SUPARCO news and updates

Discussion in 'Pakistan' started by Indx TechStyle, Jan 30, 2016.

  1. Indx TechStyle

    Indx TechStyle Perfaarmance Naarmal Senior Member

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    Hey, I'm an Indian not know much about space capabilities and current- future space programs and missions of SUPARCO.
    Want you guys to post here if there's any update. We won't troll you if you don't bring India into the thread.



    @Neo @DEJAVU @Dazzler @Zarvan and whoever be other Pakistani member here.
    I will also post some updates if could got any.
    Could be Pakistani remote sensing, satellite or any long term target.

    @gslv markIII @HariPrasad-1 @Gessler
    We know about their limited capabilities so let's not troll them and let the discussion run healthy.
    @Sakal Gharelu Ustad Asking you to make it a sticky thread of it crosses 10 pages.
     
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  3. Indx TechStyle

    Indx TechStyle Perfaarmance Naarmal Senior Member

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    Dr Abdus Salam and all the wrong choices Pakistan made

    [​IMG]
    Today is the 90th birthday of Dr Abdus Salam. The best way to wish him is to let freedom of religion and intellectual thought prevail in the country. PHOTO: YOUTUBE SCREENSHOT
    29 Jan 2016
    What does it take to be a genius?

    The other day this thought struck me. Is it the environment that nurtures the genius or does nature simply endow certain individuals with a special gene? Maybe both propositions have merits of their own, but for the time being, let’s drop the latter. Let’s suppose there are no chosen ones, there are no saviours.

    The idea of saviours arises when we start to believe in pseudo-science and seek miracles to solve our problems. But mind it, Aladdin’s lamp or magic wands don’t exist in the practical world. The only magic that works is the labour of hands at the end of one’s own arms and the thinking brain in one’s own head.

    The third-world countries need the same magic for their socio-economic development; self-reliance, hard work and stimulating intellectual environment. Mix these ingredients and a successful society will develop. Pakistan, I regret, still misses these elements, and hence, is still far from being developed.

    Today, at the 90th birthday of the first noble laureate of Pakistan, Dr Abdus Salam, it would be wise to take a look at his life and to introspect what wrong choices we made.

    Salam was a genius for the world, nonetheless a discarded one in his own country. Born in a village near Jhang on January 29, 1926, he studied in an ordinary Urdu medium school that lacked furniture. He belonged to a lower-middle class family. His house had no electricity, or any other basic facilities. His circumstances were challenging, yet they never served as an excuse.

    The fact that he scored the highest marks ever recorded for the matriculation examination at the age of 14 and published his first research paper at the age of 17 indicated his gifted potential. But who, at that time, could have imagined that this young prodigy would have received the most prestigious Nobel Prize in Physics for his contribution to the unification theory.
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    Dr Abdus Salam recieves the Nobel Prize for Physics from King Carl XVI Gustav of Sweden on December 10, 1979. Photo: ahmadiyyapost.blogspot.com
    The list of awards and honours which he received and his contribution to Pakistan need a separate volume. Some of his services, for instance, include working as the science advisor for President Ayub Khan to lay the infrastructure of science in Pakistan. He persuaded him to acquire Karachi Nuclear Power Plant (KANUPP) – the first commercial nuclear reactor of Pakistan. He served as a founding director of Pakistan Space and Upper Atmosphere Research Commission (SUPARCO), worked for the establishment of Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC) and The Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH). Not to mention that he mentored the scientist who designed the atomic bomb for Pakistan.

    Not only was his unification theory a touchstone of modern physics, he also laid the pioneering work for the discovery of Higgs boson (referred to as the God-particle) in 2012 which happens to be the most important discovery in Physics in the last four decades. This discovery took place at the Large Hadron Collider established at CERN, a European organisation for nuclear research.

    Last year on July 31st, Pakistan became the first non-European country to become an associate member of CERN. In his recent visit to CERN, Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif hailed the contribution of Pakistani scientists, and also paid tribute to Salam calling him the pride of the country.

    This statement, however, couldn’t wash out the stain of guilt that the subsequent governments of Pakistan and the entire nation still carry. While the entire world applauded him, Salam was never regarded as a hero in his own country. He’s considered the opposite – a traitor.

