the M-MRCA Resource pool thread

Discussion in 'Indian Air Force' started by F-14, Jun 29, 2009.

  1. F-14

    F-14 Global Defence Moderator Senior Member

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    Compitators ​



    F-16 Fighting Falcon (Lockheed, USA).

    JAS-39 Gripen (Saab, Sweden; marketed by Britain’s BAE).

    MiG-35 (Rosonboronexport, Russia).

    Eurofighter Typhoon (EADS/BAE, Europe & Britain).

    F/A-18 E/F Super Hornet (Boeing, USA).

    Rafale (Dassault, France).



    Advantages and disadvantages

    F-16 Fighting Falcon (Lockheed, USA).

    Advantage

    Disadvantage


    JAS-39 Gripen (Saab, Sweden; marketed by Britain’s BAE).



    Advantage


    Disadvantage



    MiG-35 (Rosonboronexport, Russia).

    Advantage



    Disadvantage



    Eurofighter Typhoon (EADS/BAE, Europe & Britain).


    Advantage


    Disadvantage


    F/A-18 E/F Super Hornet (Boeing, USA).

    Advantage

    Disadvantage



    Rafale (Dassault, France).

    Advantage

    Disadvantage

    http://www.defenseindustrydaily.com...ndias-mrca-fighter-competition-changes-01989/
     
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  3. F-14

    F-14 Global Defence Moderator Senior Member

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    http://www.f-16.net/news_article3577.html

     
  4. Sridhar

    Sridhar House keeper Moderator

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    Tuesday, June 30, 2009
    MMRCA Part 2 - The Swedish Underdog

    [​IMG]
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    [​IMG]



    Saab's tagline for the Gripen India campaign ("The Independent Choice") tells you a great deal about the depth of recognition by the company that the competition will most definitely be decided on political lines. Politically, the Gripen is squarely the odds-on underdog in the competition. The fact that it is an "independent choice" hasn't impressed an establishment that refuses to budge from the perception that the purchase of 126 fighters is as much a definitive politico-strategic investment as it is the topping up of depleting squadron strength of the IAF. This is not unreasonable, and even IAF pilots believe that the MMRCA contract is a chance to change a lot of things. Some view the Gripen's marketing as defensive, almost yielding too much to the overwhelming perception that India will buy American. But the aircraft itself has a great deal going for it.

    STRENGTHS

    Apart from the fact that is undoubtedly an excellent airplane, ironically, the Gripen's biggest play is the fact that it is a relatively independent choice. Within the government, many believe the Gripen is a safe bet at a good price, and one that (like the F-16), fits in with what the IAF had originally asked for. There also exists a belief within the government that the people at Saab have pioneered and fast-tracked the Demo NG programme principally for the MMRCA programme, and taken this to mean a level of commitment. The IAF has also received and been impressed by independent testimonials from the air forces of Hungary and Czech Republic about turnaround and ownership costs of the Gripen C/D. The IAF is also quite impressed with the Gripen's permutation configuration of systems, sensors and avionics, not to mention a quantum leap in the computer/bus (including Link 16), GCAS, satellite comms, payload capacity and EWS between the Gripen C/D and the Gripen NG. The IAF also likes the very nifty Cobra helmet mounted display system. The Gripen's pitch that it can be turned around on the ground (engine, systems) the fastest among all contenders makes it perfect for the IAF. The Gripen team has also squarely pitched the airplane as the a perfect complement to the "big-hitter" Su-30MKIs, implying that India's growing Flanker fleet could be inadvertently rendered superfluous if the heavy contenders in the MMRCA -- the F/A-18, the Typhoon or the Rafale -- were chosen for induction.

    WEAKNESSES

    Unfortunately, the Gripen's weaknesses are many. The biggest, I've outlined in the intro. The fact that is provides no strategic fruits is a big downer. The fact that Sweden promises not to interfere, but rather provide full autonomy to the Gripen India programme is simply too little in the Indian context. In fact, there are senior officers in the IAF who believe that Saab flatters itself in the belief that Sweden is powerful enough to fiddle with the strategic/military autonomy of a country like India, especially since the MMRCA provides for a total transfer of technology that very nearly precludes the possibility of any meaningful interference post-contract. Another weakness is the aircraft's country of origin itself. Provided that the Saab proves to be the best aircraft in the field evaluation tests (FETs) -- which it well might -- will any Indian government, let alone the Congress -- have the guts to buy Swedish ever again? If anyone has any doubts about the Bofors ghost, cast a glance at the farcical joke being played in the Indian Army's efforts to purchase 400 towed 155-mm artillery guns. It's been on since 2003, with an unprecedented four trial rounds. The final results laid out that the SWS Bofors gun was on top throughout. At the last moment, then Army chief General JJ Singh gave in to a firm political warning and called for a re-tender of the entire competition. It probably speaks volumes that he's now the politically-appointed Governor of Arunachal Pradesh. A stunned Bofors still hasn't recovered from the shock. Saab, which close links with the Bofors company, knows just what a liability being from Sweden is forever more in India. Worse, there's no sidestepping it. Worse still, even the IAF recognises that. The tragedy is, of course, that the Gripen has absolutely nothing to do with Bofors.

