Submarines of the world

Discussion in 'Indian Navy' started by pyromaniac, Aug 10, 2009.

  1. pyromaniac

    pyromaniac Founding Member

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    I made a list of all the Latest SSBN’s and also put in a brief “synopsis” of their capabilities and size so as to help us better compare India’s new submarine with the Established players. This is just a brief list I made in a couple of hours, I will look to expand it more in the near future and delve into more technical aspects. In particular I would like to talk more about the different types of reactors and also do a comparison of the different types of SLBM’s that are present on these boats.

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    Ohio class is the 6th Generation nuclear powered SSBN for the United States navy and is the 2nd largest submarine ever built after the Russian Typhoon class.

    · Operational on 11 November 1981
    · Displaces 16,764 Tons Surfaced and 18,750 Tons Submerged, Depth of 1000ft
    · 170 meter Length with a 13meter Beam
    · Powered by 1 S8G reactor (Generation II Pressurized Water Reactor), output Classified. Capable of 25+ knots submerged
    · 24* UGM-133 Trident II (Capable of 12 MIRV; however due to treaty carry 4-5 warheads) with up to 12,000km range depending on Warhead (W88 – 475kt yield; W76- 100kt yield)


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    Vanguard class is the 2nd Generation nuclear powered SSBN for the English Navy

    · Operational on 14 August 1993
    · 17,560 Tons submerged,
    · 149.9 m with a beam: 12.8 m and Draught: 12 m
    · Powered by 1*PWR-2 Reactor (Generation II Pressurized Water Reactor), output Classified. Capable of about 25knots
    · 16* UGM-133 Trident II (Believed to carry up to 128 missiles)


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    Borei Class is the 7th generation Nuclear powered SSBN for the Russian Navy ( 8th SSBN- Golf class was a Diesel-Electric powered SSBN)*

    · Operational on 15th April 2007
    · Displaces 14,720 Tons surfaced and 24,000 tons submerged
    · 170 meter length, 13.5m beam with a 10m Draught
    · Powered by 1*OK-650B reactor (Generation II Pressurized Water Reactor), Capable of 29knots
    · 16* Bulava, NATO Designation- SS-NX-30 (6-10 MIRV) with a range of over 8000KM

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    Triomphant is the 2nd generation nuclear powered SSBN for French Navy.

    · Operational on 21 March 1997
    · Displaces 12,640 Ton surfaced and 14,335 Ton submerged
    · 138 Meter in length, 12.5 meter Beam and 10.6m Draught
    · Powered by K15 nuclear Reactor (Generation II Pressurized Water Reactor) producing 150MW capable of over 25knots
    · 16* M45 SLBM (6 MIRV) with up to 6000km range


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    Type 94 is the second Generation of Chinese Nuclear powered SSBN* and is based on the Type 93 Nuclear powered attack Submarine

    · Believed to become operational soon
    · Displaces 8,000t Surfaced and 9,000tons submerged
    · 133m Length
    · Powered by unknown nuclear reactor, >58MW (Believed to be a generation II Pressurized Water Reactor), capable of 20+ knots
    · 12*JL-2; NATO Designation – CCS-N-4Mod0 (3-4 MIRV) with a range of over 8000KM

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    Airhant is the 1st generation of nuclear powered SSBN for Indian Navy

    · Believed to become operational around 2012-2014
    · Displaces 6000Tons
    · 110m Length, 10mBeam, 9m Draft
    · Powered by a generation II Pressurized Water Reactor outputting 80MW, with a top speed of 24knots
    · 12*K15, Sagarika with a range of 750KM – NO MIRV ::::::: 4* K-X, Agni III SLBM with a range of 5500 km- MIRV possible *



    * Note: Soviet Navy heavily modified the Delta I class and the Yankee I class SSBN’s and I included them in my list. However with the exception of the Delta II and Yankee II class of submarines the Borei is the 6th Generation of SSBN/
    5fth Generation of Nuclear Powered SSBN that has been designed ground up for the Russian navy

    *Note: Type 96 Nuclear powered SSBN is already believed to be in development

    *Agni-III variants to have MIRV capabilites.


