The Conflict in YEMEN

Discussion in 'West Asia & Africa' started by pmaitra, Sep 21, 2014.

  1. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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    Yemen Shia-Sunni Clashes

    Yemen PM 'quits' amid clashes

    Source: BBC News - Yemen PM 'quits' amid clashes
     
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  3. rock127

    rock127 Maulana Rockullah Senior Member

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    Re: Yemen Shia-Sunni Clashes

    Yemen Spring?
     
  4. IBSA

    IBSA Regular Member

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    Re: Yemen Shia-Sunni Clashes

    Syria’s Yemeni Opportunity and the Rise of the Shia Circle

    MOSCOW, September 22 (RIA Novosti) - The Yemeni Prime Minister resigned on Sunday as a result of a UN-brokered peace deal between the government and Houthi supporters. Long ostracized from political and social life, the Shiite- affiliated group had been organizing for increased representation over the past decade. Although they officially deny it, it has long been thought that they act as Iranian proxies in the Arabian Peninsula. The recent events in Yemen, which on the surface may seem completely unrelated to the War in Syria, are actually quite important in altering the regional fundamentals dictating American and Saudi strategy against Damascus.
    The inclusion of the Houthis into the Yemeni government and their speedy and skillful demonstration of force and influence over the past week place Saudi Arabia on the strategic defensive. Not only do they have to contend with the prospect of an Iranian-friendly government on their southern Shiite border, but taken in a regional perspective, it appears as though Iran is cementing its Shia Circle. All of this bodes well for Syria, as the Saudis are now faced with a conundrum over whether to aggressively pursue regime change in Damascus and risk domestic Shia destabilization, or to negotiate with arch-rival Iran and reach an agreement to mitigate overall tensions.

    The Shia Circle

    Saudi Arabia and Iran have been engaged in a Cold War-like struggle for influence in the Mideast, with the former trying to lead the Sunni majority and the latter supporting the Shia minority. As part of this competition, each side has been jockeying for influence in all of the regional states. The Saudis have entrenched their influence over the Gulf countries via the Riyadh-led Gulf Cooperation Council, and the Iranians made gains in the so-called Shia crescent between Iran, Iraq, and Syria. Had this been the only geopolitical configuration in the Mideast, regional influence would have been relatively evenly divided, with neither side having an advantage over the other. However, Iran has been able to mobilize Shia influence ‘behind enemy lines’ in Bahrain, eastern and southern Saudi Arabia, and Yemen. This reverse Shia crescent, when combined with the existing one, creates a Shia Circle of Iranian influence around Saudi Arabia to counter the Saudi-supported Sunni insurgents fighting in Syria and Iraq.

    Yemen as the Backdoor to Saudi Arabia

    Yemen is the poorest country in the Arab world and has long been a center of destabilization for the area. It is a heavily divided society composed of many competing interest groups, ranging from the Shiite Houthis and Ansarullah to Sunni-affiliated Al Qaeda terrorists and South Yemeni separatists. The unification of North and South Yemen in 1990 was premature, as the South had cold feet and attempted to once more secede during the Civil War of 1994. After the North’s victory and the preservation of a unified Yemen, the weak government continued to mismanage the country, and Yemen remained a hotbed of instability.
    The Houthis began their uprising against the authorities in 2004, and since then, Saudi jets have occasionally bombed their positions near the joint border. The Saudis fear that the Houthis, whom they suspect of being under Iranian influence, could spread their influence, arms, and fighters into the abutting Shia region of southern Saudi Arabia, further destabilizing the Kingdom and expanding their rival’s reach in a vulnerable rear flank. The Arab Spring events increased this trepidation, since the majority Shia began to rebel in Sunni-led Bahrain, and it was only due to massive Saudi military involvement that the protests were violently squelched, although they still continue intermittently to this day. Furthermore, Shiite protests in eastern Saudi Arabia scared the monarchy into thinking that Iran could directly influence events within its borders, so it quickly increased the amount of government handouts it provided to its citizens in order to buy their passivity.