    What we did to Salam is shameful to say the least. When he returned to Pakistan after receiving the Nobel Prize, no one received him at the airport. Right wing propaganda concocted conspiracy theories to accuse him of nuclear espionage. When he was invited to Quaid-e-Azam University for his lecture, he was threatened by the fundamentalist students. Ziaul Haq refused to endorse the candidature of Salam as a Director General of UNESCO even though Salam visited nearly 30 countries in 1987 and gained their support. In 1988, the then Prime Minister, Benazir Bhutto, refused to meet him after making him wait for two days in a hotel. Similarly, Nawaz Sharif, in his first term of premiership, conveniently ignored Salam while mentioning the distinguished alumni of Government College, Lahore while addressing its convocation. Had Salam given up his Pakistani nationality, he would have easily avoided such humiliations, but he remained a Pakistani national until his last breath.

    Salam’s biggest failure was not some personal tragedy – a person of his stature with generosity of spirit could forgive personal sufferings. His agony was due to a far bigger tragedy. Salam dreamt of establishing an international research centre in Pakistan for third-world physicists. He wanted to stop the brain-drain, but no government showed interest. He ended up setting up the International Centre for Theoretical Physics in Trieste, Italy that was later renamed the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics.

    All of this took a toll on him, and in last years of his life, he became the victim of a neurological disorder and was confined to a wheelchair. He died in Oxford, England on November 21, 1996. He was buried in Pakistan on his request. No government official attended his funeral. His misery didn’t end with his death. The epitaph of his tombstone was defaced as a final disgrace to remove the word ‘Muslim’from it.
    [​IMG]
    Defaced tombstone on Dr Abdus Salam’s grave. Photo: Aziz Bilal

    If we look back in history, the Mongols invaded Baghdad and demolished Baitul Hikmah, a centre of excellence during the Islamic Golden Age. Ibn-e-Rushd was exiled and his books were burnt. When Europe found the light to get out of the Dark Ages, the Muslim world lost its way. And now the country where Salam was banned from delivering his lectures in universities is witnessing terrorism in those very educational institutes.

    I again seek your attention towards the dilemma that I mentioned in the start: What does it take to be a genius in any society?

    There are no chosen ones, there are no saviours.

    For socio-economic development, self-reliance, hard work and a stimulating intellectual environment is required. Where there is no such environment, there are no scholars, there are no intellectuals and there are no heroes. Even if someone, like Salam, somehow manages to prove his talent, he would not be treated as a hero. He would be shunned.

    Today is the 90th birthday of Dr Abdus Salam. The best way to wish him is to let freedom of religion and intellectual thought prevail in the country.
     
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  4. Indx TechStyle

    Indx TechStyle Perfaarmance Naarmal Senior Member

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    Pakistani Space Vision 2040.
    Pakistani space agency Space and UPper Atmosphere Research COmmission(SUPARCO) has adopted a long term satellite development program for year 2040 and wants to have 5 Geostationary Satellites by 2040.
    Program was started 2011 with launch of PakSat 1R manufactured by Suparco with the help of China and Indonesia to replace old PakSat 1E.
    Later, more GEO Satellites Planned are
    PakSat-MM1
    PakSat-MM2
    PakSat-II

    Moreover, 6 Remote Sensing Satellites
    PRSS-O1
    PRSS-S1
    PRSS-O2
    PRSS-S2
    PRSS-O3
    PRSS-S3
    are also planned under the program.
    There are currently no plans for a Reusable Space Vehicle or rocket booster but a SLV named Taimur capable of lifting around 80kg to LEO is said to be under development.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Pakistan's National Defence Complex(NDC) is known to be developing this SLV since 2001.
    It is currently known to be housed at MTFR Jhelum near the Tilla Satellite Launch Centre.
    @Neo @Dazzler
    Any further info on you guys' space program.
    I think China gonna launch a Pakistani Satellite in 2018. Which satellite will be that.
    Communication or remote sensing? o_O
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2016
  5. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    A bit of SUPRACO history from pakistan media

    Lagging behind: 2040 - Pakistan’s space od[d]yssey

    KARACHI:
    Fifty years ago, Pakistan’s only Nobel laureate Dr Abdus Salam conceived the idea of the country’s first space research programme and national space agency in 1961.


