Strategic Command HQ : Pune or Jaipur- Poll

Discussion in 'Strategic Forces' started by A.V., Jan 15, 2011.

?

where should strategic command HQ be situated?

  1. pune

    13 vote(s)
    38.2%
  2. jaipur

    6 vote(s)
    17.6%
  3. neither

    15 vote(s)
    44.1%
  1. A.V.

    A.V. New Member

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    The creation of new strategic command is well under process , sites shortlisted for the hq include pune and jaipur

    which according to you will serve better strategic function?
    answer with the poll
     
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  3. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    Pune i think is more appropriate. It already has an airbase of the Sukhois. Plus Jaipur is well withing Pak air strikes and missiles.
     
  4. Oracle

    Oracle New Member

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    /\/\/\ I agree with Yusuf. Correct me if I am wrong, but the Strategic Command would deal with Nuclear bombers and Pune is the safest place for assets such as nukes and their delivery platforms.
     
  5. JBH22

    JBH22 Senior Member Senior Member

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  6. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    well its not that the strategic command will have all assets with it.. command and control. we can have assets dispersed all over the country. the sukhoi base there makes sure that the area is protected.
     
  7. nrj

    nrj Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    Strategic Command HQ will be setup somewhere maybe Pune maybe Jaipur. But we'll never know where these Nuke assets will be placed. It'll remain secret & or changing forever.

    If to consider geographical location of HQ sighting threat of incoming attack, nearby areas of Jaipur will be better than Pune as you don't want your Economic capital & SFC HQ destroyed in one good attempt.

    My 2 bucks.........
     
  8. jayadev

    jayadev Founding Member

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    i think it must be located in thiruvananthapuram.. HQ of southern air command
     
  9. nrj

    nrj Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    I'm yet to see sophisticated structure of Indian Strategic Forces Command. Look at the US STRATCOM HQ-

    [​IMG]

    In 1955 Leo A. Daly designed two buildings for SAC at SAC headquarters, Offutt Air Force Base: the headquarters command post, with above and below ground components, and, the chapel. Both structures were more than functional, and both offered a portrait of the Cold War easily enhanced through imagination. Leo A. Daly designed the SAC command post at Offutt at the outset of February 1955. The post replaced the simple three-story office building, the A Building, that SAC had adapted from the Martin Bomber Plant.

    The new command post featured a four-story, reinforced concrete and masonry office building aboveground, more than 16 times larger than the modest administrative A Building. Sometimes called the Western Pentagon, the aboveground SAC headquarters building was of classic 1950s office design. Although the administrative structure had a basement, it was a segregated, adjacent three-story structure below ground that served SAC as its command post throughout most of the Cold War period. Of hardened reinforced concrete, the below ground command post was itself more than five times the size of the original A Building. The underground command post had 24-inch thick walls and base floor, with 10-inch thick intermediate floors, and 24-to-42-inch thick roof; blast- and gas-proof doors; and, ramped tunnels with non-skid surfacing and decontamination areas connecting to an extended tunnel leading up to the aboveground office building. The final ramped tunnel was eight-foot in diameter, with two-foot thick reinforced concrete walls.

    Historically, and today, the below ground command post is known at Offutt as the “molehole” due to its ramped tunnels and self-contained condition. The SAC headquarters underground command post was in construction during 1955-1957—simultaneous in its later stages with planning for the SAC bomber and tanker alert aprons and semi-subterranean crew quarters, the latter also known as moleholes. The structure also featured lavish and modern connections to the world outside. Its “big board,” a series of maps and postings showing military conditions worldwide, ran along the 264-foot side of the post. In the beginning, SAC updated the board manually, using personnel in cherry-pickers, and making the setting more theatrical through its frontal suspended lighting and drawn curtain. Key military personnel looked down on the big board from glassed-in offices. Communications links were state-of-the-art, with the first SAC command post computer the IBM 704, installed in 1957. The IBM 704, available in 1954-1955, was primarily used in the military and in scientific laboratories, as late as 1959. Six 16-foot data display screens updated SAC personnel in the war room. A “red phone” system, with dedicated connections to 200 operating locations internationally, further supported communications in the SAC underground command post.

    Approximately 1000 people worked underground at the height of the command post’s use, with the capacity to sustain up to 800 people underground for two weeks.