    Last Week’s Events

    Throughout all of this, Yemen remained a vulnerable oversight in the Saudi strategy. Although Riyadh lost relative influence when long-time president and Saudi ally Ali Abuddlah Saleh resigned in November 2011 after wide scale protests against his rule, his vice president quickly assumed leadership and largely continued the friendly pro-Saudi policies of his predecessor. The main fallacy of this strategy, however, was the continuity in anti-Houthi activity by Abd Rabbuh Mansur Hadi, the new president, and his underestimation of their political will, strength, and influence. The Houthis continued their rebellion for more rights and representation, and taking advantage of new fuel price hikes that increased anti-government sentiment, they speedily made their move on the capital in the past week. They blamed the current unrest on the Prime Minister, who has now resigned, and underscored that they wanted to work with Hadi and not overthrow him. This gained the support of the military, which was important in preventing major bloodshed. The UN then brokered an emergency peace deal that mandates the creation of a more inclusive government, with Houthi, Ansarullah, and Southern representatives.

    Lines in the Sand

    The Houthi victory in Yemen is actually a victory for all underrepresented groups, although it can be seen as a strategic defeat for Saudi Arabia. By demonstrating their ability to quickly change political events in the country and garner implicit support from the armed forces, they have shown Saudi Arabia that they are a serious force to be reckoned with. Additionally, the peace deal institutionalizes their influence in the country’s government, thereby meaning that sporadic airstrikes in the northern desert will no longer be sufficient in containing them. Thus, the proxy lines have been drawn in the sand, so to speak, between Iran and Saudi Arabia, with Tehran having scored an indirect victory through the Houthis’ astounding success over the weekend.
    By becoming a legitimate force (among the most important ones right now) in Yemen and commanding influence over its military, the Houthis (and to an extent, Iran) have opened up a strategic rear flank of uncertainty against Saudi Arabia. Riyadh now faces the risk that Houthi influence and forces could theoretically move over the empty border with Yemen and into the Shia-populated areas there. What’s more, any Shia uprising in southern Saudi Arabia would open up a window of opportunity for the Shia in the eastern part of the country to resurrect their own uprising, potentially leading to a chain reaction of destabilization within the Kingdom. Of course, this scenario does not have to happen, and it could be avoided if the Saudis (covertly) go to the negotiating table with Iran.

    A Grand Bargain

    Iran’s immediate interests in this context are in safeguarding the security of the democratically elected government in Syria, not in overthrowing the Saudi monarchy, and the Saudis are interested in securing their country and its borders above all else. When faced with the specter of a Shia- and Iranian-influenced domestic uprising as payback for its militant support of the Syrian insurgents, the Saudis would obviously be threatened, and the flimsy stability that their governing legitimacy depends on could collapse into civil warfare. Understanding this, the Saudis would rather enter into a deal with their hated foe, Iran, than lose their power or lives. This means that the circumstances are set for the regional rivals to sit down at the negotiating table and hammer out a tentative détente.
    Should this transpire, it is not known exactly what the details would entail, but most certainly, Iranian influence on Saudi Arabia’s Yemeni backdoor and Saudi support of the anti-government militants in Syria would be high on the agenda. One could postulate that although both sides would never stop supporting their regional allies entirely, they may place a short-term ceiling on their support in order to move forward in other regards. For example, Saudi Arabia won’t realistically rescind its de-facto support of terrorism in Syria and Iraq, but it could redirect its proxy militants there back towards the southern and eastern provinces, the Yemeni border, and perhaps re-infiltrate back into Yemen itself as a ‘security buffer’. Iran, for its part, would leave its support for the Houthi-involved government at its current level, happy with institutionalizing its influence and not ‘rocking the boat’. In this case, both Saudi Arabia and Iran pivot vis-à-vis the other, all the while Riyadh refocuses on more pressing domestic (and possibly existential) matters than regime change in Syria.

