The Only Indian Fighter Pilot Ace to This Day

Discussion in 'Indian Air Force' started by shom, Apr 4, 2013.

  1. shom

    shom Regular Member

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    Indra Lal Roy:-
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    Indra Lal Roy (Bengali: ইন্দ্রলাল রায়), DFC (2 December 1898 – 22 July 1918) was the first Indian flying ace. He served in the First World War with the Royal Flying Corps and its successor, the Royal Air Force. He claimed five aircraft destroyed (including one shared), and five 'down out of control' wins (including another shared) in just over 170 hours flying time.[1]
    The son of Bengalis P. L. and Lolita Roy, he was born in Calcutta, where his father was Director of Public Prosecutions. When the First World War broke out, Roy was attending St Paul's School, Hammersmith in London, England.
    Five months after turning 18, in April 1917 he enlisted in the Royal Flying Corps and was commissioned as a second lieutenant on 5 July 1917. After training and gunnery practise at Vendôme and Turnberry, he joined No. 56 Squadron on 30 October 1917. Roy was part of "A" Flight, commanded by flying ace Captain Richard Maybery.
    Two months later, Roy was injured after he crash-landed his S.E.5a fighter on 6 December 1917. While recovering, Roy made numerous sketches of aircraft — many of which still exist. Though concerns were raised that he was medically unfit, Roy was successful in returning to duty after he had recuperated. He was transferred to Captain George McElroy's flight in No. 40 Squadron in June 1918.
    On his return to active service, Roy achieved ten victories (two shared) in thirteen days. His first was a Hannover over Drocourt[disambiguation needed] on 6 July 1918. This was followed by three victories in the space of four hours on 8 July 1918 (two Hannover Cs and a Fokker D.VII); two on 13 July 1918 (a Hannover C and a Pfalz D.III); two on 15 July 1918 (two Fokker D.VIIs); and one on 18 July 1918 (a DFW C.V). Roy's final victory came the following day when he shot down a Hannover C over Cagnicourt. He is the first and only Indian flying air ace to this day.[citation needed]
    He was killed over Carvin on 22 July 1918 while flying in formation with two other S.E.5a in a dog fight against Fokker D.VIIs of Jagdstaffel 29. Roy was posthumously awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross (DFC) in September 1918 for his actions during the period of 6–19 July 1918. He is buried at Estevelles Communal Cemetery.
    His nephew Subroto Mukerjee too was a fighter pilot who later became the first Indian Chief of Air staff of the Indian Air Force.
    Victories - all in an S.E.5a (B180)[2]
    Date and time Opponent
    OOC = out of control
    DES = destroyed Location Comments
    6 July 1918, 0545 Hannover C (OOC) Drocourt
    8 July 1918, 0645 Hannover C (OOC) Drocourt
    8 July 1918, 0925 Hannover C (OOC) East of Monchy Shared with Capt. George McElroy and Lt. Gilbert Strange
    8 July 1918, 1025 Fokker D.VII (OOC) South-east of Douai
    13 July 1918, 0645 Hannover C (DES) West of Estaires Shared with Capt. George McElroy, Lt. Gilbert Strange, and Lt. F.H. Knobel (D3528[clarification needed])
    13 July 1918, 2005 Pfalz D.III (DES) Vitry-Brebières
    15 July 1918, 2005 Fokker D.VII (DES Hulloch
    15 July 1918, 2005 Fokker D.VII (OOC) Hulloch
    18 July 1918, 2040 DFW C.V (DES) South-east of Arras
    19 July 1918, 1025 Hannover C (DES) Cagnicourt
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    The S.E.5a
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    Stamp Issued by Government of India
     
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  3. W.G.Ewald

    W.G.Ewald Defence Professionals/ DFI member of 2 Defence Professionals

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    Royal Aircraft Factory S.E.5 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Comment on photo above:

     
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  4. mikhail

    mikhail Senior Member Senior Member

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    we Indians should be proud of this man who is nothing but a legend to us!respect for this brave pilot who also happened to the only Bengali RAF pilot to be awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross.
     
  5. W.G.Ewald

    W.G.Ewald Defence Professionals/ DFI member of 2 Defence Professionals

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    Flying the SE.5a | The Vintage Aviator
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  6. W.G.Ewald

    W.G.Ewald Defence Professionals/ DFI member of 2 Defence Professionals

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  7. W.G.Ewald

    W.G.Ewald Defence Professionals/ DFI member of 2 Defence Professionals

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  8. Snuggy321

    Snuggy321 Regular Member

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    Who was the 2end highest scoring Indian pilot???
     