    Leo A. Daly handled the new headquarters underground command post assignment, between 1986 and 1989, as it had the first below ground command post in 1955-1957. The SAC command post of the late Cold War was a 16,000 square-foot, two-story reinforced concrete structure, joined to the earlier command center. In addition to reasonable hardening, the new underground command post included protection against electromagnetic pulse. As had been the case in the middle 1950s, the post featured state-of-the-art communications links and information displays.

    Imagery for SAC was still paramount, with that for this particular subterranean command post even commented upon by the popular author of late Cold War thrillers, Tom Clancy. He wrote in The Sum of All Fears in 1991 that local rumor at Offutt had it that the second generation command post “had been built because Hollywood’s rendition of such rooms was better than the one SAC had originally built for itself, and the Air Force had decided to alter its reality to fit a fictional image.” Fiction or fact, the Clancy observation was not far from true in its understanding of just how much Hollywood film had nurtured the popular understanding of SAC and the Cold War. By 1961, even engineers were using the term “Hollywood hard” in distinguishing between truly hardened infrastructure and visually “hard” infrastructure—the latter always fortress-like for the public, but often vulnerable. As early as 1954, the Air Force Installations Board commented: “Beyond 1960, the increase in weapons yield will be such that…above-ground hardening will not be economically or operationally feasible.” Command Center

    As the nerve center of the United States Strategic Command, the USSTRATCOM Command Center is prepared to transmit National Command Authority directives to strategic aircraft, submarines and missile forces.

    [​IMG]

    The USSTRATCOM Command Center is located in the Underground Command Complex. Also located within this complex are the Intelligence Operations Center, Weather Support Center, Force Status Readiness Center, the Alternate Processing and Correlation Center [APCC]and other support offices.

    The Alternate Processing and Correlation Center [APCC] provides an alternate missile warning correlation center to Cheyenne Mountain Air Station (CMAS) for USSPACECOM, and is the prime source of missile warning data for USSTRATCOM for force survival and force management. It is comprised of the integration of the SCIS, CSSR, and CCPDS-R systems as well as numerous non-Cheyenne Mountain upgrade equipment and communications links into a two story, underground, high altitude electromagnetic pulse (HEMP) protected facility at Offutt AFB, NE.

    The USSTRATCOM Command Center is a specially-designed, two-level, 14,000-square-foot reinforced concrete and steel structure containing the critical information management and communication systems to provide the Commander in Chief of USSTRATCOM (CINCSTRAT) an assured capability to manage forces worldwide. In time of war, the underground would be sealed off. An underground emergency power supply, a well supplying an emergency water source, and rations would allow continuous operations without outside support for an extended period of time. Electromagnetic pulse protection is provided for critical command, control and communications equipment as well as supporting utilities. This allows CINCSTRAT to continuously exercise command over USSTRATCOM forces, even in the disturbed electromagnetic environment which would follow a high altitude nuclear burst.

    When the Command Center is self-contained, CINCSTRAT and members of the senior staff would work in the lower level senior battle staff area, while support staff members would take designated positions in the support battle staff area on the second floor.

    Workstation consoles provide CINCSTRAT and senior and support battle staff members state-of-the-art integrated secure/nonsecure voice communications and data management systems. Individual video monitors at each console position provide an advanced capability to display information essential to decision making and to manage the command's aircraft and missile forces. Support battle staff members have individual computer terminals which access an advanced automatic data processing system that provides word processing, spreadsheets, computational aids, graphic/tabular decision making information and automated briefing preparation and presentation.

    --Command Center--

    The Command Center's group display and briefing support system provides the capability to display full motion video and still frame imagery on eight large wall screens and individual video monitors. It also allows video communications between the Command Center and weather and force status readiness centers; the capability to convert hard copy, 35 mm slides, or overhead transparencies into video; and rapid access to worldwide maps. Within seconds, vital operational data can be displayed on the large wall display screens or individual computer monitors. The primary system for storing and supplying this data is the USSTRATCOM Automated Command Control System. Information about weather, force movements, aircraft and missiles is stored in computers, ready for immediate access. Field units continually update the data.

    In time of war, the computers would record strike force progress, serving as an invaluable aid to CINCSTRAT in making command and operations decisions. Because the information would be processed automatically, the battle staff would have immediate and continuous updates on its strike force.

    The Primary Alerting System, using dedicated telephone circuits, enables USSTRATCOM controllers to speak directly to approximately 200 operating locations throughout the world, including missile launch control centers. Through this "Red Phone" system, each unit receives coded messages giving notice of an actual or practice alert. The Senior Controller also has a direct line to the National Military Command Center in Washington, DC, and to the other major command headquarters. This system, called the Joint Chiefs of Staff Alerting Network, allows CINCSTRAT prompt contact with the President, the Secretary of Defense, the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and other unified commanders.