    But today, the only achievement that Pakistan can boast of is the successful launch of its first fully functional communication satellite, the Paksat-1R, whose first anniversary comes this August.

    This satellite, however, was not indigenously built. China was behind Paksat-1R’s design, built, launch and even funding; only a few components were built by our engineers.

    India, on the other hand, has been able to launch around 60 satellites to date in spite of launching its space programme eight years after Pakistan. It has even managed to launch its own unmanned lunar probe, the Chandrayaan-1, into orbit in 2008.

    So where did we go so wrong in our space programme?

    One of the main differences between India and Pakistan’s space agencies is that while one is headed by scientists, the other is currently headed by retired army generals, and has been for the last 11 years.

    The space agency of Pakistan too initially was headed by scientists and many prominent names had a significant role. The last civilian scientist to have headed the Pakistan Space and Upper Atmosphere Research Commission (Suparco) was Dr Abdul Majid, who planned the Paksat communication satellite system and satellite launch vehicle projects.

    On his retirement in April 2001, Majid handed over charge to Major General (retd) Raza Hussain, whose tenure lasted till August, 2010.

    Since then the Suparco fort is being held by Major General (retd) Ahmed Bilal.

    On the other hand, the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) has throughout its history been manned by scientists. Between 2001 and now, India has managed to launch more than 30 satellites. Pakistan for the same period managed only two satellites, including the Paksat-1, which was an acquired dysfunctional satellite and the current full fledged communication satellite Paksat-1R launched by China in 2011.

    Early years

    It was on Dr Salam’s advice that a Space Sciences Research Wing of the Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC) was established. Later, this wing became known as the Suparco in 1964.

    To understand the significance of Salam’s forward thinking, who was then the scientific advisor to President Ayub, one has to take into account the fact that the world’s first satellite Sputnik-1 was launched just recently in 1957 by Russia and the US was yet to plant its first man on the moon.

    Salam held a meeting with two PAEC scientists Dr Salim Mehmud and Tariq Mustafa, who were studying abroad in 1960 in Washington, and revealed that the Pakistan government had approved a classified mission to begin its own space research programme. He advised the two young scientists to join NASA to study rocket science.

    NASA, during those years, was in a race to put an American on the moon. In this connection, they invited Pakistan along with other countries to participate in their project. NASA provided the two scientists with rocket components to take back home along with training and support on the condition that their findings would be shared.

    It was in this connection that the Rahber series of rockets were launched from Sonmiani Rocket Range in June, 1962 that conducted experiments on the Earth’s atmosphere at a height of 130 kilometers. Later, the Shahper series was also launched that conducted experiments at a height of 150kms above the surface of earth.

    Also, in the 60s, a Doppler radar tracking station was established in the country as part of a global network.

    New facilities and labs were set up that received Spanish beacon satellites, and feeds from an application satellite that had been relocated in 1975 by Nasa over the Indian ocean for one year.

    In 1973, American Apollo 17 astronauts Eugene A Cernan (Commander), Ronald E Evans (Command Module Pilot) and Harrison H Schmitt (Lunar Module Pilot) visited Karachi amid great fanfare. It was also during the 1970s that the Islamabad Ionospheric Station within Quaid-e-Azam University was set up and the NASA Landsat ground station was established near Rawat.

    Everything, it seemed, was moving in the right direction.

    Suparco under Zia

    After General Ziaul Haq usurped power, he promulgated the Suparco Ordinance No. XX of 1981, which granted the body autonomous status.

    During the same period, a communication satellite project called Paksat was initiated.

    Also, a 10-meter diameter satellite ground station for interception of satellite transmissions was set up in 1983 that was mainly designed against India.

    A leading scientist told The Express Tribune that back then, the idea was to launch a satellite that could stage a ‘cultural counter attack’ on India with the influx of new Pakistani TV channels.