    Concluding Thoughts

    The weekend’s events in Yemen took many off guard, but in hindsight, it should not have come as a surprise. The Iranians, boasting a four-thousand-year-old history, are experts in asymmetrical responses to conventional threats, and the pseudo-coup in Yemen should be seen as a counter to the developing anti-Syrian coalition and the fulfillment of the Shia Circle. The Houthis’ lightning-fast rise from political and social obscurity to one of the dominant factors in the new Yemeni government places the Saudis on the strategic defensive and may result in a recalibration of their foreign policy priorities. Pivoting from offensive regime change in the north to defensive posturing in the south will relieve pressure on the Syrian Arab Army and severely weaken Obama’s Syrian regime change coalition. Of course, the Saudis will never fully abandon their support of Islamic militants in Syria, but if Iran uses its support of the Houthis in Yemen to pressure the Monarchy, it could result in a grand regional bargain that may buy more valuable time for Syria’s survival.

    Syria’s Yemeni Opportunity and the Rise of the Shia Circle | Authors | RIA Novosti
     
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  5. IBSA

    IBSA Regular Member

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    Re: Yemen Shia-Sunni Clashes

    Yemen's Houthi rebels advance into Sanaa
    Fierce battles between army and rebels continue for third day in the capital, forcing hundreds to flee their homes.
    Last updated: 20 Sep 2014 13:41

    [​IMG]

    Yemen's government troops have been battling Houthi rebels for a third day in the capital Sanaa after the collapse of ceasefire talks, officials and residents say.

    Explosions were heard on Saturday near the Interior Ministry in the northern part of Sanaa, a day after the Shia fighters began shelling the state television building as they advanced into the city.

    Khaled Hammadi, a journalist based in Sanaa, told Al Jazeera that heavy smoke was hanging over the area of the state TV building on Saturday.

    "Fighting is expanding hour by hour and the Houthi rebel fighters are advancing into neighbourhoods near important areas," he said.

    Meanwhile, reports from Sanaa said the Yemeni army was commencing a counterattack on the Houthis with back-up from the Republican Guard unit.

    Hakim al-Masmari, the editor-in-chief of the Yemen Post, told Al Jazeera that Saturday's clashes have been the fiercest since fighting began on Thursday. He said that dozens of Houthi fighters were killed in Sanaa in the latest round of fighting.

    He added that there could be a truce between the warring sides later in the day.

    At least a 123 fighters have been killed over the past three days, according to a tally by the Associated Press news agency.

    Thousands of Houthis have been staging protests in Sanaa for more than a month now, besieging ministries and blocking the road to the main airport.

    Fighting in Sanaa had become so intense that by Friday international airlines suspended flights in and out of the nearby airport.

    The UN has failed to mediate a peace deal between the warring sides.

    Jamal Benomar, the UN envoy to Yemen, left the northern city of Saada on Friday after trying to mediate a deal that could pave the way for a new government and more political representation for the Houthis.

    Clashes have raged on the outskirts of Sanaa for days, with dozens of deaths reported.

    Earlier, Al Jazeera's Hashem Ahelbarra, reporting from Sanaa, said the country "is just a few hours" from plunging into a civil war as the capital is divided along sectarian lines, with one half run by Sunnis and the other by Houthis".

    "The Houthis have control over most of the north of the country - from Saada to the gates of Sanaa," he said.

    "They have thousands of fighters and some military commanders and members of the former regime with them. And if in the coming hours they decide to control Sanaa, they can definitely control the capital.

    "If the Sunnis decide to join the fight against the Houthis, it's definitely going to be civil war in the country [...] It's either peace or war."

    The Houthis are a Zaidi Shia group whose traditional power base is in the north. They are demanding a new government and also more political power for their community.

    The government's plans for a six-region federation in Yemen has been rejected by both the Houthis and the southern separatists.

    ANALYSIS FROM OUR CORRESPONDENT Hashem Ahelbarra

    The UN was trying to mediate a deal which included the Houthis' demands for the formation a new government of technocrats, a reduction in fuel prices and more political representation. In exchange, the Houthis would pull out of Sanaa and put an end to their civil disobedience campaign.

    President Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi faces a tough choice: he is from the south and northern Yemen is not his power base. The army’s top military commanders are Shias and he is worried they might defy his orders if he calls for war.

    On the other hand, there is a growing frustration among the Sunnis. They say Hadi is weak, and that under his tenure more territory was lost to the Houthis. If the Houthis take control of Sanaa, Sunni tribes might call for his resignation.