    Through satellites and radio networks (VLF, LF, UHF and HF), the Command Center can communicate with aircraft in flight over any part of the world. A principal purpose of these networks is to pass National Command Authority orders to the alert forces. Several detection systems provide the USSTRATCOM Command Center with Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM) and Sea-Launched Ballistic Missile (SLBM) attack warnings. This information is processed through high-speed computers for display on the Command Center's large screens, the CINCSTRAT's video monitors, and the Warning System Controller's video monitors.

    Information shown on these screens would instantly alert the Senior Controller of an ICBM or SLBM attack against the North American continent or our allies. These systems, along with summary information and attack assessment from other military commands, permit CINCSTRAT to protect his force pending the presidential decision. Although CINCSTRAT can launch aircraft for survival, only the President can order nuclear strikes. In the event the USSTRATCOM Command Center becomes inoperable, control of strategic forces would be passed to the USSTRATCOM Airborne Command Post, which is ready to become airborne 24 hours a day.
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2011
  10. nrj

    nrj Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    Us stratcom hq

    Nodes of STRATCOM & commanding officers -


    J0 – Office of the Commander –

    StratCom Commander Kevin Chilton (Air Force) is charged with overseeing the Pentagon’s ‘triad’ of offensive nuclear and conventional weapons; defensive systems (from Missile Defense to Information Operations); and infrastructure such as communications and intelligence. This unprecedented mission array—which spans the globe and encompasses a good portion of the Pentagon’s duties—explains why Commander Chilton says Strategic Command would more appropriately be named ‘Global Command.’ The StratCom command center is located at Offutt AFB in suburban Omaha, Nebraska. (...)

    ------------

    --Functional Component Commands--

    Space – Lt. Gen. Larry D. James (Air Force) – StratCom’s Space Command serves as the single point of contact for planning, coordinating and executing space military operations. With every function and branch of the U.S. military now ‘knit’ together by space technology, StratCom is integrally engaged in the global fight—whether it’s conducting surveillance of suspected terrorists, piloting drone aircraft by satellite, or providing ‘real time’ communications to soldiers in the field. The Space Command is headquartered at Vandenberg AFB on the central coast of California.

    Global Strike – Maj. Gen. Floyd L. Carpenter (Air Force) – The war-fighting component in StratCom’s mission quiver, Global Strike Command leads the offensive planning operations for both nuclear and conventional attacks and coordinates the global strike efforts for the six regional Combat Commands around the world. Tasked with attacking any place on the face of the earth within one hour, global strike (in the words of Commander Chilton) is “the most responsive combatant command in the U.S. arsenal.” Global Strike Command is headquartered at Barksdale AFB in Louisiana.

    Integrated Missile Defense – Lt. Gen. Kevin Campbell (Army) – Billed as a ‘defensive’ shield to protect the U.S. and it allies from attack, this ‘Star Wars’ program is fueling tensions with Russia and China over its ‘dual-use’ as an offensive missile system and anti-satellite weapon. The command’s headquarters at Schriever AFB near Colorado Springs oversees deployment operations, intelligence, logistics and staffing. StratCom’s authority over all of the service branches is particularly in evidence with this command, as the Army staffs the ground-based missile defense battalions; the Navy operates its fleet of Aegis missile defense vessels; and the Air Force is tasked with making the elements (including the ground- and sea-based radars) work
    together.

    Joint Information Operations Warfare Command – Mr. Mark Johnson, Dir. (Army)– Previously known as the ‘Joint Electronic Warfare Center’ and the ‘Joint Command & Control Warfare Center,’ this cryptically named command exploits information to influence the tide of war. ‘Information Operations’ covers everything from fusing the intelligence gathered by different agencies and sources into unified databases and ‘mining’ it for particular subjects, to conducting
    ‘psychological warfare’ on targets by means of propaganda and deception. The command is headquartered at Lackland AFB in San Antonio.

    Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) – Lt. Gen. Ronald L. Burgess Jr. (Army) – This command coordinates the efforts of Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA), National Security Agency (NSA), National Reconnaissance Office (NRO) and National Geospatial Intelligence Agency to coordinate intelligence information with the Joint Forces Command. StratCom’s mission responsibility for ISR, however, extends to all sixteen organizations within the U.S. Intelligence Community—including the CIA and FBI (which StratCom brags are “in our operations center 24/7.” The command is headquartered at Bolling AFB, Washington, D.C.

