The great game: Myanmar bombed China

Discussion in 'China' started by Samar Rathi, Mar 14, 2015.

  1. Samar Rathi

    Samar Rathi Regular Member

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    China lodges solemn representations after 4 nationals killed by Myanmar bomb - Xinhua | English.news.cn

    China lodges solemn representations after 4 nationals killed by Myanmar bomb


    BEIJING, March 13 (Xinhua) -- Chinese Vice Foreign Minister Liu Zhenmin summoned Myanmar ambassador Thit Linn Ohn in Beijing Friday night, lodging solemn representations to him after four Chinese people were killed by a bomb dropped by a Myanmar warplane in southwestern Yunnan Province.

    The bomb hit a sugarcane field in the border city of Lincang and killed four people working there on Friday afternoon. Nine others were also injured.

    Earlier this week, the Chinese foreign ministry said that stray fire from a fight that occurred on Sunday between Myanmar's government forces and a local ethnic army had damaged a house in China.

    On Friday, Liu condemned the incident in the sugarcane field and urged the Myanmar side to thoroughly investigate the case and inform the Chinese side of the result.

    He also urged the Myanmar side to punish the perpetrator, appropriately handle the aftermath, and take immediate and effective measures to prevent recurrence of such incidents and safeguard the security and stability in the border areas between China and Myanmar.

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    Last edited: Mar 14, 2015
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  3. Samar Rathi

    Samar Rathi Regular Member

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    China deploys fighter jets along tense Myanmar border

    Beijing: The Sino-Myanmar border turned tense on Saturday as China deployed fighter jets after lodging a strong diplomatic protest with its neighbour following the death of four Chinese when a Myanmarese warplane reportedly dropped a bomb in southwestern Yunnan province.

    Chinese Vice Foreign Minister Liu Zhenmin summoned Myanmar ambassador Thit Linn Ohn in Beijing last night, lodging solemn representations after the four Chinese were killed.

    The bomb hit a sugarcane field in the border city of Lincang and killed four people working there yesterday. Nine others were also injured, state-run Xinhua news reported.

    Earlier this week, the Chinese foreign ministry said that stray fire from a fight that occurred on Sunday between Myanmar's government forces and a local ethnic army had damaged a house in China.

    Liu condemned the bombing incident and urged the Myanmar side to thoroughly investigate the case and inform the Chinese side of the result.

    He also urged Myanmar to punish the perpetrator, appropriately handle the aftermath, and take immediate and effective measures to prevent recurrence of such incidents and safeguard the security and stability in the border areas between China and Myanmar.

    Following the incident, China's Air Force sent fighter jets to patrol the China-Myanmar border in southwestern Yunnan province, a military spokesman said.

    The People's Liberation Army Air Force dispatched several batches of fighter jets on Friday to "track, monitor, warn and chase away" Myanmar military planes flying close to the Chinese border, said air force spokesman Shen Jinke.

    He said the air force will take measures to enhance response over the China-Myanmar border in order to "safeguard sovereignty of the national territorial air space".

    China's concerns rose as fighting between the rebel National Democratic Alliance Army ( MDAA) headed by ethnic Chinese commander Peng Jiasheng and the Myanmar army intensified in recent months.

    Peng had reached a peace accord with the Myanmar government which lasted until 2009. The fighting again started recently prompting?Myanmar?to seek Chinese?assistance to put it down.

    The conflict also resulted in several thousand refugees taking shelter in?China.

    A total of 146 people, including 126 Chinese nationals, were arrested in raids on illegal logging that began in January in?Myanmar's conflict-stricken northern Kachin state, according to Chinese state media reports.

    According to state-run Global Times, hundreds of Chinese citizens include jade dealers, gold miners and loggers, were among 2,000 civilians trapped by fighting that started in January between government troops and the rebel Kachin Independence Army (KIA) in Kachin state, which borders southern?China.

    China deploys fighter jets along tense Myanmar border | Zee News
     
  4. Samar Rathi

    Samar Rathi Regular Member

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    PLA into Yunan

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  5. Samar Rathi

    Samar Rathi Regular Member

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    China Preparing for No fly Zone

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  6. Samar Rathi

    Samar Rathi Regular Member

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    Prepare for No-fly Zone, PLA missile & Army on the way to the border

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    China stop all international airlines fly from YuNan to Myanmar cities.
     
  7. Samar Rathi

    Samar Rathi Regular Member

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    China scrambles jets after Myanmar bomb kills four people in Yunnan province

    Beijing: China has lodged diplomatic protests and scrambled fighter jets to the border with neighbouring Myanmar after a bomb from a Burmese warplane killed four people in China's south-western Yunnan province on Friday.