    LiveFist: MMRCA Part 2 - The Swedish Underdog
     
  5. F-14

    F-14 Global Defence Moderator Senior Member

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    Boeing: Boeing Receives Contract to Develop, Test Distributed Targeting for F/A-18E/F Super Hornet

     
  6. John

    John Guest

    Boeing's Super Hornet seeks export sale to launch 20% thrust upgrade

    By Stephen Trimble

    Boeing is seeking an international launch customer for a 20% higher thrust version of the General Electric F414 turbofan that powers the F/A-18E/F Super Hornet.

    The F414 enhanced performance engine (EPE) includes an all new core and forward fan to dramatically increase the fighter's takeoff performance, said Bob Gower, Boeing vice president for F/A-18E/F.

    The improvements would increase the F414 thrust rating from 22,000lbs to 26,600lbs. The baseline F414-GE-400, which also powers the Saab Gripen demonstration aircraft, is itself a 35% higher thrust version of the F404 and entered service with the Super Hornet fleet in 1998.

    More recently, the US Navy, Boeing and GE have been developing durability improvements to reduce foreign object damage and specific fuel consumption, Gower told reporters participating in a Boeing media tour.

    While the USN seeks a new engine core to make the F414 more durable, some international customers are interested in a new engine fan that enables higher thrust, Gower said.

    The 'enhanced durability engine' becomes the 'enhanced performance engine' when you put the fan on it," Gower said.

    Although the core enhancements are already under contract with the USN, the programme is seeking an export customer to launch development of the F414 EPE, Gower said.

    The international order would lead to follow-on sales for the USN, which would gradually replace its current inventory with the improved version, Gower said.

    Several countries, including India, Brazil, Denmark, Greece and Kuwait, are considering the F/A-18E/F, with the Royal Australian Air Force already signed on as the first export customer. The RAAF has ordered 24 F/A-18E/Fs, including 12 provisioned to become EA-18G Growlers.

    The improved thrust would likely be most welcomed among militaries operating in hot weather, which reduces engine performance especially at a takeoff.

    Despite the dramatic thrust increase, the EPE would not require enlarging the F/A-18E/F's engine inlets to enable increased air flow, Gower said.

    "We are not modifying the mould line of the aircraft," Gower said. "The current inlet gives us enough [air] in-take."

    Gower also said the EPE would require changing the number of compressor stages, but he did not elaborate.

    The USN is also planning to steadily improve the F/A-18E/Fs sensors, electronic warfare system, connectivity and weapons load-out over the next decade, Gower said.

    "The US government and Boeing and our suppliers," said Gower, "continue to invest in the platform because we see opportunities both domestically and internationally for the platform."

    Boeing's Super Hornet seeks export sale to launch 20% thrust upgrade

    With the new engines the overall thrust output will increase from 44,000 lbs to 53,200 lbs.
     
  7. F-14

    F-14 Global Defence Moderator Senior Member

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    Rafale Multi-Role Combat Fighter - Air Force Technology

    http://www.dassault-aviation.com/en/defense/rafale/omnirole-by-design.html?L=1




     
  8. Soham

    Soham DFI TEAM Senior Member

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  9. Soham

    Soham DFI TEAM Senior Member

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  10. Soham

    Soham DFI TEAM Senior Member

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    Rafale Self protection.
    [​IMG]
     
  11. Soham

    Soham DFI TEAM Senior Member

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    Especially for supersonic compression, the engine compressor needs to hit a SUBSONIC airflow so anything supersonic have to be slowed down by mean of creating shocks.

    [​IMG]
     
  12. Soham

    Soham DFI TEAM Senior Member

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    Rafale Cost control measures
    [​IMG]
     
  13. Soham

    Soham DFI TEAM Senior Member

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    Rafale's advantages.

    [​IMG]
     
  14. Soham

    Soham DFI TEAM Senior Member

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    Rafale : Payload options.

    [​IMG]
     
  15. Soham

    Soham DFI TEAM Senior Member

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    Low operating costs.

    © Dassault Aviation – F. Robineau
    Mission-ready with low operating costs
    RAFALE supportability and mission readiness capitalise on the undisputed track record of the current generation of French fighters such as the combat-proven Mirage 2000.