    And if fighting breaks out in Sanaa, a city divided along sectarian lines and armed to the teeth, it might be the worst on the Arabian Peninsula in modern history.


    Explaining Yemen's political-military groups:

    Houthis - Shia group also known as Ansarullah, or Partisans of God, who have been at war with the government since 2004. They demand resignation of government, more political inclusion and access to the sea. Strongholds include Saada, al-Jawf and the Jeraf district inside Sanaa.

    Al-Islah (Reform) - Sunni Islamist party that draws support and membership from heavily armed Sunni tribesmen, and is instrumental in rallying support behind the army and the government. Present in almost all of Yemen. The Houthis have identified the party as its arch-enemy.

    Al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula - A merger of the Yemeni and Saudi branches of al-Qaeda. Seized large swathes of territory in the south and the southeast after the uprising in 2011. Launched many attacks on armed forces and central authority establishments. Its power bases are Shabwah, Abyan and Hadramawt.

    The Southern Separatist Movement - Umbrella group that wants the south to break away from the north and reinstate the former Socialist state that existed until 1990. Led by Ali al-Beidh.

    Yemen's Houthi rebels advance into Sanaa - Middle East - Al Jazeera English
     
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  6. IBSA

    IBSA Regular Member

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    Re: Yemen Shia-Sunni Clashes

    Jan. 22, 2015 | 10:24 PM
    Four south Yemen provinces to defy orders after president quits

    [​IMG]
    Yemeni armed members of pro-government militias, known as Popular Committees, patrol outside Aden's airport in southern Yemen on January 22, 2015 after it was shut down by Aden's security committee in protest against attacks by Shiite Huthi militiamen on the president and other state figures.

    Aden: Four provinces of Yemen's formerly independent south, including its main city Aden, said Thursday they would defy all military orders from Sanaa after President Abdrabuh Mansur Hadi resigned.

    The committee in charge of military and security affairs for Aden, Abyan, Lahej and Daleh, which is loyal to Hadi, said it had taken the decision after the president, who originally hails from the south, stepped down after a deadly standoff with militia in control of the capital.

    Four south Yemen provinces to defy orders after president quits | News , Middle East | THE DAILY STAR
     
  7. IBSA

    IBSA Regular Member

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    Re: Yemen Shia-Sunni Clashes

    Is North/South Yemen division backing??

    Shia Houthis rebels capture the presidential palace, the Saudi king dies, and South Yemen provinces proclaims independence from central government. After the king's death, the Saudis shall look for royal succession, and this could weaken their support capacity for Yemeni central gov forces. Houthis are in a very good momentum to gain the control over the country.

    And about India position. Yemen is a state of Indian Ocean, so India should be interested in events in that country. What side is it?
     
  8. Rowdy

    Rowdy Co ja kurwa czytam! Senior Member

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    Yemen conflict between Shia and sunnis ... all news here
    Latest Situation

    [​IMG]

    Yemen crisis: Houthi rebels announce takeover

    Yemen's Shia Houthi rebel movement has announced it is taking over the government and dissolving parliament.

    In a televised statement, the group said a five-member council would act as the president for an interim period.

    The group took control of the capital Sanaa in September, forcing the resignation of President Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi in January.

    The announcement comes after the failure of UN-brokered peace talks.

    The Houthis set a Wednesday deadline for political parties to reach an agreement on ending the country's political turmoil, threatening to act unilaterally otherwise.

    The rebels move would mark "a new era that will take Yemen to safe shores'', the statement said, according to Associated Press.

    People watch television as an announcement by the Houthi movement on dissolving the parliament is made in Sanaa
    The announcement was made on state television
    line
    Analysis: Sebastian Usher, BBC World Service

    The declaration will be seen by many Yemenis as the final stage of a Houthi coup, although some may feel that it could offer some hope of greater stability.

    Government decisions will now in effect be dictated by a revolutionary committee, dominated by the rebels.

    The Houthis delivered their message from the Republican palace in Sanaa to a huge gathering of political, military and tribal figures in an effort to show the range of their support.