    Myanmar's government forces are fighting armed rebels and supporters of the Kokang people, a Mandarin-speaking ethnic Chinese minority, in the country's northern Shan state. The renewed conflict has displaced tens of thousands of people in recent weeks, many fleeing across the porous 2000-kilometre border into mainland China.

    State media said the bomb hit a sugarcane field in the Chinese border city of Lincang, killing four and injuring nine. It follows another incident last week where a stray bomb hit a civilian home in Yunnan province, but which did not result in any casualties.

    Liu Zhenmin, a Chinese vice-minister for foreign affairs, summoned Myanmar ambassador Thit Linn Ohn in Beijing on Friday to condemn the killings of civilians and the intrusion into Chinese territory, according to a statement released by the Chinese foreign ministry.

    "We urge the Myanmar side to thoroughly investigate the incident and report the findings to the Chinese side, and to sternly punish the perpetrator," Mr Liu said, according to official news agency Xinhua.

    Shen Jinke, spokesman for the air force of China's People's Liberation Army, said China sent several warplanes to disperse the low-flying Myanmar planes approaching the Chinese border, adding that Beijing would tighten the monitoring of airspace over the border.

    The fighting in Kokang is the bloodiest Myanmar has seen for years, and as well as having the potential to undermine the country's ceasefire negotiations, it threatens to complicate already testy ties between Naypyidaw and Beijing.

    The Myanmar government blames the renewed ethnic fighting on a renegade rebel faction led by the militia's octogenarian leader, Pheung Kya-shin (also known by his Chinese name Peng Jiasheng), and of local Yunnan provincial officials allowing the rebels to use Chinese territory to outflank government troops. Myanmar officials also accuse China of arming and financing the Kokang militia.

    Beijing has denied any links with the ethnic Chinese rebels in Myanmar, saying it respects Myanmar's sovereignty, while Peng, the Kokang rebel leader, has also denied receiving any assistance.

    China's government had tried to distance itself from the conflict, with an editorial in the state-run Global Times warning people to "avoid any premature stance of interference" in Myanmar affairs.

    But the news of Chinese casualties has received prominent media coverage in China, testing the limits of the country's non-interference policy if a wave of nationalist sentiment against Myanmar is allowed to rise.

    http://www.smh.com.au/world/china-scrambles-jets-after-myanmar-bomb-kills-four-people-in-yunnan-province-20150314-1442x9.html
     
  8. Samar Rathi

    Samar Rathi Regular Member

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    Kokang violence spreads to Yunnan, escalates Burma-China tensions

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    Fighting between government and ethnic groups in Burma’s Kokang region crossed into Chinese territory this week, creating tensions between Burma and one of its closest allies and prime foreign investors after a bomb from a Burmese warplane reportedly hit a sugarcane field in the Chinese border city of Lincang, killing four people working there on Friday and wounding nine others.

    China condemned the incident and summoned Burma Ambassador Thit Linn Ohn in Beijing.

    China’s CCTV news tweeted that China Eastern Airlines canceled flights from Kunming, Yunnan to the Burmese cities of Naypyidaw, Yangon and Mandalay on Friday.

    Earlier, another shell fell on a house in southern China’s Yunnan Province, which borders Burma. The building was reportedly destroyed but reports indicate that no one died from that particular bombing. Radio Free Asia said the spill-over fighting caused forest fires, and quoted a local Chinese man saying that several people had died during several days of fighting, and that due to an “information blackout”, “you won’t read about this elsewhere.”

    Another resident described “deafening” shelling that “went on for hours.”

    Violence between the Burmese army and the Myanmar National Democratic Alliance Army (MNDAA) began in northern Shan state on Feb. 9. Since then, at least 60,000 refugees are said to have sought safety in Yunnan, according to Channel News Asia. The Chinese government urged Burma to get control of the situation and make sure it doesn’t escalate, and envoys from both countries have been in talks about a solution, Channel News Asia reported.

    The Burmese government “accused Chinese mercenaries of fighting with ethnic Chinese rebels against the government in the northern region of Kokang and has sought China’s cooperation to prevent ‘terrorist attacks’ launched from its territory,” according to Channel News Asia.

    The website GoKunming suggested that the fighting “could seriously challenge China’s stance of non-interference.”

    Those refugees who fled to safety in China reportedly face dire conditions in camps, including shortages of basic medical supplies and food.

    Human rights groups have said that the Burmese army killed 100 people in Kokang, including children and the elderly, and burned sugarcane fields that were ready for harvest. The government insists that many of those killed were not civilians, but combatants.

    RFA quoted a retired member of the Chinese People’s Liberation Army saying that Chinese volunteers had crossed into Burma to help the rebels in Kokang. However, those who travel from other parts of China are reportedly now being detained to prevent them from entering the fight.