    From the early beginning of the development phase, French MOD assigned very stringent Integrated Logistic Support requirements on RAFALE programme, well exceeding the prowess of Mirage 2000. Through concurrent engineering and Computer Aided Design (CAD) techniques, the best technological choices were made in order to favour reliability, accessibility and maintainability.

    These extensive ILS studies, together with bold technological choices, led to supportability features exceeding the preliminary requirements:

    Strengthened by more than 20 years experience of integrated testability through Mirage and Atlantic programme, RAFALE features a comprehensive and accurate Integrated Testability covering all aircraft systems and allowing Printed Circuit Boards exchange at flight line: Testability targets call for a 95 percent fault detection, plus the ability to detect all safety-critical failures,
    Ergonomic (CAD) studies were conducted in order to check for main components accessibility within aircraft bays, ensuring that all flight line operations would be swift and error free, yielding very short repair times,
    A unique (automatic) centralised weaponry safety system gets rid of all safety pins and end-of-runway actions, and contributes to achieve outstanding Turn Around Time in operation,
    Advanced manufacturing techniques together with CAD uses eliminate long conventional boresighting operations after gun, HUD or radar exchange.
    All these maintainability aspects have been thoroughly assessed and validated by French Navy and French Air force users. RAFALE is already well in service and enjoys from day one a very high availability and sortie rate (close to 300 FH/year/aircraft) in the confined and stringent aircraft carrier environment.

    For self-supportability, the RAFALE is designed to require the minimum of ground support equipment: it is equipped with an on-board oxygen generation system, and with a closed-loop cooling fluid system for on-board coolanol and nitrogen circuits. The built-in Auxiliary Power Unit provides electrical power until the engine-driven generators come on line. During exercise "Trident d'Or", French Naval Aviators validated the RAFALE hot refuelling procedure.

    Affordable high-tech fighter
    A reliable and easily maintainable fighter invariably translates into considerably lower maintenance costs:

    There is no complete airframe or engine depot level inspection required throughout the aircraft service life, and only specific components such as Shop Replaceable Units (SRUs) are returned for maintenance/repair. The same philosophy applies to the M88 turbofan composed of 21 modules, interchangeable without needing full balancing and re-calibration. For maintenance and repair, only modules or parts are returned to the depot/manufacturer.
    The decision to eliminate the complex systems from the early design phase (a fixed refuelling probe, but removable, fixed air intake, no airbrake, no constant speed drive due to variable frequency,...) ensures spare, maintenance man hours and support equipment reduction. Also, the full interchangeability between elements due to the mastering of manufacturing techniques (no need of fitting during element installation, no boresighting) along with standardisation approach during design (reduced number of screw types, interchangeability between left-hand and right-had foreplanes, servo-actuators, standardisation of electronic modules,...) induce a reduction in spares inventory. Similarly, changing, at flight-line level, printed circuit boards within a LRU instead of replacing the LRU itself lessens the need for complete spare units (radar, SPECTRA, modular computers).
    The fighter needs reduced ground manning levels (30 percent gain compared with the Mirage 2000), and lowered personnel training requirements. For instance, the side-opening canopy facilitates ejection-seat removal (ex: 10 min, 2 men for a seat exchange).
    Logistic footprint reduction results from the elimination of heavy external means required with conventional aircraft. For example, no flight-line external tester is now required due to the extensive use of integrated testability. Also the elimination of engine run-up test cell is a unique achievement.
    Experience of maritime design with Atlantic MPA and Super-Etendard carrier-based fighter benefit to the RAFALE advanced corrosion protection.
    Finally, maintenance monitoring concept results to a limited scheduled maintenance plan. Throughout its life, the aircraft will never leave its Operational Base for maintenance reasons.
     
  16. Soham

    Soham DFI TEAM Senior Member

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    A good detailed read.

    [​IMG]
     
  17. Soham

    Soham DFI TEAM Senior Member

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    Rafale Converted Into A Satellite Launcher

    November 5, 2008: Following the example of Russia and the United States, France plans to use its Rafale fighter to launch small, low orbit, satellites. The ten ton launcher would be hung from three of the Rafales hard points (one on the fuselage and two on the wings), and be able to put a 300 pound satellite into an 800 kilometers orbit.

    The U.S. and Russia pioneered this sort of thing three decades ago. Russia developed an ASAT (Anti-Satellite Missile), in response to the United States program that actually resulted in the destruction of a low flying (555 kilometers up) satellite. Russia has since revised this system to launch low flying satellites using Su-30s fighters or Tu-22m bombers.

    The United States ASAT program used a specially equipped F-15 to zoom to a high altitude, and launch a 1.2 ton ASM-135A missile, which then homed in on the satellite and destroyed it. The missile had two stages, plus a homing warhead. Development began in 1977. The first, and only, live test took place in 1985, when a worn out communications satellite was destroyed by the missile. Shortly thereafter, Congress shut down the program, believing that ASAT violated treaties regarding the military use of space. This did not discourage the Russians, who began working on their own ASAT after the U.S. program was cancelled. Progress on the Russian ASAT was kept secret, although it was known (or believed) to exist.

