Ten Reasons Why Nepal Should Join India

Discussion in 'Foreign Relations' started by Nirvana, Feb 18, 2012.

  1. Nirvana

    Nirvana Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2012
    Messages:
    343
    Likes Received:
    147
    Location:
    Mumbai
    Sorry if this is in Wrong section !! came across this Article , very old article Though

    Ten Reasons Why Nepal Should Join India


    –Bibhuti Nepal

    My immediate reactions to Mr. Bijay Raut’s proposal that Nepal should join the Indian Union were anger and disgust. I thought Bijay Raut was a betrayer and a pro-Indian activist. However, after several thoughts, I have reached conclusions that Mr. Raut has very good points and his hypothesis deserves serious attentions.

    Joining India will be unthinkable and unacceptable to any patriotic Nepali. The stories of the alleged Indian attempt of encroachment of the Nepalese territories are still fresh in our memories. However, let’s now put aside those grievances for a while and try to focus, analyze and debate objectively on a single question: Should Nepal make effort to gain statehood in the Indian Union (Like Puerto Rico is attempting to be the USA’s 51th state)? In other words, should Nepal join the Indian Union?

    I know many people have and will argue against this proposal. But let me take this opportunity to argue for the proposal.

    In my humble opinion, Nepal should join India for the following major reasons:

    1. The purchasing power of the Nepalese consumers will instantly INCREASE by 60% since Indian Rs. 100 will no longer be Nepalese Rs. 160. IRs. 100 will be equivalent to NRs. 100. The Nepalese consumers will get the Indian goods for at least 60% cheaper value than before while sell their products to Indians at higher than previous values.

    2. Since India is our major trading partner (about 2/3 of the total trade are with India), our economy will largely benefit from the increase in strength of our currency. The current trade deficit will be less painful to our economy then.

    3. India is often accused of encroaching not only our land but also our culture, language and values. Now if Nepal becomes a part of India, what will India encroach? It’s own land!! The culture of both Nepal and India will flourish as well as assimilate better than now. India, if nothing else, represents a remarkable example of cultural, ethnic and linguistic assimilation. Furthermore, Nepali is already an official language of India, i.e., Nepali is included in the 8th Schedule of the Indian Constitution.

    4. For Hindus, India is “Mecca” and “Madina.” Non-Hindus — Cheer up! The Secular Indian State won’t marginalize your religious rights as they have been in the Hindu Kingdom of Nepal.



    5. Nepal will be a separate state of India and not a part of U.P., Bihar or West Bengal. This means Nepal can exercise almost all of her present rights other than the one involving territorial disputes with China or other Indian States, in which case the Federal Government of India (which in turn is not under control of any dominant group in India, but headed by the representatives of all states of the Indian Union) will take the charge. Under Indian Constitution, states are granted vital rights ranging from levying of the taxes to maintaining internal security, as well as deriving own educational and cultural policies.Nepal should be glad to become a part of the larger body. Any achievement of India will automatically be the achievement of Nepalis and vice versa.

    6. While state leaders of Nepal will work hard to improve the lives of Nepalis, it will be the responsibility of the Federal government of India to counsel the policies of the states, promulgate federal policies for the whole country, provide the Nepalese state with frequent funds as well as take the immediate charge of the natural emergencies like flood, earthquake, etc. The state leaders of Nepal will have better chance of building the Nepalese nation than now, since there will always be someone at the back for assistance and guidance.

    7. The largest natural resource we have is water. Unfortunately, the amount of hydro-electricity generated from it is minimal. The Arun -III, the multi-billion dollar hydro electricity project, was terminated because The World Bank drew off its support, primarily due to the lost of the Bank’s faith in the Nepalese government that was characterized by sharp political instability. The Federal Government of India, with its huge budget and capacity to lure large multinationals and international lending agencies, can easily get several of such Hydo-Power projects going. This will but benefit Nepal and Nepalis in large because the electricity will now be sold not only to China but to several other Indian states with very little hassles.

    8. The legendary Gurkha soldiers, who now constitute a significant portion of the Indian Army, are working not for their motherland but for a foreign land. These Gurkhas, in one sense, are not soldiers but just mercenaries (hired army motivated by money rather than love for motherland or national glory). If Nepal were to be a part of India, these brave soldiers would be working for their motherland and their bravery will count as glory and not just paid service.

    9. One may argue against the proposal of the unification by saying that India has very little incentive to have Nepal as its state because India will have to guard hundreds of miles of the Nepal-China frontier, which might suck up its already strained military and economic resources. This is not true. India has already been guarding the China-Nepal frontier indirectly. Just imagine when China invades Nepal, do you think India will sit down there and keep watching? Never. Directly or Indirectly, India has and will have to guard the Nepal-China frontier. In case Nepal becomes a part of India, India will have to divert little extra of its military resources to the frontier.