    Judging by the size of the Airhant it seems closer in size to a SSN as opposed to a SSBN. There have also been reports that it shares a lot of similarities of the Charlie-II class of submarines that was leased to India and also shares some similarities with the Akula class namely the towed array on the aft sail is like that of a Akula. With that said, the Airhant class is severely underpowered when comparing it to the existing SSBN’s in service, in fact the 80MW reactor is substantially smaller than the 190MW reactor on the Akula. Both the top speed and the displacement of the Airhant put it close to the Charlie-II submarines. What is worthy of note is that every country that has a SSBN in service originally conceived a SSN and then modified it to an SSBN. However that seems not to be the case with India.
     
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  3. zraver

    zraver Defence Professionals Defence Professionals

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    The Borei Class does not have a working missile, the whole Bulava project may be scrapped soon.

    You forgot the Typhoon, which with the Hotel class makes the Borei a 7th gen (9th if you count the SSB), .

    Previous classes- France Redoubtable class, US- George Washington class, Ethan Allen class, Lafayette class, James Madison class, Benjamin Franklin class. UK-Resolution class USSR-Hotel (SSBN) and Golf and Zulu SSB classes.
     
  4. ant80

    ant80 Regular Member

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    I am confused what the definition of the generations in SSN/SSBN stand for. I looked it up and I can't figure it out. I am guessing that each advance in shipbuilding technology and reactor technology would be the next generation. Is that correct?
     
  5. venom

    venom DFI Technocrat

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    It is based on the number of SSBN classes in the countries Inventory...
     
  6. pyromaniac

    pyromaniac Founding Member

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    Thats what I thought at first..then I did a little digging around...


    Russia on Friday said it plans to stick with its troubled Bulava ballistic missile program despite another failed test last month, RIA Novosti reported (see GSN, July 24).


    Russia Says "No Choice" But to Continue Bulava Missile Development


    The Bulava, a submarine-launched ballistic missile that Moscow hopes will be a cornerstone of its nuclear arsenal for years to come, exploded less than 30 seconds into its most recent trial launch. It was the sixth failure in 11 tries and prompted the resignation of the head of the organization designing the weapon.

    The cause of the latest failure remains under investigation. It also remains to be seen whether the incident constitutes a major blow to the development of the nation's next-generation weapon-delivery system.

    "Everything depends on the conclusions reached by an investigative commission," said Deputy Defense Minister Vladimir Popovkin. Those conclusions could come next week, he said.

    Testing of the missile could continue later this month, according to RIA Novosti.

    Some critics in government and the private defense sector have lobbied to mothball the Bulava and to emphasize the already-deployed, submarine-launched Sineva missile, which can be armed with between four and 10 nuclear warheads and fly up to 7,100 miles.

    However, Popovkin said that it is too late to abandon the Bulava, as Russia is already producing submarines designed to carry the missile.

    "We have no choice," he said. "We already have one [Borei-class] submarine, and have laid down more, so to start a new [research and development] project would be unrealistic."

    Popovkin pointed out that developing a new missile costs as much as $1 billion, on top of $2 billion for a new submarine.

    "These are serious expenses," he said. "But the most important thing is the years (spent on development), because we urgently need to change our sea-based strategic delivery vehicles"


    NTI: Global Security Newswire - Russia Says "No Choice" But to Continue Bulava Missile Development
     
  7. John

    John Guest

    The Trident SLBMs remain the fastest and deadliest missiles in the world.
     
  8. zraver

    zraver Defence Professionals Defence Professionals

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    They are even faster and deadlier than many people think. Since the US des not shelter its SSBN's like Russia does but sends them into harmsway. With the exception of Russia (500 mile limit) a US SSBN could be just a hundred of so miles off shore and set up to do a sub orbital slant shot that would give a nations command and control less than 5 minutes to react before the onset of Oblivion.
     