    Their writ will not be recognised by many Sunni and southern leaders, threatening Yemen with a further descent into chaos.

    The UN's point man on Yemen, Jamal Benomar, headed straight to Saudi Arabia after the failure of talks to try to achieve some kind of political consensus there.

    It is a sign of how concerned the Saudis are over what they see as an Iranian-backed Shia takeover in a country where they're accustomed to calling the shots.

    Who are the Houthis?

    line
    Yemeni president Abdo Rabbo Mansour Hadi at the presidential palace
    President Hadi offered his resignation last month after the rebels tightened their grip on Sanaa
    The situation in Yemen escalated last month when the Houthis seized a key aide of President Hadi, in an attempt to block a draft constitution.

    They later took the presidential palace and other key buildings, prompting Mr Hadi's resignation. He said he could not continue in his post under such pressure

    He and and other ministers have been under house arrest since then.

    Iran has been accused of giving financial and military support to the Houthis - something both have denied.

    Yemen has been riven by instability since protesters inspired by the Arab Spring forced the overthrow of President Ali Abdullah Saleh in 2011, who is believed to have been backing the Houthis.

    The country is also fighting an al-Qaeda insurgency with the help of US drones.

    The US said it is continuing to work with Yemeni counterterrorism, but condemned the move by the Houthis.

    A Yemeni armed member of the Shiite Houthi movement in an army uniform guards a checkpoint on a street leading to the presidential palace in the capital Sanaa
    The Houthis' move formalises what many Yemenis see as a coup
    More on This Story


    BBC News - Yemen crisis: Houthi rebels announce takeover
     
  9. warrior monk

    warrior monk Regular Member

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    Yemen's President Flees His House in Aden as Rebels Advance.

    SANAA, Yemen — Yemen's embattled president fled his palace in the southern port city of Aden for an undisclosed location on Wednesday as Shiite rebels offered a bounty for his capture and arrested his defense minister. Hours later, the rebels launched airstrikes targeting presidential forces guarding the palace.

    President Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi left just hours after the rebels' own television station said they seized an air base where U.S. troops and Europeans advised the country in its fight against al-Qaida militants. That air base is only 60 kilometers (35 miles) away from Aden, where Hadi had established a temporary capital.

    The advance of the Shiite rebels, empowered by the backing of the ousted Yemeni autocrat Ali Abdullah Saleh and his loyalists, threatens to plunge the Arab world's poorest country into a civil war that could draw in its Gulf neighbors. Already, Hadi has asked the United Nations to authorize a foreign military intervention in the country.

    The takeover of Aden, the country's economic hub, would mark the collapse of what is left of Hadi's grip on power. It would also open a new chapter in the Houthi-Saleh alliance and possibly pave the way for more infighting.

    Aden was tense Wednesday, with schools, government offices, shops and restaurants largely closed. Inside the few remaining opened cafes, men watched the news on television.

    Since the morning, there were conflicting reports on Hadi's whereabouts. Witnesses said they saw a convoy of presidential vehicles leaving Hadi's palace on top of a hill overlooking the Arabian Sea. A second convoy was seen heading to the Aden airport, where flights have been halted amid the Houthi advance.

    Military officials said militias and military units loyal to Hadi had "fragmented," speeding the rebel advance. They said the rebels were fighting Hadi's troops on five different fronts Wednesday.

    Presidential officials said Hadi was in an operations room overseeing his forces' response. They declined to say where that facility was located. All officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to talk to the media.

    Yemen's state TV, now controlled by the Houthis, made an offer of nearly $100,000 for Hadi's capture.

    Also Wednesday, Defense Minister Maj. Gen. Mahmoud al-Subaihi and his top aide were arrested in the southern city of Lahj, where fighting with Houthi forces was ongoing, and were subsequently transferred to Sanaa.

    Later, the rebels and Saleh's loyalists carried out three airstrikes targeting the Aden palace presidential compound and Hadi's forces positioned there, officials said. No casualties were reported in the strikes, similar to ones carried out last week.