  9. shom

    shom Regular Member

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    No idea ,,, only DFI veterans can give an idea,,, let me get some help ... @Kunal Biswas da, @Ray sir,, @Daredevil sir please enlight us in this regard,,,,
     
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  10. shom

    shom Regular Member

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    List of Flying Aces in WW1 from India:-
    Captain Lawrence Percival Coombes garnered 15 aerial victories as a Sopwith Camel pilot for the Royal Naval Air Service and the Royal Air Force[1][2]
    Captain Edward Dawson Atkinson was credited with 10 aerial victories in two combat tours, one while flying a Nieuport and another flying a Royal Aircraft Factory SE.5a[3]
    Captain Indra Lal Roy was credited with 10 aerial victories while piloting a Royal Aircraft Factory S.E.5a in No. 40 Squadron RFC[4][5][6]
    Captain (later Group Captain) Arthur Peck of No. 111 Squadron RFC was credited with eight aerial victories.[7]
    Captain Douglas Carbery scored six confirmed aerial victories while serving as an aerial observer in various squadrons
    Lieutenant Thomas Cecil Silwood Tuffield had six aerial victories confirmed while flying as an observer in 48 Squadron's Bristol F.2 Fighters[8]
    Captain George M. Cox scored five aerial victories as a Sopwith Camel pilot for No. 65 Squadron RAF.[9]
     
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  11. shom

    shom Regular Member

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  12. shom

    shom Regular Member

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    Hardit Singh Malik::-


    Hardit Singh Malik was born on 22nd November 1894. Hardutt Singh Malik became the first Indian to fly into combat with the Royal Flying Corps. Indeed it was he who made it possible for Indians to commission into the RFC. Malik was still a student at Oxford when the War broke out in 1914. After finishing his studies he decided to try and sign up for the RFC like many of his friends. Malik was unfortunately denied a commission by the RFC. So Malik decided to approach the French Air Corps instead, who responded favorably. Malik's tutor at Oxford thought is absolutely scandalous that the RFC should refuse commission to a subject of the Empire while the French were willing to oblige. He took it upon himself to write to General Henderson, a friend and then head of the RFC, pleading Malik's case. As a result Malik was offered a cadetship with the RFC. He reported to No.1 Armament School on 5th April 1917, and was commissioned into No.26 Squadron on 22nd June 1917.
    Malik's days with No.62 Squadron were relatively uneventful. It was not until he transferred to No.28 Squadron that Malik went into action. Malik was fortunate in having as his flight commander none other than the Canadian ace Major William Barker VC. Malik saw plenty of action over France and Italy during the winter of 1917. During this period Malik notched up two kills. He was also quite lucky to get away with a few bullet wounds in his right leg in the midst of this intense Malik became the only Indian aviator to survive the First World War. After the war he joined the Indian Civil Service and later the Indian Foreign Service. Malik eventually served as Indian Ambassador to France. And as long as he lived Malik proudly carried the remnants of the bullets firmly embedded in his leg. Salute to Khalsa Warrior Sardar Hardutt Singh ji.
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    Photo and image Courtesy:- http://www.sikhiwiki.org
     
  13. shom

    shom Regular Member

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    Lt Shri Krishna Welinkar, 23 Sqn.:- From Bombay aged 23. shot down 27 June 1918 in Dolphin D3691 by Fritz Rumey and DoW 30 June 1918 Buried Hargard, France.

    Fritz Rumey - The Aerodrome - Aces and Aircraft of World War I

    Name: WELINKAR, SHRI KRISHNA CHANDA
    Initials: S K C
    Nationality: United Kingdom
    Rank: Lieutenant
    Regiment/Service: Royal Air Force
    Unit Text: 23rd Sqdn.
    Age: 23
    Date of Death: 30/06/1918
    Additional information: Son of Mrs. Lakshmibai B. Welinkar, of Ridge Rd., Shri Krishna Niwas, Bombay, India.
    Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
    Grave/Memorial Reference: III. J. 1.
    Cemetery: HANGARD COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION.Lt. Shrikrishna Chanda Welingkar, was a brave man who sustained wounds in action on June 27, 1918 and died three days later on June 30, 1918. During his service, he was awarded the Military Cross. His death in action is commemorated at the Hangard Communal Cemetery Extension, at Somme, France.

    Courtesy:- Militarian.com
    Couldnt find any image of him.
     
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  14. Snuggy321

    Snuggy321 Regular Member

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    Got some questions:
    During WW2:
    What kind of tasks was the RIAF performing during the war? And where they used directly at the frontline or rather in the rear...

    And more importantly, what about the enemy (mainly Japanese forces) they were fighting?

