Taiwan confirms mass producing cruise missiles

Discussion in 'China' started by LETHALFORCE, Dec 10, 2010.

  1. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Taiwan_confirms_mass_producing_cruise_missiles_999.html

    Taiwan has confirmed for the first time that it is mass-producing cruise missiles, despite fast warming ties with China.

    "Mass production of indigenous weapons like the ones under the code names of 'Chichun' (Lance Hawk) and 'Chuifeng' (Chasing Wind) is very smooth," Deputy Defence Minister Chao Shih-chang told parliament Wednesday.

    "The problems with key parts and components that had previously stalled the manufacturing have been tackled," he said in reply to queries raised by legislator Lin Yu-fang.

    The Chichun project refers to the Hsiungfeng 2E cruise missile, Taiwan's answer to the US-made Tomahawk. Chuifeng is a project to develop the island's long-anticipated supersonic anti-ship missile.

    Chao declined to specify the range of the missiles or the number to be put into service.

    "Surely the cruise missiles will be able to boost Taiwan's self-defence capabilities," Alexdander Huang, a professor of Tamkang University in Taipei, told AFP.

    "But that's it. Taiwan is unlikely to use such weapons to take the first strike against the targets on the mainland."

    The cruise missiles could be launched from land or sea, and would be capable of hitting airports and missile bases in southeast China, as well as cities such as Shanghai and Hong Kong, local media said.

    Taiwanese experts estimate China's People's Liberation Army currently has more than 1,600 missiles aimed at the island.

    Tensions across the Taiwan Strait have eased since Ma Ying-jeou of the China-friendly Kuomintang came to power in 2008 on a platform of beefing up trade links and allowing in more Chinese tourists.

    However, China still refuses to renounce the possible use of force against the island in its long-stated goal of re-taking Taiwan, which has ruled itself since the end of a civil war in 1949.

    The Pentagon said in an annual report to Congress earlier this year that China's military build-up against Taiwan has "continued unabated" despite improving political relations.
     
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  3. sayareakd

    sayareakd Moderator Moderator

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    may be some barter trade with Prithvi is need of the hour till nirbhay come along...........
     
  4. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    If Taiwan can mass producing why aren't we??
     
  5. badguy2000

    badguy2000 Respected Member Senior Member

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    it is "mass-assemble",instead of "mass-producing".

    its core components have to be imported.
     
  6. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    either way they are assembling, importing, producing whatever word makes you happy ,and getting the final product.
     
  7. kickok1975

    kickok1975 Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    No big deal. This would be last resort of Taiwan military force against main land. Even China government didn't bother to make a comment.
     
  8. sayareakd

    sayareakd Moderator Moderator

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    China and Taiwan is one country so finally the missiles will come to china till such time, they have to wait.
     
  9. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Taiwan_trumpets_cruise_missile_production_999.html

    Taiwan trumpets cruise missile production


    Taiwan has admitted that it is mass producing long-range cruise missiles capable of reaching mainland China.

    The announcement, made by Chao Shih-chang, Taiwans' deputy defense minister, confirms years of speculation by military analysts that the island was developing the Hsiung Feng 2E land attack cruise missile and the Hsiung Feng 3 anti-ship cruise missile.

    The announcement also signals lingering military tension between Taiwan and China despite a thawing in political and economic ties in recent years.

    Military analysts suggest the announcement marked a major break in Taiwan's long-standing strategy of preparing to thwart possible Chinese military attacks across the Taiwan Straits, developing, instead, a retaliatory capability as far-reaching as mainland China.

    China and Taiwan split at the end of a civil war in 1949. Beijing, however, considers Taiwan a breakaway province that must be brought back into the fold. It has used a number of means, diplomatic and military, to deter other nations from officially recognizing Taiwan as an independent state.

    Even so, relations between both sides have increasingly thawed, allowing Taiwan to pursue trade deals with other countries that have long been reluctant to antagonize Beijing.

    Speaking to legislators, Chao said that "mass production" was "going smoothly." He refused to elaborate.

    A senior official quoted by the Defense News Web site said that "a few [missiles] have been fielded and could be fielded in a case of war."

    China continues to retain more than 1,000 ballistic missiles pointed at Taiwan and while Beijing traditionally accuses Washington of aiding Taipei, it hasn't issued a response to Taiwan's cruise missile production.

    Washington has tried to bolster Taiwan's defenses, including selling the Taiwanese $6 billion worth of missile defense systems in a deal announced last January, while allaying China's concerns of relations being undermined. Beijing though has urged the U.S. administration to reconsider the move, threatening the suspension of military contacts with the United States as well as slapping sanctions on companies manufacturing the weapons bound for Taiwan.

    Washington is required under the Taiwan Relations Act to ensure that Taiwan can defend itself. The United States remains the island's top arms supplier.

    A leading lawmaker and member of Taiwan's defense council said the missiles weren't intended to threaten China. Still, Lin Yu-fang said: "We have to be pragmatists. It will take time to persuade China to remove those missiles."

    "I think at long last Beijing will come to realize that to remove those missiles will be in their best interest, it will help promote their image as a major power in East Asia," Lin was quoted saying by The Wall Street Journal.

    The legislators said the timing of the announcement was irrelevant to brewing military tension North and South Korea and their respective allies, China and the United States.
     

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