  9. venom

    venom DFI Technocrat

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    Russia shortlisted for submarine contract with Indonesia

    JAKARTA, August 11 (RIA Novosti) - Russia has been shortlisted for a $700 million contract to deliver two submarines to Indonesia, the Indonesian Navy commander said on Tuesday.

    "Of the four bidders for the submarines, Russia and South Korea have reached the final round, passing France and Germany," Admiral Tedjo Edhy Purdijatno said.

    Russia's bid is the Project 636 diesel-electric submarine (export agent Rosoboronexport) while South Korea's is the U-209 sub manufactured by Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering under German license.

    "One of the principal conditions [of the contract] is, among other things, the transfer of technology," Purdijatno said.

    The successful bidder is expected to be named by the end of August.

    The Indonesian defense minister has said the submarines are to be delivered in 2011.

    Russia shortlisted for submarine contract with Indonesia | Top Russian news and analysis online | 'RIA Novosti' newswire
     
  10. John

    John Guest

    The Trident has a terminal top speed of mach 30+, this makes it so unstoppable.
     
  11. Jagdpanther

    Jagdpanther Regular Member

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    I'm wondering whether or not the Airhant sub will become the navy version of LCA or Arjun. India always like to bite more than they can chew.
     
  12. shankarosky

    shankarosky Regular Member

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    Believed to become operational around 2012-2014
    · Displaces 6000Tons
    · 110m Length, 10mBeam, 9m Draft
    · Powered by a generation II Pressurized Water Reactor outputting 80MW, with a top speed of 24knots

    dispalcement my guess is 6500 ton surfaced -8500 ton submerged -9000 ton plus armed and submerged
    speed max close to 40 knots

    again we will only know for sure much later- but if you go through various staements made in the aftermath of launch -you will come to same conclussion

    reactor output close to 190 mW thermal 45 MW energy to propel it at clsoe to 40 knots
    similar to ok650 that powers the akula 2
     
  13. bengalraider

    bengalraider DFI Technocrat Stars and Ambassadors

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    i second that ; 6000tonnes is only the surfaced displacement the submerged displacement is much larger.
     
  14. sandeepdg

    sandeepdg Senior Member Senior Member

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    I sincerely hope that the DRDO expedites the process of developing the SLBM version of the the Agni 3 for the the navy which is stated to have an range of 3500 kms ......... as long as we don't have an SLBM for our n-subs, they simply won't complete the the basic idea of an n-triad which is so important in the current times..... also its reported that an Arihant type sub will be carrying only 4 of these missiles which is very less.... i wish they have atleast 8 of these SLBMs on each sub.........
     
  15. proud_hindustani

    proud_hindustani Regular Member

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    Submarine dedicated thread

    let's post pics of submarines India, Russia and other countries own. let's share our knowledge on it.


    Typhoon is a world's largest nuclear operated submarine.

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    The Typhoon-class submarine is a ballistic missile-carrying, nuclear-powered submarine (SSBN) deployed by the Soviet Navy in the 1980s. With a displacement of up to 48,000 tons, the Typhoon is the largest submarine class in the world ever built. The name stems from the use of the word "typhoon" by Leonid Brezhnev in a 1974 speech while describing a new type of nuclear ballistic missile submarine. The Typhoon class was developed under Project 941 as the Russian Akula-class (the Russian word for "Shark", although NATO uses the name Akula class to designate Russian Project 971 Shchuka-B-class subs).

    The Typhoon-class submarine is a ballistic missile-carrying, nuclear-powered submarine (SSBN) deployed by the Soviet Navy in the 1980s. With a displacement of up to 48,000 tons, the Typhoon is the largest submarine class ever built. The name stems from the use of the word "typhoon" by Leonid Brezhnev in a 1974 speech while describing a new type of nuclear ballistic missile submarine. The Typhoon class was developed under Project 941 as the Russian Akula-class (the Russian word for "Shark", although NATO uses the name Akula class to designate Russian Project 971 Shchuka-B-class subs).