    10. Finally, I believe, and many of you will agree, that Nepal lacks resources to function as an independent country. About three quarters of the country’s land is mountainous, and the fertile quarter is over populated and prone to erosion, flood, and other ecological hazards. Two-third of the population is illiterate while over 40% live below poverty line. The majority of educated population is unproductive since they are stuck up in the inefficient government services. Natural resource other than water is rare and tourism sector is on the verge of decline because of the negative ecological impacts as well as polluted cities. Furthermore, Nepal has one of the highest per capital foreign debt despite she gets large sums of foreign grants each year. The remittances of the Gurkha soldiers and that of Non-Resident Nepali are not enough to support economy, and there has been continual migration of Nepali, both seasonal and permanent, to India and other countries in search of work and other economic opportunities. Nepal definitely needs both
    “guidance” and “assistance” of the Federal Government to boost up its economy and maximize the utility of her limited resources. Only unification with India will bestow Nepal with such power and opportunity.

    Please feel free to agree/disagree with my comments.

    Ten Reasons Why Nepal Should Join India « Madhesi – United We Stand
     
  2.  
  3. Nirvana

    Nirvana Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2012
    Messages:
    343
    Likes Received:
    147
    Location:
    Mumbai
    Thing's changed in Nepal since the Communist party came to Power !!
     
  4. civfanatic

    civfanatic Retired Moderator

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2009
    Messages:
    4,562
    Likes Received:
    2,526
    Location:
    తెలంగాణ
    I for one will welcome Nepal if it ever joins India. Akhand Bharat and all that.

    Perhaps then all the ignorant comments by foreigners that 'Buddha was not Indian because he was born a few kilometers away from the modern border' will cease!
     
  5. Mad Indian

    Mad Indian Proud Bigot Veteran Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2012
    Messages:
    12,830
    Likes Received:
    7,524
    Location:
    Podigai Hills.
    This is the power of ECONOMIC Growth..... Of course if they want to become a part of India, We should welcome them with OPEN arms......:thumb::thumb:

    Lets see what holds in the future......
     
  6. Mad Indian

    Mad Indian Proud Bigot Veteran Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2012
    Messages:
    12,830
    Likes Received:
    7,524
    Location:
    Podigai Hills.
    They cant stay in power forever.... Even if they remain in power it wont SERIOUSLY dent our relations with them... for instance we recently renewed our friendship treaty with them.....
     
  7. Bangalorean

    Bangalorean Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
    Messages:
    6,207
    Likes Received:
    6,497
    Do look at the comments though... lot of Nepalis hate the idea.
     
  8. KS

    KS Bye bye DFI Veteran Member

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2010
    Messages:
    8,008
    Likes Received:
    5,718
    Location:
    irrelevant
    No wonder both Bijay Raut and Bibhuti Nepali are Madhesis. Madhesis are the closest to Indian ethnically and linguistically and they will not find either Nepal or India much different. But the other ethnic groups like Gorkhas, Brahmans will find the idea absolutely ridiculous and unacceptable.

    The best way deal with Nepal is to make it our client state and ensure the Madhesis always stay in power.



    So you have had your encounter with the Noodle Dragon...:lol:
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2012
  9. Tshering22

    Tshering22 Sikkimese Saber Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2010
    Messages:
    4,404
    Likes Received:
    2,783
    Location:
    Gangtok, Sikkim, India
    Bad idea right now man. A Union sort of thing like EU is fine but a country joining would be not good. We are not economically powerful enough yet to handle another country joining in. What's more, we will have even longer borders with China. As if we don't have enough trouble with them already.
     
    ashdoc likes this.
  10. Tshering22

    Tshering22 Sikkimese Saber Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2010
    Messages:
    4,404
    Likes Received:
    2,783
    Location:
    Gangtok, Sikkim, India
    On the lighter side:

    [​IMG]


    Is taking shape...:devil:
     
    maomao, SPIEZ and Mad Indian like this.
  11. Nirvana

    Nirvana Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2012
    Messages:
    343
    Likes Received:
    147
    Location:
    Mumbai
    :tsk: I just had a look , Very negative response !
     
  12. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,117
    Likes Received:
    23,545
    Location:
    Somewhere
    I would say India should join Nepal!
     
  13. Mad Indian

    Mad Indian Proud Bigot Veteran Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2012
    Messages:
    12,830
    Likes Received:
    7,524
    Location:
    Podigai Hills.
    But sir he has already pointed out that we are invariably supposed to intervene in Nepal should the Chinis ever interfere... So It wont put much ADDITIONAL burden....
     
  14. Mad Indian

    Mad Indian Proud Bigot Veteran Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2012
    Messages:
    12,830
    Likes Received:
    7,524
    Location:
    Podigai Hills.
    Like i said, If And only IF they want.... But for that we have to become a developed super power nation first...
     