    Network Warfare – Lt. General Keith B. Alexander (Army) – Based at the National Security Agency (NSA) headquarters in Fort Meade, Maryland, and sharing the same ‘dual-hatted’ director, this StratCom component command plans and executes U.S. operations in cyberspace. Network Warfare’s responsibilities include not only defense of America’s civilian and military computer networks, but also offensive cyber attack. The NSA is most famous for directing the Bush/Cheney Administration’s constitutionally suspect ‘warrantless surveillance’ of U.S. citizens during the height of the ‘War on Terror.’ Alexander was just handed yet a third commission early in 2010 as the official director of Pentagon’s Cyber Command.

    Global Network Operations, Joint Task Force – Lt. Gen. Carroll F. Pollett (Army) – A separate command from Network Warfare whose cyber duties inevitably overlap, the Joint Task Force for Global Network Operations is charged with the operation and defense of the ‘Global Information Grid’ (GIG). A globally interconnected communications project of the Department of Defense, the GIG is designed to give U.S. warfighters, policymakers and business interests ‘information superiority’ on demand. The command has its headquarters in Arlington, Virginia, but operates worldwide through ‘Theater Network Operation Centers.’

    Center for Combating Weapons of Mass Destruction – Kenneth A. Myers III – In the wake of the 9/11 attacks and the allegations of Iraq’s stockpiles of WMD, StratCom was assigned the mission for ‘Combating Weapons of Mass Destruction’ in 2005. Headquartered in Fort Belvoir, Virginia, the center is housed with the ‘Defense Threat Reduction Agency,’ with the same ‘dualhatted’ director serving both entities. The center is tasked with providing the Department of Defense expertise on containing the threat of the acquisition and the use of all types of WMD: nuclear, biological and chemical
    -------------

    --Service Components--

    Air Force Space Command – Gen. C. Robert Kehler (Air Force) – A remnant of the former U.S. Space Command, this group provides space and ICBM forces to StratCom. Air Force Space Command consists of two numbered Air Force wings: the 14th Air Force out of Vandenberg AFB provides space warfighting forces to StratCom, while the 20th Air Force provides ICBM missile management out of Warren AFB in Cheyenne, Wyoming. Also important is the 21st Space Wing at Peterson AFB, Colorado Springs, which performs space intelligence and control missions at bases such as Buckley AFB in Aurora, Colorado. The command headquarters is at Peterson AFB.


    U.S. Army Forces Strategic Command –
    Lt. Gen. Kevin Campbell (Army) – The Army has its own Space Command which manages Ballistic Missile Defense, but it falls under the authority of this more general group, the U.S. Army Forces Strategic Command, that also oversees ‘Stryker Brigade Combat Teams’ and some remaining tactical nukes. The command is headquartered at Redstone Arsenal near Huntsville, Alabama, and maintains major missile-defense forces at Peterson AFB and missile defense observation facilities at Kwajalein Atoll, Guam, and other Pacific locations.

    Marine Forces Strategic Command – Lt. General George J. Flynn (Marine Corp.) – One might have thought the Marines would play a minimal role at StratCom, but now that Northern Command includes ‘maritime ops’ in defense of the homeland, the Marines and Navy will jointly be playing a more global role in policing the seas. The headquarters is co-located at Offutt AFB, but also has a large reporting structure at Quantico, Virginia. Naming General James Cartwright as the first Marine to ever command StratCom in 2004 was widely viewed as an effort to integrate the Marines more closely into StratCom.

    Fleet Forces Command (FFC) – Adm. John C. Harvey, Jr. (Navy) - Despite its name, this command only exercises space and StratCom duties for the Atlantic and Caribbean areas. (Pacific Command plays a quasi-independent role in Global Strike missions in the Asia-Pacific.) But with the bulk of missile defense missions turning to sea-borne theater missile defense, Fleet Forces Command is likely to see a larger role in global Navy operations. The FFC includes the former Navy Space Command and active elements of Naval Security Group, handling everything from the Navy component of missile defense (Aegis cruisers) to global Navy space-based intelligence operations like ‘Ranger’ and ‘Classic Wizard.’ The command is headquartered in Norfolk, Virginia.
    ---------------------

    Task Forces - these are the ‘hardware management groups’ for weapons and platforms, with dedicated task forces for:

    Airborne Communications (Tinker AFB, Oklahoma) – Management of Navy E-6B Mercury aircraft for presidential emergency communications.