    The retired PLA soldier described the situation this way:

    “A lot of Chinese people don’t want to see others in trouble, and helping them is like helping ourselves. … You can’t rely on the government. They only serve their own political power. But it worries me that once we go in there, it will mess things up.”

    Kokang violence spreads to Yunnan, escalates Burma-China tensions | Asian Correspondent
     
  9. Samar Rathi

    Samar Rathi Regular Member

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  10. prohumanity

    prohumanity Regular Member

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    Can anyone explain why there is this border tension between China and Myanmar ? Last time, I saw... China was investing a lot of money in Myanmar. What changed now ?
     
  11. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    Could be that these preparations are a security measure to counter the ethnic army from entering China.
     
  12. Samar Rathi

    Samar Rathi Regular Member

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    There are ethnic Chinese lives in kokang region in burma and PRC arm them ,it's similar to LTTE situation in Sri Lanka.
     
  13. MANT!

    MANT! Regular Member

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  14. amoy

    amoy Senior Member Senior Member

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    it was sparked by comeback of Peng the previous ruling clan of the tiny Kokang autonomous region. previously Peng was ousted on charges of arms and drug trafficking and replaced by his deputy who's loyal to the Burmese central govmt.

    Peng is also being supported by his allies of other ethnic insurgents, who fight alongside for more autonomy from Burmese in the south.

    ~Tapa talks: Orange is the new black.~
     
  15. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    I am sure the Chinese would have had a robust air defence system in place in the area where this unfortunate occurrence took place.

    The Chinese should have scrambled and taken on the intruder and forced him to turn back.

    But these things happen.
     
  16. t_co

    t_co Senior Member Senior Member

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    The Lincang Airport schedule has changed in recent days - seems like the PLAAF have commandeered a portion of the airport to house a mixed squadron of J-10s and Su-30s. Those birds were reported as flying combat air patrols along the border. A KJ-2000 AWACS system was also spotted in the air above Lincang today.

    The ground systems Rathi posted include a truck-mounted H-200 phased array engagement radar. a command truck, and a launcher truck with two HQ-16 surface-to-air missiles in a dual-launch configuration.
     
  17. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    @sorcerer

    The Han that rock the cradle

    The Kokang conflict causes problems for China, too
    Mar 14th 2015 | NANSAN, YUNNAN PROVINCE |


    FOR most of the past three weeks 19 members of the Yang family have lived in “125”, a refugee camp that straddles the Myanmar-China border. They left their homes in February when fighting flared up between Burmese government troops and local rebels, says one of the Yang sisters, carrying the youngest of her six children on her back in a red velvet sling. But after shelling came perilously close to the camp one night, they fled again, this time crossing into China, laden down with bedding, clothes and “water-smoking pipe”, or giant bamboo hookah. They joined the 60,000 or so Burmese who, the Chinese state media say, have entered Yunnan province since early February.

    The fighting in Kokang, a small region in Myanmar’s northern Shan state, is the bloodiest the country has seen for years. It risks undermining Myanmar’s ceasefire talks. It also worsens an already turbulent relationship between Myanmar and China and highlights differences between the central government in Beijing and far-flung Yunnan, one of China’s poorest provinces, which shares a 2,000km border with Myanmar.

    The conflict involves China partly because the fighting is on its doorstep: on March 8th stray bombs damaged a house on the Chinese side. Kokang also retains a special place in China’s psyche. It was part of the country until the Qing dynasty ceded it to Britain in 1897. Around 90% of the Kokang are ethnic Han-Chinese (a similar proportion make up China’s own population); they speak Mandarin, use Weibo, a Chinese microblogging site, and many have friends and relatives in Yunnan. Some have Chinese identity cards.

    The government of Myanmar claims the Chinese are training Kokang fighters. Some accuse them of arming or financing the Kokang militia, too, and of allowing them to use Chinese territory to outflank government troops. The militia’s octogenarian leader, Peng Jiasheng (known as Phone Kyar Shin in Burmese), denies these allegations but has tried to whip up Chinese support online, reminding the Chinese of their “common race and roots”. Though they are not Chinese citizens, the Kokang’s ethnicity increases domestic pressure on China’s government to respond in some way, reckons Enze Han of the School of Oriental and African Studies in London. Some Chinese people criticised the government when it failed to react to anti-Chinese riots in Indonesia in 1998.

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    China’s government has tried to dissociate itself from the conflict. An editorial in the state-run Global Times newspaper warned people to “avoid any premature stance or interference” in Myanmar’s affairs; Chinese news reports refer to “border people” rather than “refugees”. The government has yet to allow the United Nations refugee agency access to the camps. A facility for refugees at the international convention centre in Nansan, a town just across the border from the main crossing-point in the Kokang capital, Laukkai, was shut within three weeks of the conflict starting. It is unclear what happened to the inhabitants. Some richer Kokang booked into hotels or rented places in Nansan, but the city is not overrun with Burmese—and few have returned to their homes.