    But when Gen Zia visited the Suparco headquarters in 1984, he announced an abrupt end to the Paksat project citing a lack of funds. It was during this period that many scientists associated with Suparco left the organisation. Funds were frozen, and there was a complete lack of innovation.

    Satellite mystery

    Some scientists, however, refused to quit and carried on. It was during this period that two ground stations in Karachi and Lahore were set up in 1986 in preparation for the launch of Badr-1, which was an experimental low earth orbiting satellite.

    It was eventually launched on 16 July 1990 from China using the Long March 2E launcher and completed its designed life for around 35 days.

    The country’s second satellite Badr-B was then launched after much delay on 10 Dec 2001 from the Baikonour Cosmodrome, Kazakistan.

    An insider within Suparco says that to this day no one knows what exactly happened to the satellite when contact was lost with it. The cause was never fully investigated.

    Expired orbital slots

    When Pakistan failed to launch its Paksat satellites, the two orbital slots 38 E longitude and 41 E longitude acquired for it in the Geo Synchronous Orbit expired in 1994.

    A new application for the allocation of five GSo slots (38E, 41E, 30E, 88E and 101E) was filed. Although granted, Pakistan faced the risk of losing its priority 38 E slot, if it didn’t launch its own satellite by April 2003.

    Paksat-I

    In December 2002, Pakistan acquired a satellite from the American satellite-building firm Hughes Global Systems (HGS) at a cost of around five million dollars.

    HGS had designed a satellite for Indonesia, but after a battery problem occurred making it useless during certain hours of the day, it was sold to Pakistan as Paksat-1.

    Later, General Pervez Musharraf would claim that “Pakistan’s space programme is now ahead of India after the formal launching of Paksat-I and this is due to the hard work of our scientists.”

    2040 vision

    Suparco chairman Maj Gen (retd) Ahmed Bilal, in an interview with The Express Tribune, said that Pakistani scientists were ‘on a learning curve’ which was why they chose to ‘fast forward’ their expertise with the help of the Chinese for Paksat-1R.

    He clarified that China had given a soft loan for Paksat-1R, whereas all the cost of the ground control facilities within Pakistan were borne by the government of Pakistan.

    Bilal remained vague on Suparco’s history, saying, “Yes, mistakes were made in the past, but we have to move ahead.”

    When asked about the Vision 2040 programme that was approved by the ousted prime minister Yousaf Raza Gilani in January 2012, he said: “we should be able to make, produce and launch our own satellite [in the future]. That is our hallmark [sic].”

    He said the Paksat-1R has a life span of 15 years and his suggestion was to have another communication satellite in space by 2021.

    “National demands will dictate the number of satellites the country needs,” he said.

    He said that Pakistan should have at least three remote sensing satellites that should be launched every three years.

    “We will be focusing on different types of remote sensing satellites and their applications in the next seven-eight years.”

    But if Suparco’s vision for 2040 is limited to building and launching our own satellite, one wonders how far ahead the rest of the world will be in the space race by then.

    Published in The Express Tribune, August 1st, 2012.
     
  6. Illusive

    Illusive Senior Member Senior Member

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    There's no way this thread will cross 10 pages without some trolling cause there's hardly anything worthy to cover SUPARCO, nice name though :biggrin2:
     
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  7. Indx TechStyle

    Indx TechStyle Perfaarmance Naarmal Senior Member

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    No, This thread could cross 10 pages in 50-70 years.
    I'm daily getting lots of News about NASA, ROSCOSMOS, CNSA, ISRO, JaXA and ESA.
    I could post only a little part them here because they are so much.
    Inverse about pakis.
    Most funny thing is that they will be at a stage in 2040 where India was around 80s.
    Well, if watch the "balance" at that time, India will have become developed country meanwhile they will again be seen begging from others. :rofl:
    :biggrin2::biggrin2::biggrin2::biggrin2::biggrin2:
    Some pakis in comment section are more hilarious than this article. :grin:

    They have got a lot of obsession with India.
    Saying, India wins the race, India shakes strategic stability :blah::blah:

    Meanwhile India didn't start any program to race with them. We started it on 70s to match with China and Japan. :lol:
    They have got a strong delusion that our whole strategy revolves around them.
    Don't they? :D
     
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  8. Indx TechStyle

    Indx TechStyle Perfaarmance Naarmal Senior Member

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    @Illusive
    Anyway, next update will come in late 2016(if they really have that rocket named Taimur) or in 2018 when China will be launching their satellite. :D
     
  9. Illusive

    Illusive Senior Member Senior Member

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    There is no race for India, China Japan etc. What we are seeing is natural evolution and growth of the industry. To have an efficient and sustainable space programmes, you need good institutions and funding.