    Aerial Refueling and Tankers – (Scott AFB, Illinois) – Tankers are under the control of Air Mobility Command at Scott, but operated under 18th Air Force, also at Scott.

    Land-Based Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles (Warren AFB, Wyoming) – All land-based strategic missile crews report to the 20th Air Force at Warren, whilenuclear missile wings are operated out of Warren; Malmstrom AFB, Montana; and MinotAFB, North Dakota.

    Ballistic-Missile Submarines (Norfolk, Virginia and Pearl Harbor, Hawaii) – Atlantic Ocean submarines are deployed from Kings Bay, Georgia, under Atlantic Fleet command from Norfolk; Pacific Ocean-based submarines are based at Bangor, Washington, and commanded from Pacific Command headquarters in Hawaii.

    Strategic Bombers and Reconnaissance Aircraft – All strategic nuclear aircraft are assigned to the 8th Air Force at Barksdale AFB, Louisiana. B-52 heavy bombers are based at Barksdale and Minot; B-2 Stealth Bombers are based at Whiteman AFB, Missouri (B-1 bombers have been retired); RC-135 Rivet Joint surveillance aircraft are based out of Offutt AFB; and U-2S Dragon Lady surveillance aircraft are based out of Beale AFB, California.



    Multiple Sources



    Setting it up in Jaipur/Pune, how strong & secure physical establishment we are going to have for SFC HQ?
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2011
  11. KS

    KS Bye bye DFI Veteran Member

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    Neither

    The SFC should somewhere be in Orissa or West Bengal, because the future threat for India is not from the West, It is from the East.
     
  12. Godless-Kafir

    Godless-Kafir DFI Buddha Senior Member

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    I think it should be in the deep south hidden in the mountains and under large granite mountains against any nuclear strike!
     
  13. Oracle

    Oracle New Member

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    GK, we should also consider the range of the bombers in case of war, if a location down South is to be chosen.
     
  14. black eagle

    black eagle Senior Member Senior Member

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    Location for the HQ of the strategic forces' command is being discussed. It would house the office & the command & control centre. The bombers will fly from their bases elsewhere...
     
  15. Tshering22

    Tshering22 Sikkimese Saber Senior Member

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    MAN! We think alike..lol. I was also going to write the same thing. I think Orissa would make a fine SC center because it is southerly enough to avoid PLA overflowing into and at the same time is in the east. Bengal would be chaotic. I think Orissa is a fine suggestion. Anything more easterly into the NE would be a risk.
     
  16. tarunraju

    tarunraju Moderator Moderator

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    Secunderabad (Hyderabad dist., AP) or Kamptee (Nagpur dist., MH) should be strategic command HQ for their centralized location.
     
  17. civfanatic

    civfanatic Retired Moderator

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    Of the two options available, Pune is definitely the better choice, for reasons already stated by others.

    Remember, the HQ will just house the command & control structure, not the assets themselves. Thus, the priority of the location should be a place that is easily defensible, above all else. Pune fits the bill because it is home to two squadrons of Su-30MKIs, plus it is a safe distance from any direct attack by Pak or anyone else.

    Personally, I would like to see Hyderabad be the HQ but I am biased!
     
  18. S.A.T.A

    S.A.T.A Senior Member Senior Member

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    Any part of the Deccan plateau,esp the region north close to the Vindhyan ranges would considered ideal.these regions are known for their hard Basalt-Granite geology,ideal for any strategic forces command if it is to survive any presumptive enemy nuclear strike.If geologist are to be believed they have even survived meteorite impacts.
     
  19. tarunraju

    tarunraju Moderator Moderator

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    Exactly, which is why Kamptee struck me. A little further to the south (but not by much, 450 km) is Secunderabad.

    I'd choose Secunderabad because it has two IAF airfields (AFA Dundigal and AFA Hakimpet), a vast cantonment area, already secures Nuclear Fuel Complex (NFC), as well as homes crucial HAL, DRDO, and BDL facilities.
     
  20. hit&run

    hit&run Elite Member Elite Member

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    Nagpur should be SC HQ

    [​IMG]
     
  21. S.A.T.A

    S.A.T.A Senior Member Senior Member

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    Ideally you wouldn't want to setup the SFC in a major city like pune,Hyderabad or even secunderababd ,just too many security complications considering that the SFC would preferably be located in relative isolation from any major population centers.Kamptee appears suitable.
     

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