    PS: All these question came into my mind after reading about Flg Off Jagadish Chandra Verma, who scored the only air to air victory during WW2
     
  15. shom

    shom Regular Member

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    And more importantly, what about the enemy (mainly Japanese forces) they were fighting?
    You will get to know every thing here.Easy to search in internet. There are many websites discussing the role of RIAF in Worl war 2
    Indian Air Force :: The Royal Indian Air Force in the Second World War
     
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  16. W.G.Ewald

    W.G.Ewald Defence Professionals/ DFI member of 2 Defence Professionals

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    Last edited: Sep 1, 2013
  17. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Wg cdr K K Majumdar DFC [No 1 Sq-1st Burma campaigne/RIAF-1555GD(P)] received his DFC from Field Marshal Sir Claude Auchinleck[Nov'42].Two unescorted attack he led to Thiland enemy airfields and with army support he attacked Tennasserim.Many valuable reconnaissances missions he completed successfully with his Hurricane IIc[Rangoon-Prome]before gunned down by the enemy-artillery[Feb '45].

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    Sq. Leader M S Pujji[No 4 Sq//1604 GD(P)] flied Hurricanes ['40 & onwards]to protect coastal convoys alongwith intercepting Luftwaffe bomber fighters when Hitler ordered the bombing of London in the Blitz.He survived several crashes and flew several combat missions throughout the war and extended from Britain,France ,Belgium, North Africa['41 to face Rommel-he gunned down there and British soldiers pulled him out from wreck], Middle-East and upto Burma.

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    [Photo-RAF Museum-Cosford]
    One Messerschmitt Me 109 gunned down him in dog fight at Dover.During his Burma combat against the Japs,he own DFC.

    W1 ace Indra Lal Roy
    I L Roy[2nd Lieutenant July'17-RFC] , the 1st Indian ace of RFC achieved 10 kills before his death.He assigned to G McElroy's 40 Sq. too,scored 10 kills between 6-19 July[including 3 in a day].

    Lieutenant Roy joined 56 Sq and posted to France. Once he gunned down here during dogfight with Germans and landed at No Mans Land zone of British-German line in France British Army men sent him to army hospital.He was unconscious due to his fatal injury.There he declaired dead and sent him to mortuary.Miraculously he gained his consciousness and returned to bed for treatment.

    Again,after recovery,he joined No 40 Sq and sent to France for combat mission.His service span was too short,but his achievements were not.During his last dogfight with German Fokker D VII[JASTA-29],he shot down in flames over Carvin. His combat mission ended here but achieved his DFC posthumously[July '18].

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    Sqn Ldr Arjan Singh DFC [No 1 Sq-1st Burma campaigne/RIAF-1555GD(P)]

    Arjan Singh's two operational tenures on the Burma Front during World War II—the first as a Pilot Officer with No.1 Squadron ("Tigers") and subsequently in 1944, as Commander of the same Squadron, were outstanding. His brilliant,couragious flying career finally decorated by Lord Louis Mountbatten,the then Supreme Allied Commander/South East Asia. The event was commemorated at the airfield itself.

    Addressing the Squadron while standing on the wing of Squadron Leader Arjan Singh’s Hurricane,pinned the DFC on his chest.''

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    Indian DFCs In RFC/RAF -W1 & 2 | Military History Forum
     
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  18. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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  19. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Wing Commander Karun Krishna Majumdar DFC and Bar

    Wg. Cdr. Karun Krishna Majumdar, gave the fledgling Indian Air Force its first war hero in World War 2. A born leader, and a daredevil of a pilot, somewhat reckless to his friends, Majumdar was the only pilot in the IAF to be decorated with a Bar to the DFC. Majumdar would have been destined to reach the topmost position in the Indian Air Force, that of the Chief of Air Staff, if fate has not decided to intervene.

    Majumdar, popularly called as "Jumbo" started his flying career after training at RAF Cranwell. On commissioning he joined No.1 Squadron as Flying Officer in the Mid 1930s. Flying a variety of aircraft, first the Wapiti, then on to the Hart. He was quickly identified as leadership potential and very soon was put as Flight Commander of 'C' Flight of the No.1 Squadron. Promoted to Squadron Leader, Majumdar took over command of the No.1 Squadron in June 1941, when it was based at Miranshah, NWFP. The squadron after its conversion to Westland Lysanders in August 1941 was moved to Drigh Road for training. At the onset of the hostilities after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbour and Malaya, Jumbo Majumdar and his command were put to test immediately. The No.1 IAF Squadron was posted to Burma.

