Syria: Dozens dead in bloodiest day of protests

Discussion in 'West Asia & Africa' started by Nonynon, Apr 23, 2011.

  1. Nonynon

    Nonynon Regular Member

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    http://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7340,L-4059863,00.html

    I don't think Assad can get out of this anymore. Hopefully the Muslim brotherhood will get minimal power in the new Syria.

    Right now there are shootings in the funerals that got atleast 6 new dead protestors (or should we call them rebels?). Dont have an english source yet but heres my hebrew one:
    http://www.ynet.co.il/articles/0,7340,L-4059922,00.html
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2011
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  3. Nonynon

    Nonynon Regular Member

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  4. ejazr

    ejazr Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    I wonder if Obama will try to intervene in Syria like they have done in Libya. The only disadvantage is that Syria doesn't have any oil as compared to Libya. But if the US is seriouly conernced with spreading Democratic govt.s then getting rid of Assad would rank in priority with Gaddafi. And unlike removing Mubarak both Israel and GCC countries would be happy with the removal of Assad in Syria.
     
  5. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    I really doubt that ejaz. Even in Libya the feeling is that US involvement is half hearted. I doubt they will stretch themselves so far, though they will support anyone else doing that.
     
  6. Nonynon

    Nonynon Regular Member

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    I don't think the Syrian uprising is a good thing for Israel, the Muslim brotherhood is most likely to take things over and the Syrian public opinion is that Assad is a coward for not invading the Israeli Golan. If anything, I'd like to see an uprising in Jordan and the country getting it's proper name Palestine.
     
  7. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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    A new endgame in Syria

    A new endgame in Syria

    The end of 2011 for Syrians protesting against President Bashar Al Assad may not have brought the change they hoped for but their resolve to continue their movement into next year remains strong.
    Undeterred by the continued killings despite the presence of the Arab League monitors currently in the country to assess the ground situation, Syrian activists called for mass rallies on Friday. They are obviously determined to provide first hand testimony of the government’s brutal repression to the visiting team of observers.


    So far the observers headed by Sudanese veteran General Mustafa Al-Dabi have not raised much hue and cry. In fact, General Dabi’s initial views of the situation, which he called “reassuring so far” has disappointed the opposition alliance, the Syrian National Council. The opposition while cognisant of the government’s plans to control the observers’ movements to prevent them from witnessing the reality is still hopeful of bringing truth to light. The observers’ mission is the first step in the implementation of the Arab League plan aimed at ending the strife. Its importance cannot be undermined for its findings are to form the basis of the enactment of the League’s plan to end the fighting and pave the way for negotiations. This is hardly achievable until both the government and the opposition backed by the Free Syrian Army put down arms and agree to talk. While the opposition’s fears of the observers’ mission being sabotaged by Assad cannot be dismissed, recent events have proven that the situation is transparent enough for them to form an independent judgment. For one the violence has continued as have the protests. But the worrisome factor is how easily the determined stand on either side could further raise the stakes in this bloody fight that shows no signs of abatement.


    However, with regional and international focus turned on Syria, Assad’s decision to allow the observers as part of the agreement to end the implosive crisis is a breakthrough. While hell bent on crushing dissent, Assad cannot be unaware of his isolation and loosening grip on power. It is this very fact that may have forced him to agree to the plan in the first place. It is therefore hoped that Assad steps back from his maximalist position and makes the move towards a political settlement.

    Source: A new endgame in Syria
     
  8. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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