    When the Soviet Union collapsed in 1991, many previously secret Russian weapons projects were revealed, if only briefly, and often in little detail. One of them was the Russian ASAT. Now, the Kazcosmos company, in Kazakhstan, which developed the Russian ASAT (in cooperation with a Moscow based research institute), is putting together a satellite launching operation. The Russian ASAT used a MiG-31 recon aircraft to test launch the missile. Such a system can only launch small satellite (no more than a few hundred pounds.) But such "microsats" have become quite popular, due to cheaper and more effective miniature electronics. Many regular satellite launches now include one or more microsats as part of a multi satellite package.
     
  18. Soham

    Soham DFI TEAM Senior Member

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  19. Soham

    Soham DFI TEAM Senior Member

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    Here is a snap of a hoarding of a bus-stop in Delhi.
    Desperate campaigning.. don't you think ? :D

    [​IMG]
     
  20. Soham

    Soham DFI TEAM Senior Member

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    Specs about the contenders
    (I had posted these on IDF and NDR, and they were appreciated so I thought my might as well post 'em here)

    Rafale

    Rafale optimisation is not a vain word or empty commercial argument.

    The aircraft aerodynamic is way more developed than that of the previous design, the Rafale A.

    After Rafale A flew first on 4th July 1986, it served its purpose as demonstrator, validating the close-coupled delta-canard formula.

    In particular, it meet all of ACX requierements for high maneuvrability and STOL performances, climb rate, sustain dash speed etc.

    The proposed Navalised version, ACM was to meet more stringuent requierement from Marine Nationale after a Carrier trial period:

    Increased sink rate with a 16* AoA and better downward visibility than the A were among MN demands after Carrier trials.

    Design have to evoluate further and Dassault designers didn't do things half-way.

    [​IMG]

    The A wings were similar to that of the Mirage IIING, a crancked delta plan which allowed the A to sustain M 2.0 and provided with good qualities at high AoA.
     
  21. Soham

    Soham DFI TEAM Senior Member

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    [​IMG]

    In some instances (as in the case for the EAP), this wingplan can lead to assymetric dispacement of Cl at supersonic speed, the center of lift of the two parts of the wings moving back backward at a different rate. (It depends on wingsweep).

    There were also gains to be made by repositioning the wings from low-shoulder to mid-fuelage and this unlocked several other design options starting with a reduction in wave drag:

    [​IMG]

    1) This allowed the designers to give the aircraft a sharply sweept LEX which not only gives an increae in lift but also is shaped for supersonic performances.

    2) The surfaces of the canard was increeased by 30* and their root shaped so that they can deflect fully at 30* and increase the effect of the deflected airflow above the wing.

    3) The LEX leading edge were designed sharper with a tri-dimentional shape, a constant sweept and progressive adrenal

    [​IMG]

    The LEX are rooted at the point where the inlets diffuser shock hits the inlet leading edge, and beneficiate from the same weaker shock wave which triggers their own while minimising its intensity.

    At lower speeds they provoc several vortexes, one of which is clearly visible here, resulting on a significant increase in lift.

    4) There was a marqued increase in wing-fuselage junction volume too, with a more blended shape which reduces wave drag and increases internal fuel volume.

    Accessorly this feature is also reducing the aircraft RCS.

    While this would have been more than enough for most design houses, it wasn't so for the Dassault aerodynamicians.

    During the Mirage 4000 flight-tests, they notices that the nose cone and front fuselage could be used to accomodate better pressure control and increase overal aerodynamic efficiency around the inlets.

    This resulted in the characteristic V-shaped fron fuselage and inlet arrangement which optimises the airflow in front of the diffusers

    This arrangement allows for a higher supersonic performances and a less complex inlet design.

    But AGAIN this wasn't enough for Dassault, when they were given the word "OPTIMISEZ"!!!

    Using their experience on the Mirage series they developed the conceipt of pressure and wave control even further:

    Using the principes of compressive and expensive waves they channeled the boundary layer to the exact point where they wanted these phenomenons to occur: At the limit of the wing root.

    There are sdeveral advantages in doing so:

    First they do away with the Mirage 2000 strakes, as they are notably unstealthy and offers less control over the boundary layer.

    These are normaly rooted at shoulder-level and dynamises the airflow around the fin at high AoA offering increased Yaw stability.

    In the case of Rafale, by shaping the inlets in a V, they made it possible to energise BOTH that of the wing at its root and the fin's simultaneously, retain a sleek aircaft and low RCS.
     

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