    The Squadron was reached Toungoo airfield on 1 Feb 1942. The Japanese Air Force attacked Toungoo the very next day, destroying allied airfield installation and aircraft, only the No.1 Squadrons aircraft were unscathed. Majumdar immediately planned a retaliatory raid on the Japanese airfield at Mae-Haungsan, from where the attackers took off. Even though the Lysander was an Army Cooperation type, its employement in offensive bombing missions was unheard off.

    The next day, when Majumdar took off in a solitary Lysander armed with two 250 lbs. bombs, the New Zealanders of the No.67 RAF Squadron which was sharing Toungoo, in sheer admiration and respect for this young Indian who was taking on the Japanese, sent an escort of two Buffalo fighters to the Lysander. Majumdar flew at low level, almost skimming tree tops to achieve complete surprise at the Japanese airfield. He dropped his bombs with unerring accuracy on a aircraft hanger at the airfield, destroying it as well as the aircraft in the hanger.

    The very next day, Majumdar was in the thick of the action again, this time he led the whole squadron on a bombing mission on the airfield, destroying several buildings, wireless installations and aircraft on the ground. These lumbering Lysanders would have been no match to the Japanese Zeros and Oscars. But it was the Indian Pilots courage and skills that made them take such risks. From then till the fall of Rangoon in April, the Lysanders provided close air support work for the Army. Finally withdrawing after handing over their Lysanders to the Burmese Air Force.

    Jumbo was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross (DFC) for his leadership of the squadron during the Burma Campaign. Thus becoming the first Indian Officer to be so decorated during World War 2. After spending two years in India in various staff and flying assignments, Majumdar returned to the front. Now a Wing Commander, he volunteered for a posting to No.268 RAF Squadron flying Spitfires during the allied invasion of Europe. His role in reconnoitering the Falise-Gap sector and other areas earned him further laurels.

    On his return from Europe, Majumdar was awarded a Bar to his DFC in January 1945, again the first and the only Indian to be so decorated. He then participated in the Indian Air Force Display Flight, and toured the country conducting aerobatic shows and displays to attract and bring to the public notice, the Indian Air Force's exploits. The aerobatic sessions were much demanding on the pilots, which required plenty of practice flying and rehearsal sessions.

    It was on 17 February 1945, Majumdar decided to do an aerobatic practice sortie in a Hawker Hurricane. The aircraft he chose had a previous history of snags and problems, and disregarding the advice of his friend and compatriot, Fg. Off. Harjinder Singh, (later AVM), Majumdar took to the skies in the Hurricane. In the midst of the aerobatic routines which involved a dive, one of the undercarriage legs, unlocked itself from the wheel well and deployed down, upsetting the aircraft's stability. The Hurricane stalled and crashed headlong into the ground, killing Majumdar instantaneously. Majumdar died as he wanted to live, carefree, daring and at the controls doing what he wanted to, fly to his heart's content.

    Indian Air Force :: Wing Commander Karun Krishna Majumdar
     
  20. ramakrishna

    ramakrishna Regular Member

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  21. Waffen SS

    Waffen SS New Member

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    @RamKrishna, @Ray, @shom, @mikhail, Please stop taking pride on them, they were serving British Government thus indirectly helping British Government to kill innocent Indians, why should we take pride for them? They did nothing to India, serving british Government means to help them to their plunder and racial hatred to Indians?

    Dont we have minimum self-respect that we honour those betrayers who helped a Foreign colonial Government that was killing their own country men??? To me those soldiers who mutinied in Singapore in 1915 are true Heros.

    What the heck the so called British-Indian army or Royal Indian air force or navy did for Indian people? Why should we simultaneously honour both slaves of British who were dedicated to help British to starve out Indians and our freedom fighters fighting for our our liberty? It is hypocrisy. Please stop it.

    No matter they are Indian or nor, at first to honour them we need to see that they really help humanity or India?

    These pilots fighting for British helped to defeat Germans, enemy's enemy is our friend thus delaying our freedom. What ever they did not for India, they did it to british imperialism.

    You guys forgot how British gave their gratitudeness to India's contribution after WW1? Jailianwalabagh massacre, Qissa Khawani massacre.

    Qissa Khwani Bazaar massacre - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    To me NirmalJit Singh Sekhon is hero, the only Indian Air force member to receive Param Vir Chakra.

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    Taken from Bharat Rakshak.

    On 14th december, Srinagar air field was attacked by 6 Pak F 86 Sabers among them 4 armed with armed with 2 500 Pound bombs. He was the only pilot to took off under heavy attack, his plane was Folland Gnat, in dog fight he scored a hit on a Saber and set another ablaze, before being shot down, it is not known where his plane went down.

    He is the only air force member to receive Param Vir Chakra till present day.:salute:
     
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