And gaming industry is bigger than Hollywood.
    Case 2 - High end editing
    Ever tried to edit videos without a high end processer and graphics card? Good luck..

    As they say, the demise of PC is highly exaggerated.
     
  4. BATTLE FIELD

    BATTLE FIELD Battle Captain

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    i love my pc
    they will not die only the size and design will change.
     
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  5. Illusive

    Illusive Senior Member Senior Member

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    The normal day to day activities can be done in a tablet or phone, but not industrial level design work, heck even for students working in 3D field, tablets or even a laptop won't do cause it can go as far as photoshop(alienware is the exception), even video editing needs high ram. A normal workstation pc has 32gigs of RAM only :laugh:

    Then there is gaming. Mobile, tablet gaming is a joke. AAA games is demanding on power supply, gpu, cpu, memory both virtual and hard and most importantly to run these optimally, proper cooling is required. Try playing COD on touchscreen:rofl:. I think only Razer has come up with some solution, a damned expensive one though.
     
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  6. ezsasa

    ezsasa Senior Member Senior Member

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    I had tried an experiment to avoid using laptop for official purposes for about 6 months, replaced with iPad2 at that time.

    Results were not satisfactory. My findings at that time was that a physical keyboard and trackpad/mouse cannot be replaced. There is some convenience in using laptop with a physical keyboard and mouse.
     
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  7. Illusive

    Illusive Senior Member Senior Member

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    Depends on what kind of software you handle, touchscreen is convenient on small devices held in one hand. I find touchscreen useful for writing and drawing stuff with a s-pen. I use a Dell tablet pc venue11 pro with win10. If you're typing a lot then definitely keyboard and mouse. I tried posting with my tablet in DFI, i noticed selecting sentences and deleting them is very inconvenient.
     
  8. sabari

    sabari Regular Member

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    Does this
    Does this pocket computer can be use for playingd large 3d games like age of empire, battle cry,diablue,Warcraft etc
     
  9. manindra

    manindra Regular Member

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    No, but you can use it in all basic computing needs which you can't do in your Tab.
     

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