    For the government in Beijing the local conflict is bothersome: China’s leaders care more about domestic stability and regional economic ties than border tribes. Official policy towards Myanmar, as elsewhere, is not to intervene. Myanmar’s military junta relied on China when the West imposed sanctions in the 1990s, which led to a backlash against the country in 2011 after Thein Sein came to power. Some contracts have since been renegotiated and Chinese investment has recovered. China now sees Myanmar mainly as a trading partner and energy supplier.

    But the influx of Kokang has forced China to become more involved. Resources have been mobilised quickly to deal with the incomers and several temporary facilities opened—though at least one has been closed, and there have been unconfirmed reports of refugees being forced back to Myanmar. Still, the situation is a lot better than in the recent past. In 2009 30,000 people fled another flare-up in Kokang, the largest refugee crisis on China’s border since the war with Vietnam in 1979. In 2011-12 hostilities in Kachin again forced thousands into Yunnan. On both occasions, China’s humanitarian response was weak and late, says Yun Sun of the Stimson Centre, a think-tank in Washington. Since then a succession of natural disasters has given China more experience in dealing with internally displaced people.

    The conflict also sheds light on the different priorities of Beijing and Yunnan. Although trade with Myanmar accounts for less than 1% of China’s total, it makes up 24% of Yunnan’s. Residents on both sides benefit from being allowed to move freely, but fighting jeopardises that. So local Yunnanese ought to have a strong incentive to end the fighting.

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    At the same time illegitimate commercial activities conducted by Chinese companies in northern Myanmar—including illegal mining, logging and smuggling conducted under the noses of local officials—help to finance local militias. These illicit ventures are sources of conflict with locals. And they are at the root of Burmese accusations that China is supporting and arming the separatists. The government in Beijing could do more to clamp down on such trade.

    It has already moved to increase its oversight of Yunnan and the border with Myanmar. In 2009 provincial officials either did not know or did not tell the authorities in Beijing that a conflict was brewing. Now the Chinese army, rather than the local border police, controls the boundary. And officials in Beijing have established direct links with ethnic groups inside Myanmar, rather than going through their Yunnanese counterparts, as before. But the Chinese authorities do not have an appetite for being sucked in. Unless the violence gets much worse, the government in Beijing is unlikely to step in to try to make peace between Myanmar’s government and the Kokang.
    Myanmar and China: The Han that rock the cradle | The Economist
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 10, 2015
  18. amoy

    amoy Senior Member Senior Member

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    the Myanmar military junta in many ways resembles Chiang Kai_shek's KMT govmt. It virtually controlled oppulent provinces at the lower reach of Yangtz only. most of other provinces were ruled by numerous warlords, who were taxing, and even issuing their own currencies. they all recognized Nanjing as the Central and even joined the KMT party :D but meanwhile thwarted any attempt by Nanjing to infiltrate their domains and flirted with diff. foreign powers. ironically such a disintegrating situation justified and enforced Chiang's dictatorship in turn.

    the ascent of Aung Sang Suu Kyi to power is not bad though her chance is slim in face of resistance by the entrenched vested interest of the military to the transition to a "democracy".

    ~Tapa talks: Orange is the new black.~
     
  19. Samar Rathi

    Samar Rathi Regular Member

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    From my knowledge Chinese military already established no fly zone in the area now but my question is why it was not established earlier as this incident happened in recent past too?

    Also i might be wrong but i have a sense there is USA hand behind it for testing the water or try to create Ukraine type scenario :?
     
  20. Samar Rathi

    Samar Rathi Regular Member

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    4 Chinese killed, 9 injured by stray warplane

    Chinese Vice Foreign Minister Liu Zhenmin has summoned Myanmar's ambassador Thit Linn Ohn in Beijing, over a stray bomb from the armed conflict in northern Myanmar which landed across the border in China and killed four civilians.

    There's been heavy fighting between Myanmar troops and ethnic Kokang rebels near the Chinese border since February. The bomb was dropped by a warplane in Lin-cang city, in China's southwestern Yunnan Province. Nine others were also injured.

    Liu condemned the incident and urged Myanmar to thoroughly investigate. He also urged Myanmar to take immediate measures to prevent recurrence of such incidents and safeguard the security and stability in the border areas between the two countries.

    4 Chinese killed, 9 injured by stray warplane - CCTV News - CCTV.com English
     
  21. Samar Rathi

    Samar Rathi Regular Member

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