    Yemen's Foreign Minister Riad Yassin told Dubai-based Al-Arabiya TV satellite news network that he officially made a request to the Arab League on Wednesday to send a military force to intervene against the Houthis. Yassin is attending the Arab Summit due to take place in Egypt at the end of the week.

    The airstrikes were an attempt to "assassinate" Hadi, Yassin said in another interview with the Doha-based Al-Jazeera TV network.

    Depicting the Houthis as a proxy of Shiite Iran, a rival to Sunni Gulf countries, Yassin warned of an Iranian "takeover" of Yemen. The Houthis deny they are backed by Iran.

    Mohammed Abdel-Salam, a spokesman for the Houthis, said their forces were not aiming to "occupy" the south. "They will be in Aden in few hours," Abdel-Salam told the rebels' satellite Al-Masirah news channel.

    Earlier, Al-Masirah reported that the Houthis and allied fighters had "secured" the al-Annad air base, the country's largest. It claimed the base had been looted by both al-Qaida fighters and troops loyal to Hadi.

    The reported Houthi takeover of the base came after hours-long clashes between rival forces around the base. The U.S. recently evacuated some 100 soldiers, including Special Forces commandos, from the base after al-Qaida briefly seized a nearby city. Britain also evacuated soldiers.

    The base was crucial in the U.S. drone campaign against Al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula, which Washington considers to be the most dangerous offshoot of the terror group. And American and European military advisers there also assisted Hadi's government in its fight against al-Qaida's branch, which holds territory in eastern Yemen and has claimed the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo in Paris.

    U.S. operations against the militants have been scaled back dramatically amid Yemen's chaos. U.S. officials have said CIA drone strikes will continue in the country, though there will be fewer of them. The agency's ability to collect intelligence on the ground in Yemen, while not completely gone, is also much diminished.

    The Houthis, in the aftermath of massive suicide bombings in Sanaa last week that killed at least 137 people, ordered a general mobilization and their leader, Abdel-Malik al-Houthi, vowed to send his forces to the south to fight al-Qaida and militant groups.

    The Houthis seized the capital, Sanaa, in September and have since been advancing south alongside forces loyal to Saleh.

    On Tuesday, Houthis and their allies fired bullets and tear gas to disperse thousands of protesters in the city of Taiz, known as the gateway to southern Yemen. Six demonstrators were killed and scores more were wounded, officials said.

    The Houthis also battled militias loyal to Hadi in the city of al-Dhalea adjacent to Taiz. Al-Dhalea, Yemen's third-largest city, is also the birthplace of its 2011 Arab Spring-inspired uprising that forced Saleh to hand over power to Hadi in a deal brokered by the U.N. and Gulf countries.

    Hadi on Tuesday asked the U.N. Security Council to authorize a military intervention "to protect Yemen and to deter the Houthi aggression" in Aden and the rest of the south. In his letter, Hadi said he also has asked members of the six-nation Gulf Cooperation Council and the Arab League for immediate help.

    Saudi Arabia warned that "if the Houthi coup does not end peacefully, we will take the necessary measures for this crisis to protect the region."

    Hadi's allies among the Gulf Arab countries, including Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Kuwait, have evacuated their diplomatic staff from Aden over the past few days, officials said. They had earlier evacuated from Sanaa and relocated to Aden to support Hadi.

    http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2015/03/25/world/middleeast/ap-ml-yemen.html?_r=0

    Looks like Iranian takeover over Yemen is near complete.
     
  10. IBSA

    IBSA Regular Member

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    Re: Yemen Shia-Sunni Clashes

    Well, well.

    Houthi forces has taken Aden port-city, the overthrow president Hadi go away, and now Saudi started to strike houthi positions on Yemen

    A KSA-led alliance of 10 countries said will take part in this war, including Pakistan. Someone confirm Pak participation?? If true, what India intend to do on Yemen crisis??

    Moderator, change the thread name to Yemen Crisis, like as that Syria Crisis. The nature of conflict isnt religious sectarism.
     
  11. Khagesh

    Khagesh Regular Member

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    Re: Yemen Shia-Sunni Clashes

    Then what kind is it. Is it about Nations? What is the total national history of people outside India. Is it about Culture? What Culture?