    In pakistan most of their limited funding goes to making nukes and maintaining them thanks to their army. Also their national psyche has never been of being self sufficient but rather being dependent/subservient to other countries and donations. They neither have the institutions to be able to sustain their space programme. This is a country that doesn't accepts failure even if its blatantly visible, they like to live in their comfort zone of lies. Science doesn't thrive in such place.
     
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  10. Indx TechStyle

    Indx TechStyle Perfaarmance Naarmal Senior Member

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    You may have got banned if said this on Pakistani Forum.
    They were talking how their American Aid and Chinese Support which will help them to counter India.
    In that case, I called, how beggars could be compared with India?
    I got a gift as an immediate delete of my reply and my account Howling Wolf banned and deleted forever. :grin:
    I had no idea ki unki itni jal jayegi. :D
     
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  11. salute

    salute Senior Member Senior Member

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    you mean they are trying to steal other nations rocket tech. :laugh:
     
  12. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    paki existence itself is India centered.
    Thats the paki army brainwashing the paki youth by getting involved in all levels of civil society.
     
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  13. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    Taimur whatever!~!

    http://www.b14643.de/Spacerockets_1/Rest_World/Taimur_SLV/Description/Text.htm

    @mod : is there some way I can BLING BLING the text? Want to bling bling the COPY and EXPORT missile part so bad..
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2016
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  14. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    PAKSAT 1E

    Paksat-1,[1] (Other former designation as Palapa C1, HGS-3 and Anatolia 1), is a geosynchronous and communications satellite built and owned by the Boeing Company, leased to the SUPARCO as PakSat. It was successfully put on orbit on 31 January 1996 as "Palapa C1" for Indonesia as its original customer. But, after the technical problems, the satellite was leased to SUPARCO :pound:at an orbital location of 38° East Longitude on December 2001. The PakSat-1 offers the C and Ku band coverage in over 75 countries across Europe, Africa, Middle East, South and Central Asia. Its customers included government organizations,
     
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  15. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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  16. maomao

    maomao Veteran Hunter of Maleecha Senior Member

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    Suparco is the world's best space organization because 1) it is made in pakistan and most importantly 2) it is an islamic space organization create by allah for momeens! This should end any discussions against pakis, as '1)' is a sufficient condition for something to be the best and '2)' is a necessary condition, as this much is enough for something to be best for pakis!

    First mission: 'Ghazwe -e- Chand' written in some arabian book, authored / dictated by some illiterate arab by hiring a jewish linguist.....so on and so forth......
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2016
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  17. Nuvneet Kundu

    Nuvneet Kundu Senior Member Senior Member

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    And they already reached the moon because it is on their flag. :pound:
     
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  18. maomao

    maomao Veteran Hunter of Maleecha Senior Member

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    Forget Niel Armstrong or Buzz Aldrin.....do you know who was the first man to visit the moon one fine night according to their texts?? Make a wild guess?
     
  19. Indx TechStyle

    Indx TechStyle Perfaarmance Naarmal Senior Member

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    They will just simply copy and paint Chinese or Western. Their $hity organization KRL derived missiles from American donated Rehbar-I and then tagged it as pindigenous.
    :pound::pound::pound::pound:
    They even call those 60s era derived missiles better than India's. :D
     
  20. Indx TechStyle

    Indx TechStyle Perfaarmance Naarmal Senior Member

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    How dare you yevil yindoo kuffur Bharati Baniya to dare to say a word against the great islami eemarat purr land al bakistan?
    :biggrin2:
    Jinnah and his 72 virgins. :biggrin2:
     
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  21. Indx TechStyle

    Indx TechStyle Perfaarmance Naarmal Senior Member

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