    Typhoon-class subs feature multiple pressure hulls that simplify internal design while making the vessel much wider than a normal submarine (in the main body of the sub, two Delta-class pressure hulls lie parallel with a third, smaller pressure hull above them). This also greatly increases their survivability - even if one pressure hull is breached, the crew members in the other are safe and there is less potential for flooding.

    Typhoon subs are quieter (partly due to the vessels' massive size) and yet more maneuverable than their predecessors. Additionally, the Typhoon class features six torpedo tubes: two are designed to handle SS-N-15 missiles or Type 53 torpedoes, and the other four are designed to launch SS-N-16 missiles, Type 65 torpedoes, or mines.

    Six Typhoon class submarines were built with each carrying 20 R-39 (SS-N-20) missiles with 10 nuclear warheads each. Originally, the submarines were designated by hull numbers only. Names were later assigned to the four vessels retained by the Russian Navy: Arhangelsk, Simbirsk, Severstal, and Dmitry Donskoi. The construction of an additional vessel was cancelled. Only one of these submarines, Dmitry Donskoi, is still in service with the Russian Navy, as a test platform for the Bulava missile currently under development. All the R-39 missiles have been retired.
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    Virginia Class Submarine

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    The Next-Generation Submarine

    The Virginia Class submarine will provide the U. S. Navy the capabilities required to maintain the nation’s undersea supremacy well into the 21st century. It will have improved stealthiness, sophisticated surveillance capabilities, and special warfare enhancements to meet the Navy’s multi-mission requirements.

    This next-generation submarine is the first U.S. submarine class to be designed for battlespace dominance across a broad spectrum of regional and littoral missions as well as open-ocean, “blue water” missions. It will achieve the right balance between core military capabilities and affordability.

    The construction contract for the first four Virginia Class submarines was awarded on September 30, 1998, to Electric Boat Corporation, with Newport News Shipbuilding serving as the major subcontractor. Under the construction contract, and consistent with a unique teaming plan, the shipbuilders will alternate final assembly and testing of the four ships. Newport News will build the bow, stern, sail, and selected forward modules for each submarine, while Electric Boat will build the hull cylinders, the engine room modules, and the command and control system module. Both shipbuilders will fabricate reactor compartments for the ships they assemble. This construction teaming plan is shown in the pictorial below.

    Multi-Mission Operations and Operational Flexibility

    The Virginia Class submarine is being designed for multi-mission operations and enhanced operational flexibility. Seawolf Class quieting is being incorporated in a smaller hull, while military performance will be maintained or improved.

    The Virginia Class submarine is being engineered for maximum design flexibility. Its responsiveness to changing missions and threats, and the affordable insertion of new technologies, ensures that it will continue to be the right submarine well into the 21st century. Integrated electronic systems with Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) components facilitate state-of-the-art technology introduction throughout the life of the Virginia Class submarine and avoids unit obsolescence.

    The Command, Control, Communications, and Intelligence (C3I) electronics packages also promote maximum flexibility for growth and upgrade. Coupled with the Modular Isolated Deck Structure (MIDS) and open-system architecture, this approach results in a significantly lower cost, yet more effective command and control structure for fire control, navigation, electronic warfare, and communications connectivity.

    Features

    The Virginia Class submarine’s sonar system will be state-of-the-art with vastly increased signal processing power than today’s attack submarine! The system will be able to process and distribute data received from its spherical bow array, high-frequency array suite, dual towed arrays, and flank array suite. The Virginia Class submarine C3I prime contract was awarded to Lockheed Martin Federal Systems, Manassas, Virginia, in April 1996. This system, through its extensive use of COTS and open system architecture, is a pace setter on achieving breakthroughs in system affordability and flexibility. This innovative approach will achieve new performance standards while minimizing risk, and promoting new levels of extended contractor responsibility and participation in the maintenance and upgrade of the system over its life-cycle.