    It is exactly like it was in the north of KSA. In Syria.

    Here is how you have explained the warring sides. Now how is this not about religion?



    Or is it 'about religion only when it is happening to Brazil' and 'not about religion when happening to Shias'.

    Is religion any different from politics?
     
  12. Compersion

    Compersion Senior Member Senior Member

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    Re: Yemen Shia-Sunni Clashes

    Iran must asking the reason why was Sunnis were able to have military support in Bahrain in a population majority of Shias ...

    yet in Yemen and Syria ... is Saudi Arabi saying that again Iran can only watch

    Is Saudi and Sunni forces that superior to Shia in thought and action ... they can make Iran do what they want

    also

    the checkmate would be if Iran attacks Pakistan ... probably a mistake to get 10 nations together it ought have been the Saudi gone alone.

    really curios that Saudi Arabia is saying it is a joint force - is it they have insecurity over their own forces going alone and they are hedging the risk

    Saudi-led coalition strikes Houthi rebels in Yemen - CNN.com

    Also what and where is the United Nations ... and the UNSC :confused: :namaste:
     
  13. anoop_mig25

    anoop_mig25 Senior Member Senior Member

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    Re: Yemen Shia-Sunni Clashes

    100 saudi jets to take on bunch of terrorist

    Speaks of saudi AF :rofl:
     
  14. Compersion

    Compersion Senior Member Senior Member

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    Re: Yemen Shia-Sunni Clashes

    the total population of the Shias in India + Pakistan = Iran

    There is Iraq, Yemen, POK, Azerbaijan, Afghanistan, Bahrain Syria, Nigeria, Turkey, Lebanon, and Saudi Arabia that have sizable (the latter states dont have Shia majority but big numbers). The Shias in large numbers can cause big problems and they are probably more united compared to the Sunnis.

    There are about 5 areas in the world that has Shia majority ... If Iran does not play it properly this might galvanize Sunni forces led by Saudi Arabi (to be the sole Islam (Sunni) leader - but Pakistan might want a say in that) collectiveness to wipe out and control Shia even more. Would it be the new ottoman empire being HQ near Mecca.

    also

    It is ironic that Iran is entering into a détente type of (nuclear) discussion with the west. The Sunnis might be responding to that ... The west might be motivating the Sunnis to show how they have benefited with relations with the west especially with the comfort and coordination they are able to deliver. But will Iran take the hint and respond differently

    fascinating
     
  15. SajeevJino

    SajeevJino Long walk Elite Member

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    Re: Yemen Shia-Sunni Clashes


    Do you know that Saudi did the SEAD and gained Air superiority over Yemeni Air space
     
  16. Compersion

    Compersion Senior Member Senior Member

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    Re: Yemen Shia-Sunni Clashes

    United Nations Charter - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Also the timing and visit of Emir of Qatar, Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani to India is fascinating

    [​IMG]

    Qatar has big investment plans for India: Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani - The Economic Times

    (if this was a coordinated by the Sunnis and Saudi Arabia - impressive one can say).
     
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2015
  17. anoop_mig25

    anoop_mig25 Senior Member Senior Member

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    Re: Yemen Shia-Sunni Clashes

    i donot know about all those terms but seriouslly do one require 130+ fighter planes to attacks those so called terrorist ?????
     
  18. SajeevJino

    SajeevJino Long walk Elite Member

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    Re: Yemen Shia-Sunni Clashes

    It's a Full scale Air war, both for Air superiority, CAP and Ground Strike
     
  19. anoop_mig25

    anoop_mig25 Senior Member Senior Member

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    Re: Yemen Shia-Sunni Clashes

    do those supposed terrorist have airforce ?????
     
  20. SajeevJino

    SajeevJino Long walk Elite Member

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    Re: Yemen Shia-Sunni Clashes

    They flown MiG 29, they have KUB and MANPADS as well as good Numbers of AAA Batteries
     
  21. Compersion

    Compersion Senior Member Senior Member

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    Re: Yemen Shia-Sunni Clashes

    Why is Saudi Arabia bombing Yemen? - CNN.com

    Also

    Fascinating
     

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