The changing threat axis - Developments in Indian Oceans -II

Discussion in 'China' started by pyromaniac, Feb 27, 2009.

  1. pyromaniac

    pyromaniac Founding Member

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    THE Pakistan Navy. Navies all over the world are generally categorized according to the functions performed by them and the area of deployment. Generally these can be categorized in four broad categories as under:
    • Power projection Navy - e.g. US Navy, Royal Navy, French Navy.
    • Battle Space dominant Navy i.e. having control over the entire spectrum of battle space i.e. the surface, sub-surface, air land and space environment, including electromagnetic spectrum.
    • Regional Navies referring to Navies exercising influence in a particular region.
    • Sea Control Navies possessing a limited sea denial capability.
    • Lastly, Offshore Territorial Navy - A Navy having limited capability to operate from its shores.
    The Pakistan Navy (PN) in its present configuration is not an aspirant of the first two categories i.e. Power projection or Battle space Dominant Navy. In its present force level, it can best be described as a sea control Navy with a limited sea denial capability. This however, does not in any way imply that it is incapable of defending the maritime frontiers of Pakistan or protecting the maritime interest of the nation. At operational level the PN is engaged in a defensive offensive strategy. Translated into simple words, it implies that while carrying out the defence of its assets and resources, it fully retains the capability and potential of conducting active offence. It can best be described as a three dimensional force, with a potential capability of conducting surface, sub surface and air operations in its area of interest efficiently and effectively. According to an independent and foreign naval observer, "with a view to understand the strength of the Pakistan Navy, it is necessary to delve beneath its surface", obviously referring to the presence of a strong and potent submarine force.
    The role of the PN is not only restricted to defence of its maritime frontiers, but is effectively contributing to the stability in the North Indian Ocean. The PN as an effective instrument of its foreign policy and an emerging regional Navy has been actively engaged in participating with other foreign navies of the world and with the important Middle East Navies in particular.
    During March 2007, it was instrumental in hosting the biggest multinational naval exercise off Karachi. A total of 27 countries including Iran for the first time as an observer, attended and participated in Exercise AMAN - 07. While the basic aim of the exercise was to rehearse combined moves and tactics, and harmonize coalition operation to combat terrorism, it also signalled the message of maintenance of peace and stability in a turbulent region. The participant countries included warships, aircrafts and special forces from Bangladesh, China, France, Italy, Malaysia, Pakistan, Turkey, UK and the United States.
    CONCLUSION / RECOMMENDATION
    • The Pakistan Navy as an effective instrument of foreign policy and dictates of the national interest and aims of Pakistan, has made significant contributions as an emerging regional force in promoting prosperity peace and harmony amongst the comity of nation.
    • The fast changing geopolitical and geostrategic environment has placed dual and diverse responsibility on the PN. As a major player in the region, while pursuing the policy of maintaining stability in the North Indian Ocean, it has per force to fulfil its major obligation towards the maritime defence of the nation.
    • Realizing the importance of economics aggravated by world wide recession, the world community has gradually adopted a paradigm shift from geopolitics to geo-economics, and from Mutual Assured Destruction (MAD) to Mutual Assured Survival (MAS), thereby meaning a visible transformation in the conduct of war. In these circumstances there is a greater chance of `Perspective Wars' `Hidden Wars' and `Opportunity Wars' breaking out at the extreme end of the conflict spectrum.
    • The perceived Indian naval expansion in Indian Ocean Region should also be viewed at the geopolitical level with strong repercussions on geo-economics in the back drop of a worldwide recession. While the US, as the world unilateral superpower has a vital role to play in promoting stability and peace in the region, any incursions in the North Indian Ocean by India will have an adverse effect on the regions economic equilibrium, both at the international and national level. It must be remembered that the west `jugular vein' passes through some important water ways, while 97% of the Pakistan trade is carried through the sea.
    • The sea as a medium provides both opportunities and challenges for conduct of above type of wars. Thereby, implying greater alertness by naval forces through formulation of all foreseeable contingencies, standard operating procedures (SOP'S) and Rules of Engagement (ROE's) which will afford greater freedom of action to commanders operating independently at sea.
    • At strategic level the new `Cold Start' doctrine adopted and practiced by the Indian Anned Forces envisages a swift, fluid and relentless operation. It promises the challenges of a rapidly changing tactical situation in the background of fleeting opportunities.
    • The change in the threat axis from the land to the sea as advocated by India's policy makers cannot be taken lightly, especially in the background of the presence of numerous and well established Indian communication and consulates bordering Afghanistan. It may be significantly highlighted that Kabul is approximately 250 Miles from the Port of Gwadar as the crow flies. The continuing insurgency in strife ridden Baluchistan, explicitly supported by India has grave implications for the security of Pakistan and does not augur well in the overall security calculus and stability in the region.
    • Presence of information highways and the role of Information Warfare, cyber wars including the omnipresence of a strong, free, and forceful electronic and press media have made a significant contribution to crisis prevention and resolution. This role was amply highlighted by the Indian media hype created during the post Mumbai terrorist attack_ It is indeed a matter of satisfaction that the response from own media channels was a befitting one.
    • The salvation and subsequent progress of the PN, as a regional player in the Indian Ocean lies in its strategic westward orientation. Development of the Gwadar Port as a commercial entity and Ormara as a secondary naval base has become a strategic imperative.
    • While the PN cannot and should not compete at the quantitative force level with the Indian Navy, it should seek proactive choices of quality, consonant with improvements in competing attributes.
    • The induction of surface ships is a pressing requirement of the PN. The viability of surface ships, in the present hostile environment notwithstanding, suffice to say that the presence of a warship flying the sovereign flag of Pakistan heralds the political resolve of the country and is an important asset of furthering the aims and objectives of its foreign policy.
    • The presence of PLA (N) units has always been a welcome sight to the populace of Karachi. While Pakistan is connected by the strategic land route i.e. Grand Silk Route with the Peoples Republic of Chine, it will be in the overall interest and benefit both friendly countries, to improve further collaboration in the maritime field, and especially against combating terrorism at sea.
    • Inter services cooperation will play a vital role in today's modem battlefield. It is therefore but essential, that all planning contingencies and execution of war plans may be jointly under taken with a common threat perception.
    • Finally, the Naval developments in the Indian Ocean region require a fresh reappraisal of the maritime threat posed at the national level.


