‘Surrendering militants got Rs 268.1m’

Discussion in 'Defence & Strategic Issues' started by Neo, Feb 26, 2009.

  1. Neo

    Neo Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2009
    Messages:
    4,030
    Likes Received:
    764
    Location:
    Amsterdam


    NEW DELHI: The Indian government has handed out Rs 21.7 million as incentives for 250 militants who have surrendered before security forces in Indian-held Kashmir since 2006 – while in the militancy-affected seven northeastern states of India during the same period, 3,304 militants laid down their weapons in exchange for Rs 246.4 million.

    Replying to a question in Lok Sabha, State Minister for Home Sriprakash Jaiswal said under the government policy, a monthly stipend of Rs 2,000 was given to the militants who surrendered for three years. He said an immediate grant of Rs 150,000 was also kept aside as fixed deposit, and could be drawn on the completion of the three-year period subject to good behaviour.
     
  2.  
  3. Rage

    Rage DFI TEAM Stars and Ambassadors

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2009
    Messages:
    5,381
    Likes Received:
    938
    Neo, if your purpose (as it seems) by the article is to insinuate that India's policy on Maoist surrenders is akin to Pakistan's policy of financial compensation to the Taliban, then it is not. Here is why:

    - The INR 268.1 million transferred to militants in Kashmir and the North-east over a protracted period of 3 years was a form of financial rehabilitation intended to ensure that the militants would completely abandon their guerrilla war and enter mainstream civilian life. This is evident in that the policy was implemented firstly in the form of a general amnesty, an immediate grant (to both extricate themselves from their precarious involvement with militancy and to serve as an incentive) and a monthly stipend (for sustenance and to give them a financial leg-up as it were).

    - As opposed to this, the USD 6 million handed over by Pakistan to the Taliban was for a mere cessation of hostilities: an 'indefinite ceasefire' - not, as is commonly supposed, for laying down arms or disbanding... or even adopting a permanent, lasting ceasefire. The money was also handed over to the militia in: a) its entirety, meaning that individual repatriation for relinquishing militancy is an impossibility; and b) and as a whole, implying that there is no guarantee that such could not be used to mitigate the TTP's losses, or procure more weapons or even recruit even more insurgents to augment their depleted strength. The two policies are entirely different, their goals and methods of implementation completely divergent, and therefore the expected short and long-term results incomparable- a difference that is self-evident if one would only read the article instead of merely getting a hard-on at its title.

    - In the Indian case, the transfer was also subject to a non-return to recalcitrance, monitored and observed closely by the relevant state enforcement agencies. Moreover, the immediate grant was locked in fixed deposits subject to a three year probation, and forfeited upon even the slightest suspicion of taking up arms against the state. In other words, the policy is both political and economic, as well as social in terms of being rehabilitative: an excellent strategy all in all since the Maoist conflict is primarily an economic and social one.

    - On the other hand, the Pakistani transfer was contingent upon the declaration of an 'indefinite' ceasefire, the amount handed over in lumpsum, and furthermore (and troublingly so) not subject to any conditions of either monitoring, relinquishment or submission. If anything, the Taliban have indicated their intention to continue waging low-level insurgency against the p'stani state and target assassinations against p'stani politicians as is evident in this post as of Feb 24th. Since then there has also been tribal violence that killed 14 in Dera Ismael Khan, yet more bomb blasts in Darra Adam Khel and Kohat, multiple rockets fired at a police outpost in Mattani, as well as an incident today involving the Taliban stopping your forces from entering Mingora by planting roadside bombs in the Balogram area....and this is not even an exhaustive account.

    There is far more to this than meets the eye, unless the Pakistani government has begun a policy of unconditional and foolish prostration of itself before militants.
     
  4. Rage

    Rage DFI TEAM Stars and Ambassadors

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2009
    Messages:
    5,381
    Likes Received:
    938
  5. EnlightenedMonk

    EnlightenedMonk Member of The Month JULY 2009 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2009
    Messages:
    3,831
    Likes Received:
    21
    Quite an innovative solution... never heard of this one before... and, it does seem to have yielded results in the valley and the NE if the number of attacks are to be used to base assessment on....
     
  6. Payeng

    Payeng Daku Mongol Singh

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2009
    Messages:
    2,521
    Likes Received:
    767
    Location:
    Neistan
    This process is going on in North East form a long time IIRC from the days of AGP in power especially in Assam. The surrendered ULFA are so called SULFA
    are also permitted to carry a fire arms with them, it is learnt that they also assist the army to hunt down ULFA militants.
     
  7. EnlightenedMonk

    EnlightenedMonk Member of The Month JULY 2009 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2009
    Messages:
    3,831
    Likes Received:
    21
    Any idea of the success of this process in the valley?

    It may be very successful in the NE, but according to me, the terrorists in the valley are brainwashed religious extremists, so it might not work on them...
     
  8. Payeng

    Payeng Daku Mongol Singh

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2009
    Messages:
    2,521
    Likes Received:
    767
    Location:
    Neistan
    It had led to surrender of militants so it can be said as a succes, but it is not a ultimate solution nor it should be the goal otherwise it may subject to negative results.

    However militants in the NE region are more due to unemployement and frustration so this mechanism might yeild some results initially. Regarding kashmiri jihadi groups they are influenced by socio-religous sentiments and the misunderstanding of Jihadi principles, so it doesn't seems like a solution either but I personally fill such compensation should be available to start a new life for those brave souls who decides love above haterd.
     
  9. EnlightenedMonk

    EnlightenedMonk Member of The Month JULY 2009 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2009
    Messages:
    3,831
    Likes Received:
    21
    Yep, NDTV recently during the Kashmir elections showed the report of a Hizbul Mujhahideen who'd surrendered a few years ago and how he'd used the compensation to make his life better. Sure, he acknowledged that the going wasn't exactly easy, but he thought it was worth it.

    The money really seems to be changing some of the militants' life for the better. But, as you said, and I had also earlier mentioned, this might work for the NE region, but this will not work with brainwashed religious extremists...

    For the Kashmir valley, we ought to use the "carrot and stick policy". Both the money and the stick in case they don't toe the line...
     

Share This Page