    The sail configuration houses two new photonics masts for improved imaging functions, an improved electronics support measures mast, and multi-mission masts that cover the frequency domain for full-spectrum, high data-rate communications. The sail is also designed for future installation of a special mission-configurable mast for enhanced flexibility and warfighting performance.

    The Virginia Class Ship Control System (SCS) provides all the control and monitoring functions for maneuvering and controlling ship dynamic operations. Included in the technology strategy for the SCS is fly-by-wire. Similar to advanced aircraft, fly-by-wire architecture is a control system which relies on redundant electronic data buses operated by a fault tolerant set of processors to control the operator’s commands to the control surfaces actuators. This replaces the past exclusive use of hydraulic controls between the ship control station and control surfaces.

    The Virginia Class submarine will be armed with a variety of weapons, including the most advanced heavyweight torpedoes, mines, Tomahawk cruise missiles, and Unmanned Undersea Vehicles (UUVs) for horizontal launch. In addition, Tomahawk missiles will be carried in vertical launch tubes. The submarine also features an integral Lock-Out/Lock-In chamber for special operations, and can host Special Operations Forces underwater delivery vehicles.

    Reducing Costs

    Reducing acquisition and life-cycle costs is a major objective of the Virginia Class submarine design and engineering process. Substantial cost avoidance is being achieved through the application of concurrent engineering design/build teams, computer-aided design and electronic visualization tools, system simplification, parts standardization, and component elimination. These innovations ensure that the ship will be affordable in sufficient numbers in order to satisfy America’s future nuclear attack submarine force level requirements. The end result is an extremely versatile weapon system at a nearly 30 percent reduction in follow ship cost.

    The Virginia Class Submarine Program Office is applying the lessons learned from successful Government and industry programs of similar scope and complexity to improve producibility and lower costs. Integrated Product and Process Development (IPPD) teams are bringing the combined experience of the shipbuilders, vendors, designers, engineers, and ship operators to bear on the ship design. The early involvement of production personnel on these teams ensures an excellent match between the design and the shipbuilder’s construction processes and facilities, allows a smoother transition from design to production, and reduces the number of engineering change orders typically required during lead ship construction. The ship is designed using a state-of-the-art digital database, which allows all members of the IPPD teams to work from a single design and provides three-dimensional electronic mock-ups throughout the design process.

    In order to provide cost-effective production of Virginia Class submarines, a co-production (teaming) arrangement has been established utilizing the combined strengths of Electric Boat Corporation and Newport News Shipbuilding. This co-production arrangement fits with each company’s independent objective of maintaining its technological skills, operational capacity, facilities, and other strengths in the design and construction of submarines, while offering the Government the best combination of performance, cost, and delivery. Cost effectiveness is realized through an integrated ship’s construction workscope split that allows for steeper learning curves at each shipyard, more efficient rollover of trades, and reduced second yard planning efforts.

    These efforts, along with strong support from Navy and shipbuilder management, will result in an affordable submarine that satisfies all operational needs.

    Performance

    The military performance of the Virginia Class submarine will be comparable to that of the Seawolf Class, with significant improvement in littoral warfare capabilities and considerably less cost. It will surpass the performance of any current projected threat submarine, thus ensuring U.S. undersea dominance well into the next century. And the develop-design-build process that the Virginia Class submarine program has created will be the role model for future Navy design efforts.
     
  16. proud_hindustani

    proud_hindustani Regular Member

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    Americans and Russians got talents to build such submarines
     
  17. K Factor

    K Factor A Concerned Indian Senior Member

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  18. proud_hindustani

    proud_hindustani Regular Member

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  19. RAM

    RAM The southern Man Senior Member

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  20. K Factor

    K Factor A Concerned Indian Senior Member

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    SSBN means a boomer. Check the thread I gave the link to.
     
  21. proud_hindustani

    proud_hindustani Regular Member

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    thanks for the explanation.
    Russia and US build great nuclear submarine. Do france have any competition with these two countries in term of building nuclear submarine?
     

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