    This was written by a Pakistani; Commodore (R) Jamal Abdullah


    http://dailymailnews.com/200902/27/dmcolumnpage.html
     
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  3. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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  4. pyromaniac

    pyromaniac Founding Member

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    Nice I didn't know they had updated Global firepower...maybe I will do another thread in the strategy sections that discusses this :sniper:

    Personally I find the comparison very....surprising. I did not know that Pakistan only had 33 ships. Are they classifying this by the number of combat ships instead of adding the logistics and supply ships?
     
  5. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    this is all war capable ships.
     
  6. Atul

    Atul Founding Member

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    NAVY
    Total Navy Ships: 33
    Merchant Marine Strength: 14 [2008]
    Major Ports and Harbors: 2
    Aircraft Carriers: 0 [2008]
    Destroyers: 0 [2008]
    Submarines: 11 [2004]
    Frigates: 9 [2008]
    Patrol & Coastal Craft: 8 [2008]
    Mine Warfare Craft: 3 [2008]
    Amphibious Craft: 0 [2008]
     
  7. Atul

    Atul Founding Member

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    As for the Indian Navy

    NAVY
    Total Navy Ships: 143
    Merchant Marine Strength: 501 [2006]
    Major Ports and Harbors: 9
    Aircraft Carriers: 1 [2004]
    Destroyers: 8 [2004]
    Submarines: 18 [2004]
    Frigates: 16 [2004]
    Patrol & Coastal Craft: 43 [2008]
    Mine Warfare Craft: 12 [2008]
    Amphibious Craft: 7 [2004]
    :boat:
     
  8. Triton

    Triton Founding Member

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    I was surprised to see North Korea on top of the Naval session; they have more than 95 submarines :drink:
     

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