  15. The Messiah

    The Messiah Bow Before Me! Elite Member

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2010
    Messages:
    10,788
    Likes Received:
    4,552
    :nono:

    you forgot indonesia
     
    ashdoc, balai_c and Mad Indian like this.
  16. sukhish

    sukhish Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2009
    Messages:
    1,087
    Likes Received:
    258
    now this should be our ultimate goal. I think slowly and steadly we are getting there.
     
  17. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2009
    Messages:
    24,274
    Likes Received:
    11,287
    Location:
    BANGalore
    I really don't want any other nation to be assimilated into India.
     
  18. amoy

    amoy Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2010
    Messages:
    5,524
    Likes Received:
    1,548
    Ten Reasons, are quite convincing , at least for me. :p Sometimes I'm wondering why Mexico doesn't join the US of A. Anyway it's a matter of time Mexicans / Hispanic tops their demography.

    As for the pro India Madhesis isn't it only a tiny group? And Gorkha, I used to think they were deployed by the Brit for overseas colonies but wasn't aware India also hired them for military. Why ? Your human resource is affluent yourself.

    What has changed over the years since 1998? Those hydro power projects? And India as No.1 trading partner?
     
  19. anoop_mig25

    anoop_mig25 Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2009
    Messages:
    5,195
    Likes Received:
    2,223
    no indian is better what is know except of that Pok/askai chin . tibet should be free and off course . bachulistian
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2012
  20. Bangalorean

    Bangalorean Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
    Messages:
    6,207
    Likes Received:
    6,497
    Gurkhas are known to be awesome soldiers. That is why even India recruits them for the Army, as does Britain.
     
  21. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,117
    Likes Received:
    23,545
    Location:
    Somewhere
    The issue of one country joining another could be attributed to the same psyche that one finds on the cyberspace of drawing scenarios 'to "wargame" various threats and India's response'. It is possibly drawn from the desire of playing Napoleon or Montgomery in their own mindspace. Timepass, I would say and not to be taken seriously.

    The history of Nepal is quite interesting. Gurkhas claim descent from the Hindu Rajputs and Brahmins of Northern India, who entered modern Nepal from the west. The Rana dynasty, which made the King of Nepal a mere figurehead, hails from the Sisodiya Rajput Royal family of Chittor now Udaipur in India, capital of the Mewar region. The dynasty traces its roots to Maharaj Kumbhakaran Singh of Chittor, Mewar. Maharaj Kumbhakaran Singh was the younger brother of Rana Ratan Singh of Mewar. Many also fled to Nepal after the failed 1857 Sepoy Mutiny to avoid the British wrath. The Royal families of India have intermarried into the Nepal Royal Family and vice versa.

    Therefore, there is much affinity in many respect between India and Nepal.

    However, it does not mean that as a corollary, Nepal has to become a State of India.

    Madhesis comprise about 40% of the total population of Nepal. Madhesi people are ethnically, culturally and lingually similar to people of Bihar and eastern Uttar Pradesh states of India.

    Gurkhas have been in the forerunner of the . Indian Army right from the time of the Pinadri Wars of 1817, though under the East India Company flag. They have been serving the Indian Army ever since. On India's independence, The Tripartite Agreement between the United Kingdom, India and Nepal was a treaty signed in 1947 concerning the rights of Gurkhas in military service.

    It was agreed that Gurkhas in British and Indian service should enjoy broadly the same conditions of service, to ensure that there was no unfair advantage to serving in one or other, thus maintaining economic stability and social harmony in the Gurkha recruiting areas.

    The main points of the agreement are:

    The Gurkha soldier must be recruited as a Nepali citizen, must serve as a Nepali citizen, and must be resettled as a Nepali citizen.

    All religious and cultural observances must be preserved in accordance with the demands of the Hindu faith.

    Gurkha soldiers in both the Indian and British Armies should receive the same basic rates of pay, although allowances may be paid to reflect differences in the costs of living between countries where Gurkha soldiers might serve outside Nepal.

    Subject to satisfactory performance and conduct, all soldiers should be allowed to serve for sufficient time in order to qualify for a pension

    All Gurkha soldiers should be allowed an extended period of leave in Nepal every three years.

    Gurkha soldiers recruited into the respective armies are liable for service worldwide.

    Gurkhas are fully integrated into the Army to which they are recruited and under no circumstances are they to be considered mercenaries.

    The distribution of the Gorkha units at the time of Partition was:

    Indian Army
    1st King George V's Own Gurkha Rifles (The Malaun Regiment)
    3rd Queen Alexandra's Own Gurkha Rifles
    4th Prince of Wales's Own Gurkha Rifles
    5th Royal Gurkha Rifles (Frontier Force)
    8th Gurkha Rifles
    9th Gurkha Rifles

    British Army

    2nd King Edward VII's Own Gurkha Rifles (The Sirmoor Rifles)
    6th Gurkha Rifles
    7th Gurkha Rifles
    10th Gurkha Rifles
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2012
    ashdoc, parijataka and panduranghari like this.

Share This Page